Toofly

The following guest post is by Houda Lazrak, a graduate student in Museum Studies at New York University.

"Icy and Sot"

As street art continues to gain legitimacy as a contemporary art movement throughout the world, New York City remains its cradle of birth and continues to attract artists from around the globe.  Gingko Press’s recently published Outdoor Gallery — New York City by author and photographer Yoav Litvin bears witness to the unmediated and diverse creative expression of New York City’s street art.  Thought provoking, comprehensive and aesthetically pleasing,  Outdoor Gallery presents hundreds of street art photographs, accompanied by interviews, featuring more than forty artists.

"Outdoor Gallery"

For two years Yoav immersed himself in the world of street artists, learning their visual language, engaging in their community and observing their habitus. Outdoor Gallery justly frames street art as a platform for disrupting society’s notion of the use of public space.  As the author states, street art is “a creative and non-violent form of rebellion.”

Toofly

The author provides us with a rare opportunity to view the artists’ actual process.  Yoav photographs artist Adam Dare’s steps as he installs his signature bunny paste-up on scaffolding in the dark of the night.  Jilly Ballistic, known for subway site-specific images, also agrees to guide us through a 9-step process of pasting an image of a city officer in the Astor Place metro station.

"Jilly Ballistic"

Although most of the photographs are taken soon after the images have surfaced, Yoav eloquently emphasizes the ephemeral nature of the art form in his opening commentary and throughout the interviews he conducted.  He also reminds us that street art is continuously at the mercy of many factors, such as neighborhood gentrification, weather conditions, vandalism and police intervention.   Photography serves as an ally in keeping the art works alive after they have faded or disappeared.

Hellbent

The book’s narrative also acknowledges and insists on the diversity of mediums, surfaces and messages embedded in the art pieces.  The interviews inform us of the range of intention behind the pieces.  For some artists, such as gilf!, Enzo & Nio, and Icy & Sot, political commentary is the rationale behind their work.  Alice Mizrachi, on the other hand, uses her large-scale murals to encourage community engagement. Finally, street art serves as a creative outlet and as a form of self-expression. Shiro describes her signature character as her “alternative self, reflecting [her] experiences and emotions as [she] goes through life.”

Never

This book provides remarkable insight into the motivations and the creative process of dozens of street artists whose works have surfaced in NYC. More than shedding light on the extraordinary talent of these artists, Outdoor Gallery inspires readers to discover for themselves the treasure trove of outdoor art New York City has to offer.

Outdoor Gallery — New York City can be ordered online at Amazon and is available from retailers worldwide including Low Brow Artique and Zakka in Brooklyn and Strand Books, the MoMA and Guggenheim Museum shops in Manhattan.

Images © Yoav Litvin 1. Icy & Sot in Williamsburg, Brooklyn; 2. Toofly in Bushwick, Brooklyn and in Astoria, Queens; 3. Jilly Ballistic process in underground metro; 4. Hellbent in Astoria, Queens & 5. Never Satisfied in Williamsburg, Brooklyn

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This is the second in an ongoing series featuring the range of faces that surface daily on NYC’s public spaces:

Australian artist Jess Busj at 5Pointz in Long Island City, Queens — close-up

Jess Busj

Russell King and Matt Siren at Welling Court in Astoria, Queens

Russell King and Matt Siren

Mata Ruda at the Bushwick Collective

Mata Ruda

Joseph Meloy at 5Pointz in Long Island City, Queens

Joseph Meloy

Toofly at the Bushwick Collective

Toofly

Australian artist Daek on Manhattan’s Lower East Side

daek william

Nelson Rivas aka Cekis in the Hunts Point section of the Bronx

Nelson Rivas aka Cekis

Photos by Lenny Collado, Tara Murray and Lois Stavsky

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One of NYC’s most spirited public art events celebrates its fourth year tomorrow with a huge block party at Welling Court in Astoria, Queens. For the past week, dozens of artists have been busy at work for this dynamic project, curated by Ad Hoc Art. Following is a glimpse of what we saw earlier this week:

Billy Mode and Chris Stain

Billy Mode and Chris Stain

Toofly at work with Fumero to the left

Fumero and Toofly

Lady Pink at work

Lady Pink

 Alice Mizrachi  and Olek

Alice Mizrachi and Olek

 The Royal Kingbee at work

KingBee

Logik One at work

Logik one

Dan Witz

Dan Witz

Dennis McNett, close-up

Denis McNett

Keep posted to our Facebook page for many more images in the week ahead.

Photos by Tara Murray

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The rooftop of the former Seward Park High School on Manhattan’s Lower East Side has evolved into one of NYC’s most enticing graffiti canvases.  Following is a sampling of what we saw this past Sunday as Rooftop Legends, curated by New Design High School dean, Jesse Pais, celebrated its sixth anniversary.

Marka27 and Don Rimx

Mark27 and Rimx

Fever

fever-graffiti

Graffiti pioneer Part One

Part-one

Smoke

smoke-graffiti

Toofly and Werds

Toofly and Werds

Style masters Shank aka Dmote, Wane and Aplus

Shane, wane and a-plus

Slave

Slave-graffiti

Dr. Revolt

Dr.-Revolt-graffiti-rooftop-legends-NYC

Ces

Ces

KR.One

KR.One

Pesu

Pesu

Queen Andrea

Queen Andrea

Vers

vers

Photos by Lenny Collado and Tara Murray

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During the past few weeks, over a dozen first-rate artists have been busy gracing the walls of the Bushwick Collective with an extraordinary array of images. Here is a sampling of what’s been happening:

Brooklyn-based Beau Stanton at work 

Beau Stanton

 Zimad signs his piece

Zimad

Sexer‘s completed masterpiece

Sexer

Brett Flanigan and Cannon Dill — in from the West Coast

Brett Flanigan and Cannon Dill

Col Wallnuts collaborates with Toofly

Col and Toofly

Brendon Rogers at work during his stopover in NYC

Brendon Rodgers

Creepy — in from Australia; segment of larger mural

Creepy

Melbourne’s Facter at work

Facter

Brooklyn-based Sonni

sonni

And we can expect even more great art — along with: guest food trucks, Miami Food Machine, Mike N’ Willies and Hibachi Heaven; a beer tent, sponsored by Corona Familiar, Bodega Wine Bar, Pearls Social and Billy Club, Mesa Azteca and Codigo Music, LLC; several bands, including Wild Yaks, Dead Sexy Shelia, Big Volcano, Cardboard, Dian’s Coffee, Grand Resor and ShiShi and DJ Jah Star of Ninjasonik — at this Sunday’s block party celebrating the Bushwick Collective’s first anniversary.  Bushwick Collective curator Joe Ficalora reports that among those artists painting live are: Franck Duval — in from Paris — on Flushing Avenue and Scott; Beau Stanton on Troutman between St. Nicholas and Cypress and Zimad and Sexer inside the beer tent, along with some surprise guests! Art, jewelry, clothing and more will be available from local merchants, and Limited Edition Bushwick Collective tee-shirts will be for sale. The official sponsor of this year’s event — held from 11am – 8pm at St. Nicholas Ave. and Troutman St. — is NOOKLYN.COM

Photos by Tara Murray and Lois Stavsky

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This is the ninth in a series of posts featuring images of girls — and women — who grace New York City’s public spaces:

Alice Mizrachi aka AM in Bushwick, Brooklyn

Alice Mizrachi

Cake in Bushwick, Brooklyn

cake-street-art-in-Bushwick

Hef’s hastily-buffed piece in East New York

Hef

Toofly at the Bushwick Collective

Toofly

Os Gemeos in Coney Island — since 2005

os-gemeos-street-art-in-Coney-Island-NYC

Noh J Coley at the Woodward Gallery Project Space on the Lower East Side

Nohjcoley-street-art-in-NYC

 Swoon in Clinton Hill, Brooklyn garden

swoon-street-art-in-Brooklyn-NYC

Photos by Tara Murray and Lois Stavsky

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Since 5Pointz began its 11th season earlier this month, its walls have served as a canvas for artists visiting NYC from across the globe. Here’s a sampling of what has surfaced in the past two weeks:

Onur, Wes21, Kkade from Switzerland and Semor from Germany

Onur, Semor, Wes21 & KKade

Semor and KKade

Semor and KKade

Vova Zomb from Moscow

Vova Zomb

Ecuadorian artist Toofly

Toofly

French Tunisian artist eL Seed, Jaye from Paris and Meres

eL Seed and Jaye

Funk from Montreal

Funk

Australian artists Zert and Stain

Zert and Stain

Indonesian artist MiesOne

MiesOne

Article from Houston, Texas

Article

 

Photos by Lenny Collado, Dani Mozeson, Tara Murray & Lois Stavsky

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This is the seventh in a series of posts featuring images of girls — and women — who grace New York City’s public spaces:

Toofly on Manhattan’s Lower East Side

Toofly

 French artist Frank Duval aka FKDL in Brooklyn

FKDL

FKDL

Lady Aiko in Bushwick, Brooklyn

Lady Aiko

Hef in Williamsburg, Brooklyn

Hef

 Russell King on the Lower East Side

Russell King

Shiro and King Bee in the Bronx

Shiro and King Bee

 Photos by Lenny Collado, Tara Murray and Lois Stavsky; Toofly image courtesy of the artist

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Speaking with Toofly

July 11, 2012

"Toofly at 5Pointz"

A self-described artist, designer and entrepreneur, Toofly is best-known for her signature character that has made its way onto walls across the globe, as well as onto a range of fashion items. We had the opportunity to meet up with Toofly this past week and ask her a few questions.

Your alluring character has been surfacing all around town. We’ve recently seen her in Williamsburg, at Welling Court, at 5Pointz and even on a Lower East Side rooftop. Can you tell us something about her?

She’s kind of like my alter ego. An outlet where I can express my emotion and ideas. She was once tough and with an attitude, but she has mellowed down over the years. And, like me, she is continually evolving.

More after the jump!

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For the third consecutive year, dozens of talented artists graced the walls of the Welling Court neighborhood of Astoria, Queens with a diverse range of images. We visited several times this past week beginning with the day before the Welling Court Mural Project, organized by Ad Hoc Art, held its official opening. On our most recent visit, we had the chance to observe and speak to neighborhood residents – all of whom expressed tremendous pride in their neighborhood’s visual landscape (and curiosity, as well, about the artists).  Here are a few images whose progress we observed:

New Jersey-based Joe Iurato aka .01

"Joe Iurato at Welling Court"

More after the jump!

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