Ree

T-Kid-graffiti-nyc

Last Tuesday, First Street Green Park — on the corner of Houston Street and 2nd Avenue — was home to a buoyant celebration of International Hip-Hop Day. Hosted by PeepThis and organized by Anthony Bowman and Kate Storch, the event featured legendary graffiti artists, along with hip-hop and DJing pioneers. The mural pictured above was painted by T-Kid. Here are several more images we captured:

Jerms

Jerms-graffiti-first-green-park-nyc

Doves

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Lady K Fever at work

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Andres Correa at work, to the left of Kool Kito

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Marcelo Ment — in from Brazil

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La Femme Cheri, Ree and Theresa Kim aka Resa Piece

Cheri-ree-and resa-piece-graffiti-art-nyc

The crew

Hip-Hop-International-Day-artists

Other featured New York graffiti and street art legends included: Will Power, Flint 707, Nic 707, Keo, Omni and Frank Wore Croce. The hip-hop music — featuring DJ Grand Wizard Theodore and DJJS1 — was broadcast live on Damatrix Studios.

Photo credits: 1-4 & 7  Lois Stavsky 5 & 6 Tara Murray & 8 Karin du Maire

Note: Hailed in a range of media from Wide Walls to the Huffington Post to the New York Times, our Street Art NYC App is now available for Android devices here.

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rocky184-and-kerz-graffiti

Nic 707’s InstaFame Phantom Art movement continues to bring dozens of classic writers back into NYC subway trains. Pictured above is Rocky 184 and Kerz. Here are a few more images recently captured while heading from the North Bronx to Midtown Manhattan:

Kerz

kerznyc-graffiti-art-subway-nyc

Lava

lava-graffiti-subway-nyc

Taki 183 & Easy

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Slave, FAB 5

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Ree

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Nic 707

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And a recent Nic 707 abstract

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Quik

quik-graffiti-subway-train-nyc

Photos by Lois Stavsky

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lady-k-fever-abstract-graffiti

Launched and coordinated by the West Harlem Art Fund, Fusion NY presented a series of panels, tours, performances and pop-up exhibits earlier this week – Armory Week 2016 – in various venues throughout Harlem.  Of special interest to us graffiti and street art aficionados were the panel discussion,  Basquiat Still Fly @ 55, moderated by Jeffrey Deitch and the pop-up exhibit, Street Art Gone Fusion Crazy, curated by Lady K Fever and Savona Bailey. What follows are a few more images by artists — who also use the streets as their canvas — that we captured on our visit to Street Art Gone Fusion Crazy this past Wednesday.

Bind

bind-graffiti-on-canvas-fusion-ny

Brim, Tats Cru and Share 37

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BG 183

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Ree

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Curators Lady K Fever and Savona Bailey

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First image is close-up from huge piece by Lady K Fever

Photo credits: 1-5 Dani Reyes Mozeson; 6 Lois Stavsky

Note: Hailed in a range of media from the Huffington Post to the New York Times, our Street Art NYC App is now available here for Android devices.

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ree-and-snow-graffiti-shuaspace

Currently on view at Jersey City’s Shuaspace is Street Level, an exhibit featuring works by a range of artists from Old School graffiti writers to contemporary muralists. While visiting the space this past Sunday, I had the opportunity to speak with its curator, Allison Remy Hall.

What a fun exhibit! It’s such a wonderful mix of styles and genres. How did it all come about? 

When the owners of Shuaspace, Joshua Bisset and Laura Quattrocch, met me at the previous show that I had curated, they invited me to curate in this space. I’d always wanted to curate a graffiti exhibit, and this seemed like the perfect venue and opportunity. I then contacted artists whom I knew, who put me in contact with other artists.

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Why graffiti? What draws you to graffiti?

I’ve always loved its aesthetic. I love its rawness and spontaneity.

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When and where were you first introduced to it?

My older siblings first introduced me to graffiti. I was about eight years old and living in New Haven at the time. Even as a child, I felt there was something bold and bad about it that appealed to me.

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What — would you say — is the mission of  Street Level?

It’s a celebration of the organic nature of neighborhoods. With gentrification so much of the aesthetics and social dynamics of neighborhoods have been lost.

distort-acro-graffiti-shuaspace

What was the experience of curating your first graffiti exhibit like?

It was wonderful! Everyone was so supportive and helpful and generous with their time. It was the most fun of any show I’ve curated!

Note: You can visit  Street Level, at Shuaspace this coming weekend from 1-6pm at 340 Summit Ave, a few blocks from Journal Square in Jersey City. You can also arrange a visit by contacting Alison at aremyh@gmail.com.

Photos by Lois Stavsky

1.  Ree and Snow, painted on gallery wall interspersed with black and white photographs

2. Curator Allison Remy Hall at gallery space

3. Distort and Acropainted on gallery wall interspersed with black and white photographs

4. Mr. Mustart

5. Sam Pullin aka Bedbugspainted on gallery wall interspersed with black and white photographs

Photographers on exhibit: Andrew Blumenthal, Miguel Peralta and Giovani Santoro

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noir-and-trans1-graffiti-NYC

Always a showcase for NYC — mostly veteran — writers, the always-rotating walls off the 1 train on 207th Street and 210th Street increasingly host artists from abroad. Here is a sampling of what was sighted this past week:

London-based Trans1

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London-based Noir

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NYC-based veteran writer Ree 

Ree-graffiti-inwood-nyc

Bronx-based veteran writer Rocky184

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Veteran writer Keon1, mgs gnd 

Keon1-graffiti-Inwood

Legendary Bronx-native T-Kid

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Photos 1-5 and 7 by Lois Stavsky; 6 courtesy of Keon1

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Few NYC graffiti walls change as frequently as those in Upper Manhattan’s open-air gallery.  Curated by South Bronx native, Crane, the walls off the 1 train on 207th Street and 210th Street serve as revolving canvases to several veteran NYC writers and their occasional guests.  Here’s a sampling of what has surfaced in the past several months:

Uptown stylemaster Cone

cone

Veteran graffiti writer Kool Kito

Kool Kito

Local artist Panic Rodriguez

"Panic Rodrigues"

LA-based graffiti writer Jero ICR  

Jero

Legendary UK graffiti writer Pulse

pulse

Veteran graffiti writer Ree

Ree

Photos 1, 2, 5 and 6 by Lois Stavsky; 3 and 4 by City-as-School intern Travis Hicks

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