Bronx

While down in Miami, I met up with Bronx native Mastro whose masterful graffiti designs and styles can be found on walls, hats and a range of surfaces throughout NYC, Miami and beyond. 

mastro graffiti the Bronx nyc The Masterful Mastro on Graffiti, the Business of Art, Life on the Road, Social Media and more

Can you recall any early graffiti memories?

My earliest memory is riding the 6 train to Pre-K. Everything around me was bombed. I remember thinking, “What is this magic?” Growing up in the Bronx, I saw classic NYC graffiti everywhere. Seen, Mad and Pjay were among the writers I saw on my day-to-day commute.

When and where did you first hit the streets?

When I was in 5th grade, I started with stupid, little tags – like Shadow and Ace – all along Zerega Avenue. I was also getting up in my school. I thought I was “King!” But I was a toy.

What inspired you to get up?

Graffiti was everywhere. How could I not?

mastro graff miami The Masterful Mastro on Graffiti, the Business of Art, Life on the Road, Social Media and more

When and how did you come up with the name Mastro?

I was in my mid-teens. It was actually part of my name, and none of the aliases made any sense.

Did you paint with a crew back then or were you largely alone?

I generally liked to keep it solo and quiet.

And thse days?

I paint both solo and with others. But I don’t think the crew should define the writer. Rather, the writer should define the crew.

mastro and eskae graffiti miami The Masterful Mastro on Graffiti, the Business of Art, Life on the Road, Social Media and more

Do you have a formal art education?

Yes. I have a BA in Architecture from Pratt.

Did you go on to work as an architect?

After I graduated, I worked as an architect for a while. But at the same time I began customizing hats. And that business took off almost immediately – and was a lot more fun!  I thought, “Why should I work for someone else when I can do better on my own?”

And just how are you doing on your own?

I’m doing great. I never expected my business to go this far. Besides customizing hats, I get paid to do body painting and lettering. And I’m also commissioned to produce graffiti murals and installations.

mastro greenpoint The Masterful Mastro on Graffiti, the Business of Art, Life on the Road, Social Media and more

What would you say is the key to your success?

It’s a matter of my being in the right place at the right time. And that is something I work on doing.

Although you are based in NYC, you seem to spend more time on the road then you do back home.

Yes, I’ve been traveling just about full-time across the U.S. I try to cover as many music/art festivals and fairs that I possibly can. I tend to hang out where there are lots of people all the time.

What are some of the challenges of leading such a nomadic life?

The biggest challenge is having to do my own laundry.

mastro graffiti bronx The Masterful Mastro on Graffiti, the Business of Art, Life on the Road, Social Media and more

As you didn’t forge a career as an architect, would you way that your Pratt education was worthwhile?

Yes! It definitely taught me how to become a better artist. But it did not teach me how to sell my technique.

How does your family feel about what you are doing?

My parents get a kick out of it!

What percentage of your time is devoted to art?

Technically – all of it. I create non-stop both on and off the wall.  My art is my “work.” The only aspect of it that actually feels like work is when I’m moving and lifting materials.

mastro graffiti style miami The Masterful Mastro on Graffiti, the Business of Art, Life on the Road, Social Media and more

What advice would you offer young artists who would like to build a successful art business?

Always have access to your presentation portfolio. Be prepared to share it with anyone at any time. Know how to write a proposal, a contract and a rider sheet. And be ready to easily accept all types of payment from credit cards to PayPal.

How do you feel about the role of the Internet and social media in this scene?

I don’t like the Internet. I don’t like having to use technology to promote myself. But I can’t deny that it does increase recognition, awareness and sales.

That would seem to be a good thing.

But social media can easily turn you into a techno-slut. Too many people seem to depend on social media to increase their value. It’s your work that should be valued, not your number of “likes” or followers. Back when I first started, we did it for the love of it; now folks do it for the “likes.” And back in the day, you had no idea what a writer in Australia was doing unless you saw it in a magazine. These days, it is just far too easy to borrow and regurgitate styles from half way around the world.

mastro graffiti tracks The Masterful Mastro on Graffiti, the Business of Art, Life on the Road, Social Media and more

Are there any particular cultures – or artists — that have influenced your aesthetic?

Growing up in the Morris Park section of the Bronx, I was influenced, of course, by everything that was happening around me – graffiti, hip-hop, breakdancing. The artist who had the hugest influence on my aesthetic was Wane COD, a master of intricate simplicity.

What are your favorite places to paint?

Abandoned places that are withering away, and those places that have stood the test of time where nature is flourishing

How has your artwork evolved in the past few years?

I’m trying to make it crisper and smoother. I would like all demographics to be able to understand my writing.

mastro bushwick graffiti The Masterful Mastro on Graffiti, the Business of Art, Life on the Road, Social Media and more

What do you see as the role of the artist in society?

I’m here to create. I don’t think about it.

What’s ahead?

Building and creating wherever life takes me. Living my life as a “permanent vacation,” earning money doing what I love.

Note: Photos are of artworks seen in NYC and in Miami. Pictured in the third photo are: Mastro, Eskae and Disem – with Mastro and Eskae trading names.

Photo credits: 1-3, 7 & 8  Lois Stavsky; 4 & 5 Tara Murray; and 6 Mastro; interview conducted and edited by Lois Stavsky

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rocko the art of peace Lady K Fever Curates <em>The Art of Peace</em> at Al Iman Community Center with Rocko, BG183, Meres, Chris Riggs, Scratch, Lexi Bella and more

Curated by Lady K Fever and hosted by Aldo Perez, Ihe Art of Peace, an exhibit of mural and graffiti art celebrating peace, opens tonight at the Al Iman Community Center. I had the opportunity to speak to Lady K Fever while visiting the space at 2006 Westchester Avenue earlier this week.

BG 183 the art of piece mural art Lady K Fever Curates <em>The Art of Peace</em> at Al Iman Community Center with Rocko, BG183, Meres, Chris Riggs, Scratch, Lexi Bella and more

Can you tell us something about the concept behind this exhibit?

It is an exploration of the notion of peace from the perspective of artists representing a range of ideologies, nationalities, religious backgrounds and ethnicities. The title is a take on The Art of War by Sun Tzu written in the 6th century B.C.

meres the art of peace graffiti Lady K Fever Curates <em>The Art of Peace</em> at Al Iman Community Center with Rocko, BG183, Meres, Chris Riggs, Scratch, Lexi Bella and more

What inspired it?

It was inspired by Peace December, an organization started five years ago dedicating the month of December to celebrating peace. As Sheikh Musa Drammeh of Peace December contends, trillions of dollars are spent on defense and none are allocated to promoting peace. 

chris riggs graffiti art Lady K Fever Curates <em>The Art of Peace</em> at Al Iman Community Center with Rocko, BG183, Meres, Chris Riggs, Scratch, Lexi Bella and more

As curator, how did you decide which artists to engage in this exhibit? 

When Aldo Perez approached me to curate it, I sought artists from a range of backgrounds and communities. Many, in fact, had already been engaged in community-based projects promoting co-existence.

scratch and lady k fever the art of peace Lady K Fever Curates <em>The Art of Peace</em> at Al Iman Community Center with Rocko, BG183, Meres, Chris Riggs, Scratch, Lexi Bella and more

What were some of the particular challenges you faced in curating this exhibit?

My main concern was that the imagry would not offend the community. I also had to keep the artists’ egos in check, reminding them that The Art of Peace’s principal mission is to promote peace. And I was working with a limited budget.

lexi bella envision peace Lady K Fever Curates <em>The Art of Peace</em> at Al Iman Community Center with Rocko, BG183, Meres, Chris Riggs, Scratch, Lexi Bella and more

The exhibit opens this evening from 6-10pm. How might folks — who can’t make it this evening — see it?

Yes, there will be a reception tonight with DJ Prince Tafari, the artists and special guests — including Assemblyman Jose Rivera. There will also be select artworks for sale. Folks who won’t be able to attend can email artists4peacebx@gmail.com and arrange a time to visit The Art of Peace.

the art of peace Lady K Fever Curates <em>The Art of Peace</em> at Al Iman Community Center with Rocko, BG183, Meres, Chris Riggs, Scratch, Lexi Bella and more

Images:

1.  Rocko 

2. BG183, Tats Cru with Lady K Fever and Aldo Perez posed in front

3. Meres One

4. Chris Riggs

5. Scratch and Lady K Fever

6. Lexi Bella

Interview and photos by Lois Stavsky

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rime jersey joe graffiti bronx nyc1 <em>Writers Block</em> up in the Bronx: Rime, Mastro, Curve, Spot, Yes 1, Uncle Ro, Wen Cod, Rath, Danielle Mastrion, Lexi Bella, Ces and more

For the past several days, over two dozen artists — from writers to muralists —  have been busily transforming a huge block along Boone Avenue at 174th Street. Here are a few more images that we captured these past two days from Writers Block organized by Wen Cod:

Mastro

mastro graffiti the Bronx nyc <em>Writers Block</em> up in the Bronx: Rime, Mastro, Curve, Spot, Yes 1, Uncle Ro, Wen Cod, Rath, Danielle Mastrion, Lexi Bella, Ces and more

Curve

curvazoid graffiti bronx nyc <em>Writers Block</em> up in the Bronx: Rime, Mastro, Curve, Spot, Yes 1, Uncle Ro, Wen Cod, Rath, Danielle Mastrion, Lexi Bella, Ces and more

Spot and Acne aka Young Socrates

spot and young socrates graffiti LIC <em>Writers Block</em> up in the Bronx: Rime, Mastro, Curve, Spot, Yes 1, Uncle Ro, Wen Cod, Rath, Danielle Mastrion, Lexi Bella, Ces and more

Yes 1 at work 

yes1 paints bronx graffiti nyc <em>Writers Block</em> up in the Bronx: Rime, Mastro, Curve, Spot, Yes 1, Uncle Ro, Wen Cod, Rath, Danielle Mastrion, Lexi Bella, Ces and more

Nero aka Uncle Ro

uncle ro graffiti bronx nyc <em>Writers Block</em> up in the Bronx: Rime, Mastro, Curve, Spot, Yes 1, Uncle Ro, Wen Cod, Rath, Danielle Mastrion, Lexi Bella, Ces and more

Wen Cod, who organized the event, captured at work in the early stages yesterday morning

wen cod paints grafffiti bronx nyc <em>Writers Block</em> up in the Bronx: Rime, Mastro, Curve, Spot, Yes 1, Uncle Ro, Wen Cod, Rath, Danielle Mastrion, Lexi Bella, Ces and more

Rath at work

rath graffiti <em>Writers Block</em> up in the Bronx: Rime, Mastro, Curve, Spot, Yes 1, Uncle Ro, Wen Cod, Rath, Danielle Mastrion, Lexi Bella, Ces and more

Danielle Mastrion, Lexi Bella, and Doc TC5 to the far right

Danielle Mastrion Lexi Bella doctc5 <em>Writers Block</em> up in the Bronx: Rime, Mastro, Curve, Spot, Yes 1, Uncle Ro, Wen Cod, Rath, Danielle Mastrion, Lexi Bella, Ces and more

Ces checks it out

ces graffiti bronx nyc <em>Writers Block</em> up in the Bronx: Rime, Mastro, Curve, Spot, Yes 1, Uncle Ro, Wen Cod, Rath, Danielle Mastrion, Lexi Bella, Ces and more

 Note: First image features Jersey Joe aka Rime

Photo credits: 1-4 & 6-9 Lois Stavsky; 5 & 10 Tara Murray

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This past Saturday, David Gonzalez, award-winning journalist, photographer and co-editor of the New York Times photoblog, Lens, led a group of Instagramers on a walk through Hunts Point, introducing us to works by some of its legendary graffiti artists and muralists. Here are a few images StreetArtNYC captured on Instagram:

Tats Cru with How and Nosm, close-up

tats cru graffiti street art NYTBronxWalk NYC David Gonzalez Guides a <em>New York Times</em> Photo Walk in Hunts Point: Tats Cru, How & Nosm, Ces, Daze, Crash and more

Nicer, Tats Cru with Instagramer Sarah Sansom aka catscoffeecreativity seated

nicer graffiti street art NYT Bronx Walk NYC David Gonzalez Guides a <em>New York Times</em> Photo Walk in Hunts Point: Tats Cru, How & Nosm, Ces, Daze, Crash and more

Ces

ces street art nytBronxWalk NYC David Gonzalez Guides a <em>New York Times</em> Photo Walk in Hunts Point: Tats Cru, How & Nosm, Ces, Daze, Crash and more

Daze

Daze graffiti NYTBronxWalk NYC David Gonzalez Guides a <em>New York Times</em> Photo Walk in Hunts Point: Tats Cru, How & Nosm, Ces, Daze, Crash and more

Crash, who also shared some Hunts Point history with us, in front of his mural

Crash graffiti NYTBronxWalk NYC David Gonzalez Guides a <em>New York Times</em> Photo Walk in Hunts Point: Tats Cru, How & Nosm, Ces, Daze, Crash and more

David Gonzalez leads the way to the Point, Tats Cru‘s headquarters

David Gonzalez the Point graffiti NYTBronxWalk NYC David Gonzalez Guides a <em>New York Times</em> Photo Walk in Hunts Point: Tats Cru, How & Nosm, Ces, Daze, Crash and more

Artist-at-work at the Point

graffiti The Point NYTBronxWalk NYC David Gonzalez Guides a <em>New York Times</em> Photo Walk in Hunts Point: Tats Cru, How & Nosm, Ces, Daze, Crash and more

David Gonzalez (left), Whitney Richardson (center), James Estrin (right) and Kerri MacDonald (top) of The New York Times at the Point

David Gonzalez Whitney Richardson James Estrin Kerri MacDonald NYTBronxWalk NYC David Gonzalez Guides a <em>New York Times</em> Photo Walk in Hunts Point: Tats Cru, How & Nosm, Ces, Daze, Crash and more

Renowned photojournalist Martha Cooper, also on the walk, shared with us some photos she had taken of the trains in key spots over 30 years ago, and she captured us all here.

Note: You can check out the Instagram hashtag #NYTBronxWalk for more images from Saturday’s tour.

Photos by Lois Stavsky

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trans1 street art mural Bronx From Across the Universe to <em>Graffiti Universe</em> in the East Bronx: Trans1, Jorit, Vins & Signl ESO and Stay One KD

Currently gracing the walls of Graffiti Universe up in the Bronx is a range of styles from photorealistic portraiture to stylish graffiti. Here is a sampling of the work fashioned by both international and regional artists:

Italian artist Jorit does the legendary TAKI 183

Jorit street art Taki183 NYC From Across the Universe to <em>Graffiti Universe</em> in the East Bronx: Trans1, Jorit, Vins & Signl ESO and Stay One KD

Vins and Signl, EOS 

vins and signl graffiti Bronx NYC From Across the Universe to <em>Graffiti Universe</em> in the East Bronx: Trans1, Jorit, Vins & Signl ESO and Stay One KD

Norwegian artist Stay One, KD

Stayone kd graffiti nyc From Across the Universe to <em>Graffiti Universe</em> in the East Bronx: Trans1, Jorit, Vins & Signl ESO and Stay One KD

Graffiti Universe is located at 2995 Boston Road in the Allerton section of the East Bronx.

Note: First image is by London-based Trans1

Photos by Lois Stavsky

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For over three decades Bronx native Just One has been making his mark on NYC public and private spaces. We recently had the opportunity to speak to the prolific artist.

Just One graffiti Bushwick NYC Speaking with Bronx Based Just One

When did you first get up? And where?

It was back in 1984 — over 30 years ago — in the West Farms section of the Bronx. I was 14 at the time.

What inspired you to do so?

My older brother and his friends were all doing it. It was the natural thing to do.

Any early memories that stand out?

I was at a handball court in Crotona Park when the spray can I was holding in my hand almost burst into flames.

How did that happen?

It came into contact with a cigarette lighter, and could have easily blown up.

We’re glad it didn’t! We’ve noticed your work in quite a few projects these days – from JMZ Walls in Bushwick, Brooklyn to Operation Skittles at August Martin High School in Jamaica, Queens. Do you prefer legal or illegal surfaces?

I love painting anywhere – but to experience the full essence of graffiti, there is nothing like painting on a surface I discover on my own. Finding a space, being there alone and creating something out of nothing is the ultimate experience.

just one JMZ Walls graffiti NYC Speaking with Bronx Based Just One

Have you ever been arrested for graffiti?

No!

How’s that?

I have good instincts.

What was the riskiest graffiti-related thing you’ve ever done? And why did you do it?

Hitting an elevated abandoned train line, where I had to hop over each wall to do another letter. Why did I do it? I’d been eyeballing that spot for quite awhile and nobody else took it, so I’d figure I’d take my chance. And, yes, it was worth it!

How does your family feel about what you are doing?

My children love it!

What percentage of your day is devoted to your art these days?

About 70%.

Just graffiti three pieces1 Speaking with Bronx Based Just One

What keeps you painting after all these years?

Passion and the adrenalin rush!  It also relieves my stress.

Any thoughts on the graffiti/ street art divide?

I, myself, prefer the movement and flow of graffiti. But art is art. And street art can be beautiful.

How do you feel about the movement of graffiti and street art into galleries? Have you shown your work in galleries?

I don’t have a problem with that. It’s a good thing! I’ve shown at the Jeffrey Leder Gallery in Long Island City and in bars and other alternative spaces around town.

Do you prefer working alone or collaborating with others?

Both.

Is there anyone in particular you would like to collaborate with?

I’d like to paint with Mitch 77, Jamie Hef and Lee Quinones.

just one graffiti street art mural NYC Speaking with Bronx Based Just One

Do you rep any crews?

TMC, TFO, KD, COA and I’m the prez of WF, World Famous Crew.

How you feel about the role of the Internet in this scene?

It can be too much. When it gets too much into your business, it’s bad.

Do you have a formal arts education?

I’m self-taught, but my teachers always encouraged me to draw.

Do you work with a sketch in your hand or do you let it flow?

I freestyle.

Are you generally satisfied with your work?

Most of the time!

Just one graffiti august martin high school nyc Speaking with Bronx Based Just One

How has your work evolved in the past few years?

It’s sharper and neater. And I work much faster.

What do you see as the role of the artist in society?

To inspire others to express themselves.

How do you feel about the photographers in this scene?

The more exposure our works get, the better for us.

What do you see as the future of graffiti? Where is it going?

It will continue to evolve.

And what about you? What’s ahead for you?

I plan to keep painting.  And I want to get back into the canvas scene and hopefully — sometime soon — do a solo show.

Interview by Lois Stavsky with City-As-School intern Diana Davidovaphotos: 1, 3-5 courtesy of Just; 2 & 6 (with Awez) Lois Stavsky

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lady k Fever with graffiti writers <em>No Longer Empty</em> Presents <em>A Timeline of Handstyles: Signatures from the 1960s to Present Day</em> Across from Old Bronx Borough Courthouse

Conceived and curated by Lady K FeverA Timeline of Handstyles: Signatures from the 1960′s to Present Day, presents an extraordinary array of writers’ signatures spanning three generations. While visiting the space — across from the Old Bronx Borough Courthouse – I had the opportunity to speak to Lady K.

I love this! There is so much history here. What prompted you to organize this?

When I first hit the streets, I did so as a tagger. And the first book I ever read on this culture, The Faith of Graffiti, alerted me to the significance of the tag. On a more personal level, this wall is also my way of paying homage to the old school writers who were so supportive of me when I first moved to NYC.

Charmin65 and Swan3 Old School Writers Time line of handstyles <em>No Longer Empty</em> Presents <em>A Timeline of Handstyles: Signatures from the 1960s to Present Day</em> Across from Old Bronx Borough Courthouse

This wall serves as a canvas for early legends, as well as for some of the new artists on the scene. How did you get the word out?

I spoke to a number of writers from different generations, and asked them to invite others.

Stella handstyle <em>No Longer Empty</em> Presents <em>A Timeline of Handstyles: Signatures from the 1960s to Present Day</em> Across from Old Bronx Borough Courthouse

Nicholai Khan handstyle <em>No Longer Empty</em> Presents <em>A Timeline of Handstyles: Signatures from the 1960s to Present Day</em> Across from Old Bronx Borough Courthouse

What were some of the challenges you faced in curating this?

Figuring out the logistics of it all, engaging younger writers, and dealing with the inevitable politics.

Dun one handstyle <em>No Longer Empty</em> Presents <em>A Timeline of Handstyles: Signatures from the 1960s to Present Day</em> Across from Old Bronx Borough Courthouse

Meek hand style <em>No Longer Empty</em> Presents <em>A Timeline of Handstyles: Signatures from the 1960s to Present Day</em> Across from Old Bronx Borough Courthouse

Were there any particular surprises?

Folks rumored to be dead suddenly surfaced! Seeing Swan 3 was, perhaps, the biggest surprise! What a pleasure that was! And I was surprised — and delighted — that so many folks were willing to travel here from afar to tag this wall.

Broham 380 handstyle <em>No Longer Empty</em> Presents <em>A Timeline of Handstyles: Signatures from the 1960s to Present Day</em> Across from Old Bronx Borough Courthouse

What’s next?

I’d love to curate a huge warehouse and engage far more people.

Handstyles complete <em>No Longer Empty</em> Presents <em>A Timeline of Handstyles: Signatures from the 1960s to Present Day</em> Across from Old Bronx Borough Courthouse

Timeline LadyK <em>No Longer Empty</em> Presents <em>A Timeline of Handstyles: Signatures from the 1960s to Present Day</em> Across from Old Bronx Borough Courthouse

The mural will remain on view through the end of this month — with a special public viewing on Sunday, June 28, 1:00 pm – 6:00 pm.

Note: Special thanks to Delicioso Coco Helado for providing the space and supporting the project.

Photos: 1-7 Lois Stavsky; 8 & 9 Lady K Fever

Note: Photo 2 features Charmin 65 and Swan 3; photo 3 Stella Isabella; photo 4 Nicholai Khan; photo 5 Dun One; photo 6 Meek; photo 7 Broham380

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Babe Ruth, Derek Jeter, Roberto Clemente and Satchel Paige are among the legendary baseball players whose faces now grace a range of storefronts on and off River Avenue from 158th Street to 162nd Street. A partnership between the 161st Street Business Improvement District and 501 See Streets, this particular project is one of several initiated by 501 See Streets founder and director, Noah Sheroff. I recently met up with Noah to find out more about him and his Paint New York project.

danielle mariano street art Bronx NYC Noah Sheroff on <em>501 See Streets</em>: Revitalizing and Beautifying Communities through Public Art with Danielle Mastrion, Lexi Bella and Andre Trenier

You are on a mission to bring public art to neighborhoods in NYC and beyond. What spurred your interest in street art?

I grew up in a neighborhood that was largely void of art. When I first visited 5Pointz in 2011, I was struck by the beauty and energy of it all. The following year I went on a tour of the Bushwick Collective, and soon after that, I discovered the Welling Court Mural Project in Astoria, Queens.  By then I was hooked!  I knew that I wanted to bring art murals to communities that wouldn’t otherwise have them. 

Danielle Mastrion shutter Noah Sheroff on <em>501 See Streets</em>: Revitalizing and Beautifying Communities through Public Art with Danielle Mastrion, Lexi Bella and Andre Trenier

We are familiar with the murals you facilitated that have transformed the blocks around Yankee Stadium.  Have you engaged other neighborhoods?

Yes. Danielle Mastrion painted a mural on Flatbush Avenue and Avenue H in Brooklyn; Miss Zukie collaborated with John Paul O’Grodnick on Benson Street.across from the Lewis & Clark School, and Marthalicia painted on Jerome Avenue and East 198th Street.

Lexi Bella Derek jeter street art Bronx NYC Noah Sheroff on <em>501 See Streets</em>: Revitalizing and Beautifying Communities through Public Art with Danielle Mastrion, Lexi Bella and Andre Trenier

What are some of the challenges you’ve encountered?

It’s been a daunting learning experience!  The community members are often apprehensive. Artists tend to question my motives. And the funders are hesitant to fund “a new kid on the block.” 

Andre Trenier roberto Clemente street art Bronx Noah Sheroff on <em>501 See Streets</em>: Revitalizing and Beautifying Communities through Public Art with Danielle Mastrion, Lexi Bella and Andre Trenier

What seems to be the main concern of the community?

They are concerned about the content – about offending the sensibilities of the folks who live in the neighborhood.  That is one of the reasons artists are often asked to submit a sketch first. 

Lexi Bella 501 See Streets street art Bronx NYC Noah Sheroff on <em>501 See Streets</em>: Revitalizing and Beautifying Communities through Public Art with Danielle Mastrion, Lexi Bella and Andre Trenier

You are in the process of forging alliances with several Business Improvement Districts. Are they generally receptive?

Yes, the BIDs are generally receptive. They see the art as a way to highlight their businesses, bring commerce to their neighborhoods and attract tourists. I am also forging partnerships with civics and other neighborhood organizations.

Andre Trenier Satchel Paige Bronx NYC Noah Sheroff on <em>501 See Streets</em>: Revitalizing and Beautifying Communities through Public Art with Danielle Mastrion, Lexi Bella and Andre Trenier

What’s ahead?

I’m interested in expanding Paint New York into more neighborhoods and working with a range of community groups. And at this point, fundraising is essential to cover expenses and to pay the artists for their talents and time.

Good luck! And we are looking forward to 501 See Streets bringing more art to our streets!

Note:  Find out how you can help support Noah’s project here

Interview by Lois StavskyImages 1 & 2 Danielle Mastrion; 3 & 5 Lexi Bella; 4 & 6 Andre Trenier; photo credits 1 & 2 Lois Stavsky; 3-6 City-As-School intern Diana Davidova

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Deborah Fisher Paul Ramirez Jones <em>No Longer Empty</em> Transforms Former Bronx Borough Courthouse: Deborah Fisher & Paul Ramirez Jonas, Teresa Diehl, Shellyne Rodriguez, David Scanavino, Ellen Harvey, Lady K Fever and more

Almost 40 years ago the historic Old Bronx Courthouse building closed its doors. This past Thursday evening, the landmark structure reopened to host When You Cut Into the Present the Future Leaks Out, a thoroughly engaging multi-media exhibit, curated by Regine Basha for No Longer Empty Featuring over two dozen artists on three levels, its title references the remix suggested by William S. Boroughs. Here are a few more images captured on Thursday:

Teresa DiehlL-Alber-Into, Video and sound installation

Teresa Diehl <em>No Longer Empty</em> Transforms Former Bronx Borough Courthouse: Deborah Fisher & Paul Ramirez Jonas, Teresa Diehl, Shellyne Rodriguez, David Scanavino, Ellen Harvey, Lady K Fever and more

 Another view of  Teresa Diehl‘s ever-transforming hallucinatory musical installation

Diehl <em>No Longer Empty</em> Transforms Former Bronx Borough Courthouse: Deborah Fisher & Paul Ramirez Jonas, Teresa Diehl, Shellyne Rodriguez, David Scanavino, Ellen Harvey, Lady K Fever and more

Shellyne RodriguezPrototype For Belphegor’s Eye, 168 flesh-tint dyed mousetraps, rhinestones, gold chains, copper wire, plywood

Shellyne <em>No Longer Empty</em> Transforms Former Bronx Borough Courthouse: Deborah Fisher & Paul Ramirez Jonas, Teresa Diehl, Shellyne Rodriguez, David Scanavino, Ellen Harvey, Lady K Fever and more

Shellyne RodriguezGeperudeta, Ceramic

Shellyne Rodriguez Geperudeta <em>No Longer Empty</em> Transforms Former Bronx Borough Courthouse: Deborah Fisher & Paul Ramirez Jonas, Teresa Diehl, Shellyne Rodriguez, David Scanavino, Ellen Harvey, Lady K Fever and more

David Scanavino, Untitled, Linoleum tile

David scanvino tile installation <em>No Longer Empty</em> Transforms Former Bronx Borough Courthouse: Deborah Fisher & Paul Ramirez Jonas, Teresa Diehl, Shellyne Rodriguez, David Scanavino, Ellen Harvey, Lady K Fever and more

Ellen HarveyAlien Souvenir Stand (close-up), Oil on aluminum, watercolor on gesso board, propane tanks, plywood, aluminum siding and poles, aluminum diamond plate, magnets

ellen harvey alien souveneir stand <em>No Longer Empty</em> Transforms Former Bronx Borough Courthouse: Deborah Fisher & Paul Ramirez Jonas, Teresa Diehl, Shellyne Rodriguez, David Scanavino, Ellen Harvey, Lady K Fever and more

Lady K FeverAll Rise (close-up), Mylar on façade of  building

Lady K Fever Old Court House <em>No Longer Empty</em> Transforms Former Bronx Borough Courthouse: Deborah Fisher & Paul Ramirez Jonas, Teresa Diehl, Shellyne Rodriguez, David Scanavino, Ellen Harvey, Lady K Fever and more

The exhibit continues through July 19, along with a variety of programs ranging from fashion shows to presentations by such Bronx-based artists as Eric Orr, Per One and Joe Conzo. The old Bronx Courthouse is located at 878 Brook Avenue at East 161 Street and Third Avenue in the South Bronx. 

Note: First photo features Deborah Fisher and Paul Ramirez Jonas, Something for Nothing, Mixed media, Custom designed neon sign

Research for this post by City-As-School student Diana Davidova; photos 1, 5, and 7 Diana Davidova; 2-4, 6 and 8 Lois Stavsky

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Boone Room Bronx graffiti Cope2 Celebrating the Launch of the Boone Room Website Tonight at Exit Room

Some of NYC’s most vibrant and striking murals–on Boone Avenue between 172nd and 173rd Streets in the Bronx–were demolished last year to be replaced by residential buildings. But thanks to the efforts of SLO Architecture, various artists, neighboring Fannie Lou Hamer High School, Maria Krajewski, City-As-School students and several others, the spirit of Boone Avenue lives. Featuring dozens of images, interviews and more, the Boone Room website, constructed by City-As-School students, can now be viewed online. To celebrate its launch, the public is invited to join the City-As-School family, several of the artists and a host of performers and musicians tonight at Exit Room.

 Artists interviewed for the Boone Room website include: Cope2, Eric Orr, Marthalecia and Valerie Larko who has preserved the walls in her amazing photorealistic paintings.

Screen Shot 2015 04 14 at 3.59.41 PM.png Celebrating the Launch of the Boone Room Website Tonight at Exit Room

Lady K Fever

Lady K Fever graffiti Bronx NYC Celebrating the Launch of the Boone Room Website Tonight at Exit Room

Kashink — who was visiting NYC from Paris — to the left of Lady K Fever

Kashink Lady K Fever Street Art graffiti Bronx NYC Celebrating the Launch of the Boone Room Website Tonight at Exit Room

 Tonight at 270 Meserole Street in Bushwick

Boone Room Launch Party Celebrating the Launch of the Boone Room Website Tonight at Exit Room

Post by City-As-School intern Zachariah Messaoud with Lois Stavsky; photos 3 and 4 courtesy Maria Krajewski

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