Exhibits

I first came upon Brothers of Light’s winsome, witty aesthetic on the streets of Jerusalem several years ago. I was an instant fan. Currently on view at 30 Yefet Street — a stately, atmospheric building in Jaffa — is From Dirt, a delightfully intriguing exhibition featuring dozens of artworks fashioned this past year from metals found outside the brothers’ studio space. Featured above is Crossing the Bridge — fabricated with industrial paint on salvaged metal. Several more images I captured while visiting the exhibition earlier this week follow:

“Everything Is Temporary,” Industrial paint on found metal

“No Pain No Gain” and “Cuchara” to its left, Industrial paint on found metal kitchen utensils

“What Do You Eat?” Industrial paint on found metal kitchen utensil

“Time Sinking,” Industrial paint on found metal

“Suddenly,” Industrial paint on found metal

“Throwback,” Industrial paint on found metal

Segment of exhibition largely featuring small works–

Produced by Brothers of Light — real-life siblings, Elna and Gab — and curated by Hadas Glazer, From Dirt is at once  environmentally conscious and aesthetically engaging. It continues through Saturday evening with a closing party beginning at 6pm. A short film by Amalia Zilbershatz-Banay and Dan Deutsch accompanies the exhibition.

Photos of artworks: Lois Stavsky

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On view concurrently with LeCrue Eyebrows’ solo show at Van Der Plas Gallery is ROYAL FLUSH, a group exhibition featuring delightfully intriguing artworks by ten remarkably creative artists.

The huge mixed-media artwork featured above, Numb, was fashioned by Clown Soldier, whose now-iconic signature character I first encountered on NYC streets over a decade ago. Several more images of artworks — all by artists whose works have also surfaced in public spaces — now on view in ROYAL FLUSH follow:

The ever-inventive Al Diaz presents the wonderfully sardonic philosophical and political musings of SAMO©, the project that began in the late 70’s in collaboration with the now-legendary Basquiat

Brooklyn-based Canadian artist Jason McLean, “Gold Home,” 2022, Acrylic paint and acrylic ink Pental brush pen over found canvas

Legendary Lower East Side documentarian and visual artist Clayton Patterson, “Blue Knife,” 2021, Embroidery on fabric

London, Ontario-based ceramic artist Susan Day, “Untitled Mosaic No. 2,” 2022, Ceramic, glaze and underglaze

Toronto-based multimedia artist Devon Marinac, “Alpha Mantle Peace,” 2022, Acrylic on canvas

ROYAL FLUSH continues at Van Der Plas Gallery‘s  downstairs showroom through October 23. Located at  156 Orchard Street, the gallery is open Mon-Tue: 12pm-5pm, Wed-Sat: 11pm-6pm and Sunday: 11am-5pm. A closing reception will take place on Friday, October 21 from 6-8pm.

Photos of images and artists: Lois Stavsky

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When I first came upon LeCrue Eyebrows‘ artworks on the streets of my city, I was struck at once by its singular authenticity. Each piece intrigues, as it exudes a distinct aura of mystery. Visual meditations on such universal themes as love, loss and longing, the works are subtly strong and strikingly beautiful.

Not to be missed is the Queens-based artist’s first solo exhibition at Van Der Plas Gallery. At once quietly raw and soulfully elegant, each work tells a story – to be freely interpreted by its viewer.  And each piece was created freely and spontaneously, as nothing that Lecrue creates is premeditated. The act of painting, itself, is to the artist “an intense form of meditation.”

The beguiling image pictured above, “Move with Me,” was fashioned this year with acrylic on canvas. Several more images I captured while visiting “Primitive Form” last weekend follow:

“Own Storm,” Acrylic on canvas, 2022

“Stand With Me,” Acrylic on canvas, 2022

“Her Breath in Time,” Acrylic on canvas, 2022

“Just Beyond the Window,” Acrylic on canvas, 2022

And on a somewhat different note — “Together,” Mixed media on cold press paper, 2022

“Primitive Form” continues at Van Der Plas Gallery through October 23. Located at  156 Orchard Street, the gallery is open Mon-Tue: 12pm-5pm, Wed-Sat: 11pm-6pm and Sunday: 11am-5pm. A closing reception will take place on Friday, October 21 from 6-8pm.

Note: You can take a 3D tour of “Primitive Form” here.

Photos of artworks, Lois Stavsky

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For over two decades, Jersey City-based WOOLPUNK®  has been fashioning art that is at once visually captivating and socially stirring. Working largely with recycled textiles, found objects, photographs, and text-based imagery, she addresses such issues as environment endangerment, economic inequality and homelessness. Within the past year, her rich and inventive creations have made their way into a diverse range of sites including the World Trade Center, Bergdorf Goodman, and FIT’s Art and Design Gallery.

Currently on view at the Montclair Art Museum is WOOLPUNK®’s hugely impressive Sunflowers & Graffiti’d Sky in the Garden State. Based on a photograph of a community garden in Jersey City, the final production, 30 feet wide x 13 feet long, features recycled textiles on an embroidered photo. All of the materials used — clothing, fabric scraps and assorted textiles — were donated in response to the artist’s open call to the MAM community. And anything that wasn’t used was then donated to the Salvation Army.

Sunflowers & Graffiti’d Sky in the Garden State brilliantly brings attention to landfill waste that is comprised largely of clothing while questioning our penchant for the newest fashion trends. Featured above is the artist in front of her work. Several close-ups from Sunflowers & Graffiti’d Sky follow:

A small segment

The graffiti’d sky — which while beautiful, also “reminds us of the air-polluted sunsets”

More sunflowers

A closer look at the details

Sunflowers & Graffiti’d Sky in the Garden State remains on view through August 6, 2023. Located at 3 S Mountain Ave in Montclair, NJ, the Montclair Art Museum is open Friday and Saturday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Sunday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Photos 1-4, Lois Stavsky; 5, Courtesy of the artist

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Brooklyn Art Haus aka BAH! — a new hugely impressive home for innovative artworks and events in Williamsburg, Brooklyn that will officially open in January — debuts tomorrow evening, September 9, from 6-9pm with RAWTHENTIC. Curated by Silvertuna Studios and Collect with Lulu, the premier exhibition and event features a diverse array of contemporary urban artworks by legendary artists Chris RWK, Al Diaz, de la Haba, Kit 17, Easy, Zimad and Nite Owl, along with video presentations — filmed by Silvertuna Studios — of the artists at work. Also on view will be the distinctly unique Vanderhall Carmel GTS custom-designed and hand-painted by the artists.

A small selection of images from the dynamic, brilliantly curated exhibition follows:

Chris RWK, “Built For This,” Mixed media on canvas, 24″ x 24″

Al Diaz, “For The Haters,”  Mixed media on wood, 24″ x 34″

Gregory de la Haba, Straight Red Threes, Oil, krink, and spray paint on printed canvas, 78″ x 44″

Kit 17, “Subway Days Burner,” Mixed media on canvas, 63″ X 113″

Easy, (Right)  Bronze & Gold Tag Cut Outs on Wood, 24″ x 24″ and below them, “Steel,” Mixed media on canvas, 48″ x 48″

Zimad,Area 51″, Mixed media on unstretched canvas, 83″ x 82″

And Nite Owl, pictured below with exhibition information —

The exhibition continues through September 16 from 1 pm to 5 pm. Private viewings are available by appointment. Guests can RSVP here.

Note: Be sure to check out the exhibition catalog for bios, prices and more!

Photos of artworks,  2-7,  Lois Stavsky

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Wildly passionate and distinctly knowledgeable about about sticker art, DC-based iwillnot has published two celebrated books and has curated five extraordinarily impressive expos on the theme. On my recent visit to DC, I had the opportunity to pose a few questions to him and catch up a bit:

Since you first introduced me to the DC street art sticker scene about 14 years ago, your contributions to the culture have been enormous — expos, books, giveaways and more. What is it about stickers that appeal to you?

I love that they are a quick and easy way to get a message — or simply your name — out there.

Can you tell us something about your name — “iwillnot?”  When did you acquire it? And why did you choose it?

I began using iwillnot in 2009. It was a statement of defiance and opposition. I didn’t like what was happening around me. I could not support the direction DC was taking, particularly in terms of its gentrification. And I wasn’t happy with the way my neighborhood was evolving in the name of renovation and development.

You had been pasting, collecting and trading stickers for several years before you conceived of curating your first Street Sticker EXPO at The Fridge DC. What motivated you to launch such a huge project?

It was a natural progression. I, myself, already had amassed a huge collection, and I knew many active sticker artists out there. It was a way to share the art form that I love with so many others and to introduce these artists to a wider audience. Also, the streets in DC had become less hospitable to stickers.

How did you initially get the word out?  Over a thousand artists have participated in your Sticker Expos.

At first it was largely word-of-mouth. We were a pretty tight group, Skam, RWK, V0xx Romana…and more. And social media, mainly Instagram and my website, are essential to getting the word out.

Your most recent Street Sticker EXPO took place during the pandemic. Did that present any distinct challenges?

Yes. It was stressful. Among the challenges was receiving and opening packages of stickers while we were all concerned with becoming infected with COVID-19…Just storing the boxes until we opened them was problematic!

Your second book, Unsmashed, features over 1200 colored photographs of stand-alone stickers from artists across the globe. How did you select which stickers to include? 

I took one sticker from each pack that I had received for the 2020 Expo. Each of these stickers was then photographed by fellow sticker artist Cheer Up, who also did the layout and design for the book.  It evolved into the ideal field guide that can easily connect anyone to the sticker art community.

Yes! It is perfect! What’s ahead?

SMASHED 2.0 is underway. It will cover the last two EXPOs, the showings at the 2020 Outsider Art Fair and Tribeca Art Night in NYC, the execution of the collage portrait and the phenomenon of sticker shows around the world.

What about EXPOs? Any ahead?

In 2023, we will celebrate our 10-year anniversary.

Congratulations! I’m looking forward to that!

Note: Be sure to check out iwillnot’s website to purchase his books and assorted merchandise. And if you’d like to receive a free sticker pack, fill out the form on this page!

All photos courtesy iwillnot; photo 2 features El Toro and Chris RWK collaboration; photo 4 – a collaboration with Mr. Zimbro

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Curated by COPE2, “Subway Art Legends,” a dynamic mix of artworks created by those icons who “rocked the trains” during the subway era of the early 80’s, continues through Tuesday at One Art Space in Tribeca. The tantalizing image featured above, China Red N.Y.C, was fashioned by the legendary Delta2 with acrylic, spray paint and paint markers. Several more infectiously rhythmic works on exhibit follow:

Bronx native TKid 170, “Old School,” Circa 1989, Redo of a classic

 Brooklyn native Dome, “NYC Subway Panel,” Enamel on metal

Bronx native Bom5, “Graffiti,”  36 x 24 in.

 Manhattan-native Part TDS, “Delta Blue,” Multimedia canvas, 12 x 16 in.

Bronx native and “Subway Art Legends” curator Cope2, “Salsa,”  36 x 36 in.

 London-native Wane One, “KNOWS,” 24 x 48 in.

Located at 23 Warren Street in Tribeca, One Art Space is open daily 1-6pm.

Photos of artworks, Lois Stavsky

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During the first wave of the pandemic, several artists — largely working separately as they painted images onto plywood — joined forces to form the Soho Renaissance Factory. A diverse selection of these original works were salvaged and are on view through Tuesday, June 28 at ChaShaMa in Union Square. The exhibition, Beautiful Barriers: Street Art Beyond Walls, also features varied customized products including apparel, accessories, and skateboards in partnership with CocoRedoux. And joining the members of the Soho Renaissance Factory are guest artists EyeanticOPTIMONYCVanessa Kreytak, and 0H10M1ke.

The image pictured above was fashioned by the indigenous American multidisciplinary artist, Konstance Patton. Several more images captured while visiting the exhibition earlier this month follow:

Contemporary painter Brendan T. McNally

Brooklyn-based African American self-taught artist Amir Diop

Brooklyn-based muralist Manuel Alejandro aka The Creator

NYC-born, Jersey City-based Sule

 The legendary OPTIMONYC, guest artist

Hand-painted apparel, a small sample

A Closing Reception will be held on June 28, 6-9pm. You can register here:

Note:

June 26, 2022 3:00pm-4:00pm
Moderated by T.K Mills, Editor-in-chief of UP Magazine
Featured artists: OPTIMONYC, Vanessa Kreytak, Eyeantic, Calicho, and Ohio Mike

Photos: Lois Stavsky

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On view through this coming Saturday, June 11 at Nahmad Contemporary is “Jean-Michel Basquiat: Art and Objecthood.” Curated by Basquiat scholar Dr. Dieter Buchhart, it is the first exhibition dedicated solely to the artist’s use of found objects and unconventional materials in his works. The image pictured above was fashioned in 1985 with acrylic, spray paint, oilstick, hardware and twine on found wood. Several more images captured on my recent visit to the gallery follow:

Untitled, 1985, Oil and oilstick on wood

Untitled (1960 Yellow Door), 1985, Oil, oilstick, Xerox collage and metal on wood door

Self-Portrait, 1985, Acrylic, oilstick and bottle caps on wood

Multiflavor, 1982, Acrylic and oilstick on canvas mounted on upcycled wood

Procession, 1986, Acrylic and wood relief on wood

Located at 980 Madison Avenue on Manhattan’s Upper East Side, Nahmad Contemporary is open Monday – Saturday
10AM – 6PM.

Photos of images: Lois Stavsky

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Showcasing an eclectic range of artworks by 60 emerging and established urban artists, the third 60 Collective Art Exhibition is a cause for celebration. Established back in 2013 by Frankie Velez and Craig Anthony Miller, the 60 Collective continues its tradition of supporting the arts and public education, as a percentage of proceeds from its sales will be donated to the local Dock Street Middle School’s art and after-school enrichment programs. For this third installment, the curators have teamed up with Executive Producer Josiane Lysius in presenting to the public a first-rate representation of contemporary urban culture.

The image featured above, “Back in the Days,” was fashioned on canvas by the always-passionate and prolific Will Power. Several more images of artworks on exhibit follow:

Bronx-based world’s first ‘Hip-Hop Comic Book’ creator and sole Keith Haring subway drawing collaborator Eric Orr, Untitled, 2019, Mixed media on wood

Japanese multimedia artist and nurse Shiro, “Heart Beat,” 2022, Spraypaint, acrylic and marker

Multimedia artist and arts educator Alice Mizrachi, “A Dream Realized,” 2022, Mixed media collage on wood

Dumbo-based artist and 60 Collective co-curator Craig Anthony Miller aka CAM, “The Pursuit of Nectar,” 2022, Mixed media on wood panel with resin

NYC-based multimedia artist LeCrue Eyebrows, “And on,” 2022. Acrylic on canvas

The prolific Staten Island-based artist Chris RWK, “Once, twice, three times forever,” 2022, Mixed media on canvas

And taking place tomorrow, Sunday, May 29, between 4-6pm at the exhibition space on 30 Washington Street is a 60 Collective curators’ talk featuring Craig Anthony Miller aka CAM and Frankie Velez.

Other future events include:

Artist Talk: Cey Adams and Eric Adams, Thursday, June 2, 6-8pm

A Poetry Tribute to the 60 Collective: Curated by Tai Allen, June 7, 6-10pm

Grand Closing Reception: Friday, June 10, 6-10pm

Photos of images 1-7: Lois Stavsky

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