Graffiti

The walls up in Inwood — home to veteran NYC writers and their guests — are a treasure trove of graffiti and graffiti history.  The image featured above was painted by native New Yorker Panic Rodriguez, who grew up writing graffiti in the 80’s. Several more images that Ana Candelaria and I captured this past Sunday follow:

Bronx-bred, Jersey City-based  Ree Vilomar 

Classic Bronx-bred writer Clyde

Veteran Uptown writers Keon and Rocky 184

Bronx-based TC5 crew member Sound7

Devils of Graffiti member Ses, who — according to my research — recently passed  

Legendary Old School writers Lava, Tony 164 and Snake 188 with (what looks like) Oops1 on top 

All of these walls can be found on and off 10th Avenue between 207th Street and 2016th Streets, off the 1 line.

Photo credits: 1-3 & 7 Ana Candelaria; 4-6 Lois Stavsky

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On view from February 7 through February 29 at the The Catholic Institute of Toulouse is Next Wave, an exhibition featuring new works by the NYC-based graffiti legend Chris Ellis aka Daze. What follows are several images of artworks from the upcoming show produced in collaboration with the art agency City Of Talents, founded by Geraud Jean Claude:

Taxi Ride, 2019, Aerosol, acrylic, oil on canvas

Undersea Dream, 2018, Acrylic on canvas

Brooklyn Sunset, 2019, Aerosol, acrylic, oil on canvas

Don’t go that way, go this way, 2019, Acrylic and aerosol on canvas

The exhibition opens on February 6 at 6:30 pm with the artist in presence and remains on view Wednesdays to Fridays from 3:30 to 8:30 PM and Saturdays from 3 to 8 PM at 31 Rue de la Fonderie in Toulouse through February 29.  To request  a digital copy of the exhibition catalog, contact Geraud Jean Claude at cityoftalents@hotmail.com,

Photos courtesy Geraud Jean Claude

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The following post is by Street Art NYC contributor Ana Candelaria

Omar Victorious and I grew up together on the Lower East Side, but 20 years had passed since we’d been in touch. And then street art reunited us – first with the Street Art  Photography Show that Omar had curated back in August at Mikey Likes It Ice Cream in the East Village and then with his hugely successful roving Shooters Street Art Scavenger Hunt. Curious about the direction his life had taken, I asked him several questions:

Before launching Shooters Street Art, what had you been up to? 

I’d started a brand called End of The Weak, which has become the longest running open mic in New York City and has had huge global impact with chapters in Belgium, Africa, China, London and Paris. We just celebrated our 19th anniversary! Eventually, though, I had to shift my focus to my education, so that I could do more for my family. I attended  a vocational technical school and obtained my certification in Network Engineering, Administration and Hardware Support. I’m also a certified Project Manager Professional.

How has your Project Manager skill set impacted your current work related to street art? 

It carries over in terms of organizational skills. I have a goal. What must I do to execute that goal? A lot of people have ideas but don’t know how to go about executing them. I’ve gained many skills — including website design, photography and video production — that enable me to accomplish my goals. I can negotiate contracts, and I understand the role finance plays in business.

How did street art come to play such a huge role in your life?

I’m from the Lower East Side, East Village, Alphabet City. I’m downtown. I woke up to tags, graffiti, murals and spots that are bombed to shit. It was the landscape of my childhood. Around ten years ago, I started taking pictures with my Blackberry, and I started a blog. I, also, came up with two hashtags: #crackimagecrew and  #cracknificent. Over a four-year period, those hashtags have gained 1400 posts on Instagram from 10-12 photographers from all around the world. That’s how I came up with the idea for the Shooters Street Art Photography Show. I reached out to everyone who was using those hashtags and asked them if they’d be interested in participating in a street art photography show. I really wanted to meet them in person and expose their talents. I wanted to recreate the vibe of my childhood. We weren’t on the Internet back in the day. We were connecting with humans. These days I’m trying to build community —  an ecosystem of people who support one another and value creativity My good friend, Mikey, has a venue downtown called Mikey Likes It, and it all fell into place.

And how did the idea of the Shooter’s Scavenger Hunt come about?

I was talking to a few artists — including SacSix and Sara Lynne Leo — at the Shooters Photography Show. I was thinking, “How can we take this further?  Let’s get out on the street and do a scavenger hunt.” And everybody was like YES!  From there everything just started clicking. And, all of a sudden, we go from 10 to 30 people. Here we are seven hunts later: SacSix, Sara Lynne Leo, Dee Dee, Raddington Falls, Praxis and Jilly Ballistic. The response has been overwhelming. People are out there having a great time — street art hunting and winning original artwork. And all they have to do is pay $5.00 and put in some hard laps on the streets. The artists are creating original one-of-a-kind pieces as prizes. That’s exciting! The kids come out; the dogs come out and everyone has fun.

What’s ahead?

The road map is already written. The idea behind Shooters is to showcase the eye behind the lens. It’s about the photographer who is capturing and delivering the content. There are so many different avenues to take and so many different genres to explore. You have photographers who shoot everything from nature to extreme sports. Just think about the potential of showcasing all of those shooters and giving them a platform? You have to respect the Shooter! Respect the Shooter! It’s not just limited to street art; it’s about photography; it’s about the eye.

Anything specifically related to street art that we can look forward to?

We are planning a Shooters app. We also plan to digitize the hunt and take it to another level. We’d like to take the hunt to new cities and get more artists involved. We’re just getting started, so if you’re a street art enthusiast who’s hungry and ready to shoot, Holla!

Interview conducted by Ana Candelaria and edited for brevity and clarity by Ana and Lois Stavsky

Photo 1 courtesy of Ana; 2 photo of Omar Victorious by Katie Godowski; photos 3-5 by Ana Candelariathe final photo features Hady Mendezwinner of artwork by SacSix and Shooters Street Art  founder Omar Victorious

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In addition to the first-rate graffiti in the vicinity of Philly’s 5th Street and Cecil B Moore, the entire city is home to a remarkable range of public art — hosting everything from striking unsanctioned interventions to hundreds of hugely impressive murals. The image featured above is the work of Philly-based Adam Crawford. Several more images I captured on my recent visit to Philadelphia follow:

Baltimore-based duo Jessie and Katey 

Philly-based crochet street and installation artist Nicole Nikolich aka Lace in the Moon

Philly-based San Salvador-born Calo Rosa

Philly-based Jes

And Philly’s iconic stikman

Photos by Lois Stavsky

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Focusing on street art, graffiti and creative urban culture, UP is a provocative cutting-edge NYC-based quarterly magazine.  Launched in spring 2019, each issue spotlights a specific theme. Its first (sold-out) issue features several articles on money-related issues, and its second highlights matters of travel and place, as they relate to urban culture.

Lower East Side-based photographer Anna Candelaria introduced me to UP, and I was impressed by its in-depth coverage of the contemporary global urban art scene. Last week, Ana joined me as I met up with its chief editor, T.K. Mills.

Can you tell us a bit about UP Magazine‘s mission?

Our mission is to provide the art community with provocative writing that reflects the critical issues of our generation. We strive to present to our readers high-quality articles that investigate, inform, and entertain. Like good art, UP Magazine is made to make you think and make you feel.

What attracted you to urban culture? Particularly street art and graffiti?

After I had received my Masters Degree in Global Affairs from NYU, I wasn’t quite sure what direction my life would take. Shortly after Trump was elected President, I decided to visit Cuba. That’s where I first discovered my love for graffiti. I kept seeing 2+2=5. It seemed to be written everywhere. At first I couldn’t figure it out, and then I realized it was a reference to George Orwell’s 1984  — which certainly seemed relevant at the time. I even got to meet the artist. From that point on, I began paying close attention to the writing on the wall!

Before launching UP Magazine, had you any experience writing on this topic for other publications?

Yes, I wrote for several platforms including Sold Magazine, Open Letter and Art Fuse. I was also hired by a company, Saga, to interview West Coast-based street artists. When the company ended up not publishing my interviews after taking a different direction, a few of us began thinking about starting a new publication that would focus on urban culture.

How did you assemble such a dedicated and talented staff? 

Awhile back, I met Vittoria Benzine, a Brooklyn-based street art journalist and personal essayist, outside McNally Jackson Bookstore in Soho. As we began talking, we discovered our common interest in urban art. She then introduced me to Christina Elia, a freelance writer with a BA in Art History Communications. From there the crew grew to close to a dozen people, including street photographer Lonnie Richards, our Director of  Videography.

You have produced two excellent issues, each over 100 pages. What were some of your challenges in seeing this through?

The biggest and main challenge is finding sponsors and raising money to make this magazine happen.

Where is Up headed?

The only direction is up. We plan to further develop and expand our print and online presence. And we are looking forward to the launch of our third edition — with its focus on community — this spring.

That sounds great! I’m certainly looking forward to your next issue. And good luck with it all!

Note: Be sure to check out Up Magazine’s website and online shop. And with the promo code streetartnyc you can purchase issue II of Up Magazine at 25% off.

Interview conducted and edited for brevity by Lois Stavsky with Anna Candelaria

Images

1 Illustration of T.K. Mills by Vanessa Kreytak

2 Cover of Issue #1 featuring artwork by Fumero

3 Spread from Issue #2,”The Banksy Tunnel,” written by Candelaria Barandiaran with photos by Sabrina Ortolani

UP pop-up in Miami

5 Photo of T.K. Mills by Gabriel Ortiz, Jr

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Under the curatorial skills and direction of NJ-based Darrius-Jabbar Sollas aka Nasty Neo, the rotating walls in Hackensack’s Union Street Park brim with bold rhythms and swooping patterns. Featured above is the work of NYC-bred, Jersey City-based Raul Rubio aka Sue Works. Several more recently-captured images follow:

New York-based Jamie Hef

Bronx native Yes One

Brooklyn-based 5PointzCreates founder Meres One

Bronx native Abe BT5

Bronx native Pase BT

Bronx Team veteran writer Jew

A segment of the park — featuring (from left to right) TenseOneMeres OneSue Works, Sade TCM, HefPase and Jew

Photos: Dani Reyes Mozeson

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Always a treasure trove of first-rate graffiti, North Philly’s 5th Street and Cecil B Moore, along with its immediate surroundings, has expanded since my last visit. There are now additional walls — curated by Tameartz —  in the new performance and event venue, Sunflower Philly. Featured above is the work of Philly-based Saoka DRR with Imse DBR to his right. What follows are several more murals that I came upon last week in the general location:

BustaImse, Desilmula, Michael Pistash and Tameartz 

Seoz

Rams

Medic

Alex25 and Veer

Easy B2B

Photos by Lois Stavsky

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The following guest poet is by Lower East Side-based photographer Ana Candelaria:

Curated by Fernando “Ski” Romero, Here & Now honors the works of Bronx graffiti legends Tats Cru a.k.a The Mural Kings and the legendary John “Crash” Matos “for laying the groundwork for so many other aspiring artists and helping establish Graffiti for the true art form that it is.” Also featured alongside Tats Cru and Crash are the works of Daze, Nick WalkerEric Orr and curator Ski. The exhibition continues through January 12 at Pop International, 195 Bowery at Spring Street.

The image feature above, Dreams Don’t Die, was fashioned by Bio Tats Cru with spray paint, markers and ink on canvas. Several more images follow:

Nicer Tats Cru, The Mattress, Acrylic and spray paint on canvas

BG 183 Tats Cru, The Night That Never Sleeps, Mixed media on canvas

Crash, Silver Color Swatch, Spray paint on canvas

Daze, The Dark Night, Oil, acrylic, spray paint on canvas

Nick Walker, RGB Supreme, Mixed media on canvas

Eric Orr, Painting, Mixed media on canvas

Fernando “Ski “Romero, Break Up, Mixed media on canvas

Gallery hours are: Monday through Saturday 10:00am to 7:00pm; Sunday 11:00am to 6:00pm or by appointment 212.533.4262.

Photos of artworks:  2-4, 7 & 8 Ana Candelaria; 1, 5 & 6 Lois Stavsky

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Curated by Museum of Graffiti co-founder Alan Ket, the museum’s exterior and the immediate environs host over a dozen murals in a range of graffiti styles. The exquisitely-crafted mural featured above was fashioned collaboratively by: Hiero Veiga, Bacon and Quake. Several more of these recent murals, captured by travel and street photographer Karin du Maire aka Street Art Nomad this past week, follow:

UK-based Lovepusher in his inimitable 3D style

Eurotrash at work, and to his left — Miami-native James Monk aka Rasterms 

Miami’s Sinse at work with Amsterdam-based calligraffiti master Niels Meulman a.k.a. Shoe‘s “Museum of Graffiti” signage looming in the background

NYC-based graff masters Ces, Yes2, Doves and Mast

Miami native Abstrk with Lima-based Entes

Photos: Karin du Maire aka Street Art Nomad 

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Opening this week in Wynwood, Miami is the Museum of Graffiti, the world’s first museum dedicated solely to graffiti art.  Fostering an understanding of the work of the pioneering graffiti artists, who started tagging in the New York subways in the early 1970s, the museum’s permanent exhibition, under the curatorial direction of Alan Ket, features paintings, photographs, mixed media sculptures, assorted memorabilia and interactive installations “that will allow visitors to travel through time and learn about the evolution of the worldwide graffiti art movement.”

Featured above is veteran all-city writer Charles Henry aka Flip One, captured back in the day by graffiti writer and photographer Flint Gennari.  Several more photos, taken by travel and street photographer Karin du Maire aka Street Art Nomad while previewing the Museum of Graffiti last week, follow:

Museum co-founder and lead curator Alan Ket

Vintage spray paint cans 

NYC-based writers Ghost aka Cousin Frank and Giz

Graffiti pioneers Mare139, Blade, Ero, Sonic Bad and Lady Pink

Masters Mare139Doze Green, Defer and JonOne

Defer , closer up

And the branding of the art form

Also featured at the Museum of Graffiti’s inaugural exhibition is a special exhibit showcasing works by Amsterdam-based calligraffiti master Niels Meulman a.k.a. Shoe. Open daily, except for Tuesday, from 11am to 7pm, the Museum of Graffiti is located in the heart of Wynwood at 299 NW 25th Street, Miami. And in addition to what is housed and takes place indoors, the exterior boasts a range of rotating murals by first-rate graffiti artists.

Photos: Karin du Maire aka Street Art Nomad 

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