Search: michaelcuomo

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Working with a motley range of discarded objects, Yonkers-based interdisciplinary artist Michael Cuomo repurposes them into masks that he calls Heads of State. Exhibited in both outdoor and indoor spaces, his unique sculpture assemblages provoke and entertain. This past week, some of his newest smaller masks made their way onto the Yonkers Waterfront.

Pigskin

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Rex

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Installation in Progress

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A master of neo-primitive folk art in all media, Michael Cuomo recently released a coloring book with his original soulfakes drawings. You can purchase it here.

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Photos by Richie DiFrisco

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As featured earlier this year in the New York Times, Nic 707’s Instafame Phantom Art movement continues to bring dozens of artists — from Old School writers to contemporary painters — back into NYC subway trains. Here are a few recently-captured images:

The legendary Skeme of Style Wars fame

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Gear One

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Nic 707

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Ivory

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The legendary Taki 183

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Michael Cuomo

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Kingbee — with fragment of Michael Cuomo on left

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Misha Tyutyunik

M-Dot-subway-art

Photos by Lois Stavsky

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We love the way discarded and found objects — or fragments of them – are transformed into public art.  Here’s a small sampling:

RAE BK in Manhattan

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Jim Power aka the Mosaic Man captured at work in the East Village

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Fragment from a pole fashioned by Jim Power

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Michael Cuomo in the Bronx

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Unidentified artist on the Lower East Side

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Photos: 1, 3-5 Lois Stavsky; 2 Dani Reyes Mozeson

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Huge fans of Michael Cuomo‘s street and subway interventions, we were delighted to visit his studio as he was getting ready for YOHO Artists Open Studio, in addition to a WallWorks NY pop-up show and a solo exhibit at Art Cafe in Brooklyn. Here’s a sampling of what we saw:

Lucky, fashioned from found objects

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Big Mouth, fashioned from found objects

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Self-Portrait

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The Tempest

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Untitled

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Note: Michael Cuomo’s studio is located at 578 Nepperhan Ave., Suite 505; Wall Works NY’s pop-up show — featuring a wondrous array of artists including Nick Walker, Tats Cru and Crash — opens tonight and continues through the weekend at 28 Wells Street, 2nd floor. And Michael’s solo exhibit at Art Cafe opens May 6 from 6-9 at 886 Pacific Street in Brooklyn.

YoHo

Photo credits: 1, 3-5 Lois Stavsky; 2. City-As-School intern Diana Davidova; YoHo Open Studio graphic designed by John Wujcik

You can check out a detailed schedule of what’s happening this weekend in Yonkers — including live painting by Crash, Fumero and Damien Mitchell — here.

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Nic 707‘s InstaFame Phantom Art continues to share a range of art — from tags by legendary writers to works by global artists — with NYC subway riders. Here are some images captured on a recent ride from East Tremont in the Bronx to Brighton Beach in Brooklyn.

Veteran UK graffiti writer, Pulse

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Bogota native Praxis

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The legendary TAKI 183

Taki 183

Praxis

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Nic 707

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Graffiti pioneer Skeme of Style Wars fame

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Mulit-media artist Michael Cuomo 

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Nic 707

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Michael Cuomo

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Photos by Lois Stavsky

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"Nic 707"

If you happen to be riding the NYC subways anywhere between the Brooklyn Bridge and Pelham Bay Parkway, you could be in for a treat – an impromptu art exhibit curated by veteran graffiti writer Nic 707Michael Cuomo, a multi-media artist based in Yonkers, accompanied Nic 707 on a recent ride to share some of his new paintings. Here’s a sampling from the InstaFame Phantom Art Project:

These women who exited the train on the Upper East Side were delighted by Nic 707’s InstaFame Phantom Art Project!

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Michael Cuomo, Wizard’s Well

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Michael Cuomo, Amazon Jungle

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Nic 707,  Kilroy Goes Wild

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Michael Cuomo, Astro-nuts

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Nic 707, Apocalypse Aftermath

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Nic 707, The Whole World in His Hands

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 Michael Cuomo, Bubblegum Ecstasy

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Photo of Kilroy Goes Wild by Eddie DiBono; all others by Lois Stavsky

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Michael Cuomo

Working with discarded objects he finds on the streets, Bronx-native Michael Cuomo has been busily creating an alternate universe.  Central to his cosmos are dozens of masks that he displays in a range of public spaces, engaging curious passersby of all ages.  We joined Michael this past Sunday up near Yankee Stadium.

You do magical things with what others have discarded.  When did it all begin?

The idea of working with found objects came to me after I took a three-hour class in “drawing with wire” at Bronx Community College back in 2006. I made my first masks with wire. And as I’d always been drawn to objects that others deem useless, I began to search for these objects and gradually incorporate them into my masks.

You certainly have some strange objects integrated into these masks – from car parts to broken toys to old hats. How do you manage to get hold of such a variety?

I find most of them on the streets, and recently friends and neighbors have begun giving me “donations.”

Michael Cuomo

When recycling these materials into masks, do you work with a defined concept of the final product?

Never.  It’s an organic process. When the mask is finished, it tells me so.  I have dozens of sketchbooks and constantly draw, but I don’t consciously work from my sketches.

What engages you about recycling and working with found objects?

It reminds me that we are all one on this planet.  The objects that I find help connect me with others – their original owners and our anscestors. I also feel that by recycling I am – in some small way – helping our planet.

Why have you decided to share your masks with the public out here on the streets?

It’s the best way for me to connect with the people. My art is “for the people” and “by the people.”  When strangers see my art and engage with it, they break the monotony of their daily lives. I also like the dialog that it spurs.

Michael Cuomo mask

Where have you displayed your masks?

I’ve shared them in quite a few public spaces. On 110th Street in East Harlem…in front of the Hayden Planetarium on the Upper West Side…on the 6 train.

What about galleries?

I’ve exhibited them at NYU, Gallery 69, at the Longwood Art Gallery up here in the Bronx, and I have a show coming up later this spring in New Rochelle.

How does your family feel about what you are doing?

They like it, but I can’t say they embrace it!

Michael Cuomo

What do you see as the role of the artist in society?

I see the artist’s role as a transformative one. Art enlightens. My art is an extension of the hip-hop movement that was born here in the Bronx. It is all about empowerment and change.

What’s ahead?

My artworks will continue to evolve and — eventually — will travel the world.

Photos by Lois Stavsky

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