Bronx

trans1 street art mural Bronx From Across the Universe to <em>Graffiti Universe</em> in the East Bronx: Trans1, Jorit, Vins & Signl ESO and Stay One KD

Currently gracing the walls of Graffiti Universe up in the Bronx is a range of styles from photorealistic portraiture to stylish graffiti. Here is a sampling of the work fashioned by both international and regional artists:

Italian artist Jorit does the legendary TAKI 183

Jorit street art Taki183 NYC From Across the Universe to <em>Graffiti Universe</em> in the East Bronx: Trans1, Jorit, Vins & Signl ESO and Stay One KD

Vins and Signl, EOS 

vins and signl graffiti Bronx NYC From Across the Universe to <em>Graffiti Universe</em> in the East Bronx: Trans1, Jorit, Vins & Signl ESO and Stay One KD

Norwegian artist Stay One, KD

Stayone kd graffiti nyc From Across the Universe to <em>Graffiti Universe</em> in the East Bronx: Trans1, Jorit, Vins & Signl ESO and Stay One KD

Graffiti Universe is located at 2995 Boston Road in the Allerton section of the East Bronx.

Note: First image is by London-based Trans1

Photos by Lois Stavsky

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For over three decades Bronx native Just One has been making his mark on NYC public and private spaces. We recently had the opportunity to speak to the prolific artist.

Just One graffiti Bushwick NYC Speaking with Bronx Based Just One

When did you first get up? And where?

It was back in 1984 — over 30 years ago — in the West Farms section of the Bronx. I was 14 at the time.

What inspired you to do so?

My older brother and his friends were all doing it. It was the natural thing to do.

Any early memories that stand out?

I was at a handball court in Crotona Park when the spray can I was holding in my hand almost burst into flames.

How did that happen?

It came into contact with a cigarette lighter, and could have easily blown up.

We’re glad it didn’t! We’ve noticed your work in quite a few projects these days – from JMZ Walls in Bushwick, Brooklyn to Operation Skittles at August Martin High School in Jamaica, Queens. Do you prefer legal or illegal surfaces?

I love painting anywhere – but to experience the full essence of graffiti, there is nothing like painting on a surface I discover on my own. Finding a space, being there alone and creating something out of nothing is the ultimate experience.

just one JMZ Walls graffiti NYC Speaking with Bronx Based Just One

Have you ever been arrested for graffiti?

No!

How’s that?

I have good instincts.

What was the riskiest graffiti-related thing you’ve ever done? And why did you do it?

Hitting an elevated abandoned train line, where I had to hop over each wall to do another letter. Why did I do it? I’d been eyeballing that spot for quite awhile and nobody else took it, so I’d figure I’d take my chance. And, yes, it was worth it!

How does your family feel about what you are doing?

My children love it!

What percentage of your day is devoted to your art these days?

About 70%.

Just graffiti three pieces1 Speaking with Bronx Based Just One

What keeps you painting after all these years?

Passion and the adrenalin rush!  It also relieves my stress.

Any thoughts on the graffiti/ street art divide?

I, myself, prefer the movement and flow of graffiti. But art is art. And street art can be beautiful.

How do you feel about the movement of graffiti and street art into galleries? Have you shown your work in galleries?

I don’t have a problem with that. It’s a good thing! I’ve shown at the Jeffrey Leder Gallery in Long Island City and in bars and other alternative spaces around town.

Do you prefer working alone or collaborating with others?

Both.

Is there anyone in particular you would like to collaborate with?

I’d like to paint with Mitch 77, Jamie Hef and Lee Quinones.

just one graffiti street art mural NYC Speaking with Bronx Based Just One

Do you rep any crews?

TMC, TFO, KD, COA and I’m the prez of WF, World Famous Crew.

How you feel about the role of the Internet in this scene?

It can be too much. When it gets too much into your business, it’s bad.

Do you have a formal arts education?

I’m self-taught, but my teachers always encouraged me to draw.

Do you work with a sketch in your hand or do you let it flow?

I freestyle.

Are you generally satisfied with your work?

Most of the time!

Just one graffiti august martin high school nyc Speaking with Bronx Based Just One

How has your work evolved in the past few years?

It’s sharper and neater. And I work much faster.

What do you see as the role of the artist in society?

To inspire others to express themselves.

How do you feel about the photographers in this scene?

The more exposure our works get, the better for us.

What do you see as the future of graffiti? Where is it going?

It will continue to evolve.

And what about you? What’s ahead for you?

I plan to keep painting.  And I want to get back into the canvas scene and hopefully — sometime soon — do a solo show.

Interview by Lois Stavsky with City-As-School intern Diana Davidovaphotos: 1, 3-5 courtesy of Just; 2 & 6 (with Awez) Lois Stavsky

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lady k Fever with graffiti writers <em>No Longer Empty</em> Presents <em>A Timeline of Handstyles: Signatures from the 1960s to Present Day</em> Across from Old Bronx Borough Courthouse

Conceived and curated by Lady K FeverA Timeline of Handstyles: Signatures from the 1960′s to Present Day, presents an extraordinary array of writers’ signatures spanning three generations. While visiting the space — across from the Old Bronx Borough Courthouse – I had the opportunity to speak to Lady K.

I love this! There is so much history here. What prompted you to organize this?

When I first hit the streets, I did so as a tagger. And the first book I ever read on this culture, The Faith of Graffiti, alerted me to the significance of the tag. On a more personal level, this wall is also my way of paying homage to the old school writers who were so supportive of me when I first moved to NYC.

Charmin65 and Swan3 Old School Writers Time line of handstyles <em>No Longer Empty</em> Presents <em>A Timeline of Handstyles: Signatures from the 1960s to Present Day</em> Across from Old Bronx Borough Courthouse

This wall serves as a canvas for early legends, as well as for some of the new artists on the scene. How did you get the word out?

I spoke to a number of writers from different generations, and asked them to invite others.

Stella handstyle <em>No Longer Empty</em> Presents <em>A Timeline of Handstyles: Signatures from the 1960s to Present Day</em> Across from Old Bronx Borough Courthouse

Nicholai Khan handstyle <em>No Longer Empty</em> Presents <em>A Timeline of Handstyles: Signatures from the 1960s to Present Day</em> Across from Old Bronx Borough Courthouse

What were some of the challenges you faced in curating this?

Figuring out the logistics of it all, engaging younger writers, and dealing with the inevitable politics.

Dun one handstyle <em>No Longer Empty</em> Presents <em>A Timeline of Handstyles: Signatures from the 1960s to Present Day</em> Across from Old Bronx Borough Courthouse

Meek hand style <em>No Longer Empty</em> Presents <em>A Timeline of Handstyles: Signatures from the 1960s to Present Day</em> Across from Old Bronx Borough Courthouse

Were there any particular surprises?

Folks rumored to be dead suddenly surfaced! Seeing Swan 3 was, perhaps, the biggest surprise! What a pleasure that was! And I was surprised — and delighted — that so many folks were willing to travel here from afar to tag this wall.

Broham 380 handstyle <em>No Longer Empty</em> Presents <em>A Timeline of Handstyles: Signatures from the 1960s to Present Day</em> Across from Old Bronx Borough Courthouse

What’s next?

I’d love to curate a huge warehouse and engage far more people.

Handstyles complete <em>No Longer Empty</em> Presents <em>A Timeline of Handstyles: Signatures from the 1960s to Present Day</em> Across from Old Bronx Borough Courthouse

Timeline LadyK <em>No Longer Empty</em> Presents <em>A Timeline of Handstyles: Signatures from the 1960s to Present Day</em> Across from Old Bronx Borough Courthouse

The mural will remain on view through the end of this month — with a special public viewing on Sunday, June 28, 1:00 pm – 6:00 pm.

Note: Special thanks to Delicioso Coco Helado for providing the space and supporting the project.

Photos: 1-7 Lois Stavsky; 8 & 9 Lady K Fever

Note: Photo 2 features Charmin 65 and Swan 3; photo 3 Stella Isabella; photo 4 Nicholai Khan; photo 5 Dun One; photo 6 Meek; photo 7 Broham380

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Babe Ruth, Derek Jeter, Roberto Clemente and Satchel Paige are among the legendary baseball players whose faces now grace a range of storefronts on and off River Avenue from 158th Street to 162nd Street. A partnership between the 161st Street Business Improvement District and 501 See Streets, this particular project is one of several initiated by 501 See Streets founder and director, Noah Sheroff. I recently met up with Noah to find out more about him and his Paint New York project.

danielle mariano street art Bronx NYC Noah Sheroff on <em>501 See Streets</em>: Revitalizing and Beautifying Communities through Public Art with Danielle Mastrion, Lexi Bella and Andre Trenier

You are on a mission to bring public art to neighborhoods in NYC and beyond. What spurred your interest in street art?

I grew up in a neighborhood that was largely void of art. When I first visited 5Pointz in 2011, I was struck by the beauty and energy of it all. The following year I went on a tour of the Bushwick Collective, and soon after that, I discovered the Welling Court Mural Project in Astoria, Queens.  By then I was hooked!  I knew that I wanted to bring art murals to communities that wouldn’t otherwise have them. 

Danielle Mastrion shutter Noah Sheroff on <em>501 See Streets</em>: Revitalizing and Beautifying Communities through Public Art with Danielle Mastrion, Lexi Bella and Andre Trenier

We are familiar with the murals you facilitated that have transformed the blocks around Yankee Stadium.  Have you engaged other neighborhoods?

Yes. Danielle Mastrion painted a mural on Flatbush Avenue and Avenue H in Brooklyn; Miss Zukie collaborated with John Paul O’Grodnick on Benson Street.across from the Lewis & Clark School, and Marthalicia painted on Jerome Avenue and East 198th Street.

Lexi Bella Derek jeter street art Bronx NYC Noah Sheroff on <em>501 See Streets</em>: Revitalizing and Beautifying Communities through Public Art with Danielle Mastrion, Lexi Bella and Andre Trenier

What are some of the challenges you’ve encountered?

It’s been a daunting learning experience!  The community members are often apprehensive. Artists tend to question my motives. And the funders are hesitant to fund “a new kid on the block.” 

Andre Trenier roberto Clemente street art Bronx Noah Sheroff on <em>501 See Streets</em>: Revitalizing and Beautifying Communities through Public Art with Danielle Mastrion, Lexi Bella and Andre Trenier

What seems to be the main concern of the community?

They are concerned about the content – about offending the sensibilities of the folks who live in the neighborhood.  That is one of the reasons artists are often asked to submit a sketch first. 

Lexi Bella 501 See Streets street art Bronx NYC Noah Sheroff on <em>501 See Streets</em>: Revitalizing and Beautifying Communities through Public Art with Danielle Mastrion, Lexi Bella and Andre Trenier

You are in the process of forging alliances with several Business Improvement Districts. Are they generally receptive?

Yes, the BIDs are generally receptive. They see the art as a way to highlight their businesses, bring commerce to their neighborhoods and attract tourists. I am also forging partnerships with civics and other neighborhood organizations.

Andre Trenier Satchel Paige Bronx NYC Noah Sheroff on <em>501 See Streets</em>: Revitalizing and Beautifying Communities through Public Art with Danielle Mastrion, Lexi Bella and Andre Trenier

What’s ahead?

I’m interested in expanding Paint New York into more neighborhoods and working with a range of community groups. And at this point, fundraising is essential to cover expenses and to pay the artists for their talents and time.

Good luck! And we are looking forward to 501 See Streets bringing more art to our streets!

Note:  Find out how you can help support Noah’s project here

Interview by Lois StavskyImages 1 & 2 Danielle Mastrion; 3 & 5 Lexi Bella; 4 & 6 Andre Trenier; photo credits 1 & 2 Lois Stavsky; 3-6 City-As-School intern Diana Davidova

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Deborah Fisher Paul Ramirez Jones <em>No Longer Empty</em> Transforms Former Bronx Borough Courthouse: Deborah Fisher & Paul Ramirez Jonas, Teresa Diehl, Shellyne Rodriguez, David Scanavino, Ellen Harvey, Lady K Fever and more

Almost 40 years ago the historic Old Bronx Courthouse building closed its doors. This past Thursday evening, the landmark structure reopened to host When You Cut Into the Present the Future Leaks Out, a thoroughly engaging multi-media exhibit, curated by Regine Basha for No Longer Empty Featuring over two dozen artists on three levels, its title references the remix suggested by William S. Boroughs. Here are a few more images captured on Thursday:

Teresa DiehlL-Alber-Into, Video and sound installation

Teresa Diehl <em>No Longer Empty</em> Transforms Former Bronx Borough Courthouse: Deborah Fisher & Paul Ramirez Jonas, Teresa Diehl, Shellyne Rodriguez, David Scanavino, Ellen Harvey, Lady K Fever and more

 Another view of  Teresa Diehl‘s ever-transforming hallucinatory musical installation

Diehl <em>No Longer Empty</em> Transforms Former Bronx Borough Courthouse: Deborah Fisher & Paul Ramirez Jonas, Teresa Diehl, Shellyne Rodriguez, David Scanavino, Ellen Harvey, Lady K Fever and more

Shellyne RodriguezPrototype For Belphegor’s Eye, 168 flesh-tint dyed mousetraps, rhinestones, gold chains, copper wire, plywood

Shellyne <em>No Longer Empty</em> Transforms Former Bronx Borough Courthouse: Deborah Fisher & Paul Ramirez Jonas, Teresa Diehl, Shellyne Rodriguez, David Scanavino, Ellen Harvey, Lady K Fever and more

Shellyne RodriguezGeperudeta, Ceramic

Shellyne Rodriguez Geperudeta <em>No Longer Empty</em> Transforms Former Bronx Borough Courthouse: Deborah Fisher & Paul Ramirez Jonas, Teresa Diehl, Shellyne Rodriguez, David Scanavino, Ellen Harvey, Lady K Fever and more

David Scanavino, Untitled, Linoleum tile

David scanvino tile installation <em>No Longer Empty</em> Transforms Former Bronx Borough Courthouse: Deborah Fisher & Paul Ramirez Jonas, Teresa Diehl, Shellyne Rodriguez, David Scanavino, Ellen Harvey, Lady K Fever and more

Ellen HarveyAlien Souvenir Stand (close-up), Oil on aluminum, watercolor on gesso board, propane tanks, plywood, aluminum siding and poles, aluminum diamond plate, magnets

ellen harvey alien souveneir stand <em>No Longer Empty</em> Transforms Former Bronx Borough Courthouse: Deborah Fisher & Paul Ramirez Jonas, Teresa Diehl, Shellyne Rodriguez, David Scanavino, Ellen Harvey, Lady K Fever and more

Lady K FeverAll Rise (close-up), Mylar on façade of  building

Lady K Fever Old Court House <em>No Longer Empty</em> Transforms Former Bronx Borough Courthouse: Deborah Fisher & Paul Ramirez Jonas, Teresa Diehl, Shellyne Rodriguez, David Scanavino, Ellen Harvey, Lady K Fever and more

The exhibit continues through July 19, along with a variety of programs ranging from fashion shows to presentations by such Bronx-based artists as Eric Orr, Per One and Joe Conzo. The old Bronx Courthouse is located at 878 Brook Avenue at East 161 Street and Third Avenue in the South Bronx. 

Note: First photo features Deborah Fisher and Paul Ramirez Jonas, Something for Nothing, Mixed media, Custom designed neon sign

Research for this post by City-As-School student Diana Davidova; photos 1, 5, and 7 Diana Davidova; 2-4, 6 and 8 Lois Stavsky

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Boone Room Bronx graffiti Cope2 Celebrating the Launch of the Boone Room Website Tonight at Exit Room

Some of NYC’s most vibrant and striking murals–on Boone Avenue between 172nd and 173rd Streets in the Bronx–were demolished last year to be replaced by residential buildings. But thanks to the efforts of SLO Architecture, various artists, neighboring Fannie Lou Hamer High School, Maria Krajewski, City-As-School students and several others, the spirit of Boone Avenue lives. Featuring dozens of images, interviews and more, the Boone Room website, constructed by City-As-School students, can now be viewed online. To celebrate its launch, the public is invited to join the City-As-School family, several of the artists and a host of performers and musicians tonight at Exit Room.

 Artists interviewed for the Boone Room website include: Cope2, Eric Orr, Marthalecia and Valerie Larko who has preserved the walls in her amazing photorealistic paintings.

Screen Shot 2015 04 14 at 3.59.41 PM.png Celebrating the Launch of the Boone Room Website Tonight at Exit Room

Lady K Fever

Lady K Fever graffiti Bronx NYC Celebrating the Launch of the Boone Room Website Tonight at Exit Room

Kashink — who was visiting NYC from Paris — to the left of Lady K Fever

Kashink Lady K Fever Street Art graffiti Bronx NYC Celebrating the Launch of the Boone Room Website Tonight at Exit Room

 Tonight at 270 Meserole Street in Bushwick

Boone Room Launch Party Celebrating the Launch of the Boone Room Website Tonight at Exit Room

Post by City-As-School intern Zachariah Messaoud with Lois Stavsky; photos 3 and 4 courtesy Maria Krajewski

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Interspersed among some of the drabbest streets in the South Bronx Mott Haven-Port Morris neighborhood is an intriguing array of public art.  Here’s a a sampling:

 Wanda Raimundi-Ortiz, Wepa Woman

wepa woman street art Bronx NYC Mott Havens Motley Medley of Street Art: Wanda Raimundi Ortiz, Seth Mathurin, Dek 2DX, Dennesa Usher and more

Seth Mathurin, Bronx Bull

seth mathurin street art Bronx nyc Mott Havens Motley Medley of Street Art: Wanda Raimundi Ortiz, Seth Mathurin, Dek 2DX, Dennesa Usher and more

Dek 2DX

Dek2DX street art mott haven Bronx NYC Mott Havens Motley Medley of Street Art: Wanda Raimundi Ortiz, Seth Mathurin, Dek 2DX, Dennesa Usher and more

Unidentified artist has money falling from trees!

Money on trees mott haven the Bronx NYC Mott Havens Motley Medley of Street Art: Wanda Raimundi Ortiz, Seth Mathurin, Dek 2DX, Dennesa Usher and more

Dennesa Usher, Unlock Your Dreams, close-up

D.Usher street art mott Haven Bronx NYC Mott Havens Motley Medley of Street Art: Wanda Raimundi Ortiz, Seth Mathurin, Dek 2DX, Dennesa Usher and more

 Photos: 1-3 & 5 Lois Stavsky; 4 City-as-School intern Zachariah Messaoud

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The Bronx Graffiti Art Gallery1 The Bronx Graffiti Art Gallery to Open Tomorrow with Tats Cru, Ces, Kingbee, Lady K Fever, Scratch and more

The Bronx Graffiti Art Gallery, a new outdoor public art space located in the courtyard of Gustiamo at 1715 West Farms Road, officially opens tomorrow, Saturday, October 18, 1-5pm.  Committed to preserving and celebrating the culture of graffiti in NYC, its first exhibit features works by such Bronx legends as Ces, Kingbee, and Tats Cru, along with artwork by its curators, Lady K Fever and Scratch.

Here’s a sampling of what’s been going down:

Tats Cru‘s Bio, BG 183 and Nicer

bio bg183 nicer tatscru graffiti Bronx NYC The Bronx Graffiti Art Gallery to Open Tomorrow with Tats Cru, Ces, Kingbee, Lady K Fever, Scratch and more

Ces

ces graffiti Bronx NYC The Bronx Graffiti Art Gallery to Open Tomorrow with Tats Cru, Ces, Kingbee, Lady K Fever, Scratch and more

Kingbee

kingbee graffiti street art Bronx NYC The Bronx Graffiti Art Gallery to Open Tomorrow with Tats Cru, Ces, Kingbee, Lady K Fever, Scratch and more

Lady K Fever

lady k fever graffiti nyc The Bronx Graffiti Art Gallery to Open Tomorrow with Tats Cru, Ces, Kingbee, Lady K Fever, Scratch and more

BG 183 and Scratch

scratch bg183 graffiti street art Bronx NYC The Bronx Graffiti Art Gallery to Open Tomorrow with Tats Cru, Ces, Kingbee, Lady K Fever, Scratch and more

Hush Tours will provide free transportation from Manhattan to tomorrow’s event. For further information, contact Hush Tours at 212-714-3527.

All photos courtesy Scratch.

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Rappin Max Robot cover Eric Orr on Graffiti, Keith Haring, Hip Hop, the South Bronx, Comic Art, the New York Comic Con and more

Legendary for his collaborative artwork with Keith Haring on the NYC subways, Bronx-based artist and designer Eric Orr also produced the first-ever hip-hop comic book.  I recently had the opportunity to find out more about this multi-faceted artist who will be participating tomorrow – Friday – evening at the New York Comic Con panel discussion Hip-Hop and Comics: Cultures Combining, presented by Depth of Field.

You were one of the first graff artists to develop a distinct icon. Your “robot head” has since appeared on a wide range of surfaces – from T-shirts to record labels to international fine art exhibits. It has even made its way into Sotheby’s and Christie’s auction houses and catalogues. Can you tell us something about it?

It was inspired by the space age and the robotics era. I grew up in the age of Star Wars, Space Odyssey and the Robot Dance. And as tagging on walls and traditional graff didn’t do that much for me, my robot actually made it to the streets of the South Bronx where I grew up.

Orr meets Keith Haring NYC subway graffiti character Eric Orr on Graffiti, Keith Haring, Hip Hop, the South Bronx, Comic Art, the New York Comic Con and more

You may well be best-known for your collabs with Keith Haring that surfaced on the 6 Pelham Bay and the 4 and 5 NYC subways lines 30 years ago. You are, in fact, the only artist who ever collaborated with Keith in the subway system. How did you two first meet up?

Keith, it seems, had been eyeing my work for a while.  But we actually met, by chance, one day at a Swatch watch completion. I was wearing my hand-painted robot head shirt when Keith Haring approached me and invited me to collaborate with him on a series of artworks on the black panel spaces of the NYC subway system.

And these became a legendary part of NYC’s subway history! You also played a huge role in the hip-hop scene back in the day, producing work for Afrika Bambaataa and such hip-hop artists as Jazzy Jay, along with the brand logo for the Strong City Record label.  Can you tell us something about that? What exactly was the relationship between graffiti and hip-hop?  And was there one?

Yes! The same energy from the streets of the South Bronx that created the graffiti there in the late 70’s created hip-hop. Writers would go straight from getting up in the streets to hanging out at park jams and clubs. And it was largely the graffiti artists who designed the flyers for the hip-hop events.

Eric Orr hip hop character on comic Eric Orr on Graffiti, Keith Haring, Hip Hop, the South Bronx, Comic Art, the New York Comic Con and more

What about the relationship between hip-hop and comics? You produced the first-ever hip-hop comic and will be speaking about the two cultures at the  tomorrow – Friday.

From the beginning graffiti artists, MC’s and break-dancers adapted elements from the comic book culture. Just about everything — from our names to our fantastical identities to the flyers we designed — had comic elements in it. But only someone from the inside could have produced an authentic hip-hop comic.  My original “Maxwell Robot” strip ran in Rap Masters magazine.

Do you have a formal art education?

I studied art at the School of Visual Arts and the Art Students League.

Was it worthwhile?

Yes, it inspired me to take my work to a commercial level.

Cosmonaut Label Eric Orr on Graffiti, Keith Haring, Hip Hop, the South Bronx, Comic Art, the New York Comic Con and more

How do you feel about the interplay between graffiti/street art and the commercial world?

I have mixed feelings. It’s great for me and others to get paid to do the things we love. But it’s also easy for artists to be exploited — if their art is used to market a product and they are not getting paid for their artwork or sharing in the company’s profits.

You’ve done workshops with kids in New Zealand – to which you originally traveled to create a design for Serato — and recently here up in the Bronx. Can you tell us something about that?

Having grown up in the South Bronx, I understand just how important it is for kids to have positive experiences that nurture their creativity in productive ways. My most recent venture was with Sienide, working with youth to design a mural on 172nd Street and Southern Boulevard for the Children’s Aid Society’s.

erik Orr robot for childrens aid society Eric Orr on Graffiti, Keith Haring, Hip Hop, the South Bronx, Comic Art, the New York Comic Con and more

What’s ahead?

Cornell University recently approached me about purchasing the original source material for Rappin’ Max Robot for its hip-hop collection of rare books and manuscripts. I am currently working on an a piece for an upcoming train show at Grand Central, scheduled to open on November 22. And tomorrow evening, I will be participating in the New York Comic Con panel discussion Hip-Hop and Comics: Cultures Combining.

Congratulations! It all sounds great! 

Interview conducted and edited by Lois Stavsky; all images courtesy of Eric Orr; final photo by Lois Stavsky

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Under the curatorial direction of Tag Public Arts Project founder, SinXero, the walls on and off the 6 line in the South Central section of the Bronx have become one of the borough’s visual highlights.  Loved by both local residents and passersby, these murals, in fact, are now incorporated into an official tour of the Bronx. Here is a small sampling of what can be seen:

Marthalicia Matarrita and Raquel Echanique 

Raquel Echanique street art Bronx TAG Public Arts Project Adds Visual Intrigue to the Bronx with Marthalicia Matarrita, Raquel Echanique, Sexer, SinXero, See TF, Col, Werc, Daek William, Damien Mitchell, Chris Stain, Billy Mode and Zimad

Marthalicia Matarrita, close-up

Mathalicia Mattarita street art Bronx TAG Public Arts Project Adds Visual Intrigue to the Bronx with Marthalicia Matarrita, Raquel Echanique, Sexer, SinXero, See TF, Col, Werc, Daek William, Damien Mitchell, Chris Stain, Billy Mode and Zimad

Sexer

sexer graffiti Bronx NYC 2 TAG Public Arts Project Adds Visual Intrigue to the Bronx with Marthalicia Matarrita, Raquel Echanique, Sexer, SinXero, See TF, Col, Werc, Daek William, Damien Mitchell, Chris Stain, Billy Mode and Zimad

 SinXero

Sin Xero street art Bronx NYC TAG Public Arts Project Adds Visual Intrigue to the Bronx with Marthalicia Matarrita, Raquel Echanique, Sexer, SinXero, See TF, Col, Werc, Daek William, Damien Mitchell, Chris Stain, Billy Mode and Zimad

See TF

See TF street art Bronx NYC TAG Public Arts Project Adds Visual Intrigue to the Bronx with Marthalicia Matarrita, Raquel Echanique, Sexer, SinXero, See TF, Col, Werc, Daek William, Damien Mitchell, Chris Stain, Billy Mode and Zimad

Col Wallnuts

Col wallnuts street art graffiti Bronx TAG Public Arts Project Adds Visual Intrigue to the Bronx with Marthalicia Matarrita, Raquel Echanique, Sexer, SinXero, See TF, Col, Werc, Daek William, Damien Mitchell, Chris Stain, Billy Mode and Zimad

Werc

Werc street art Bronx NYC TAG Public Arts Project Adds Visual Intrigue to the Bronx with Marthalicia Matarrita, Raquel Echanique, Sexer, SinXero, See TF, Col, Werc, Daek William, Damien Mitchell, Chris Stain, Billy Mode and Zimad

Daek William – in from Australia 

Daek William street art Bronx NYC TAG Public Arts Project Adds Visual Intrigue to the Bronx with Marthalicia Matarrita, Raquel Echanique, Sexer, SinXero, See TF, Col, Werc, Daek William, Damien Mitchell, Chris Stain, Billy Mode and Zimad

Damien Mitchell

Damien Mitchell street art Bronx NYC TAG Public Arts Project Adds Visual Intrigue to the Bronx with Marthalicia Matarrita, Raquel Echanique, Sexer, SinXero, See TF, Col, Werc, Daek William, Damien Mitchell, Chris Stain, Billy Mode and Zimad

Billy Mode and Chris Stain

Billy Mode Chris Stain street art Bronx NYC TAG Public Arts Project Adds Visual Intrigue to the Bronx with Marthalicia Matarrita, Raquel Echanique, Sexer, SinXero, See TF, Col, Werc, Daek William, Damien Mitchell, Chris Stain, Billy Mode and Zimad

Zimad – close-up 

Zimad close up street art Bronx NYC TAG Public Arts Project Adds Visual Intrigue to the Bronx with Marthalicia Matarrita, Raquel Echanique, Sexer, SinXero, See TF, Col, Werc, Daek William, Damien Mitchell, Chris Stain, Billy Mode and Zimad

Keep posted to our Facebook page for many more Tag Public Arts Project images and check here for piece painted by the legendary John Matos aka Crash.

Photos by Lois Stavsky

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