Street Art NYC

Tucked into a narrow passageway off Rivington Street east of the Bowery is the ever-evolving Freeman’s Alley. Even as the street art scene becomes increasingly corporate and commercial, Freeman’s Alley continues to remain a treasure trove of unsanctioned artwork. While some works can last for months, many are quite ephemeral. Featured above is “No Child Is Illegal” by Lmnopi. The following images were captured during these past two months.

Sara Lynne Leo, “It Wasn’t Supposed to End This Way”

 Dylan Egon, “Saint America,” with Sara Erenthal to his left

The Postman does Robert Smith of the English rock band, The Cure (Be sure to look up for this one!)

UK-based Coloquix

City Kitty and friends

10-year-old Ethan Armen with Thomas Allen

Captain Eyeliner, Who’s Dirk and friends

Photo credits: 1, 2, 4-8 Ana Candelaria; 3 Lois Stavsky

{ 0 comments }

One of my favorite spots in town is East Harlem’s Guerrilla Gallery. Located on 116th Street, between second and third Avenues, it hosts some of the most authentic walls found anywhere. Always reflecting the spirit of the folks who either live in East Harlem or identify with its culture, the art that surfaces there is often political, provocative and celebratory. The aerosol portrait featured above was painted by Mexican artist Tomer Linaje.

This summer’s installation, produced by the Harlem Art Collective, is a salute to Harlem. Several images I captured of the current installation while exploring the neighborhood this past week follow:

Evelyn C Suarez, Rashida Stewart and more

Adam Bomb with Rafael Gama, bottom right

Rafael Gama, closer-up

Kristy McCarthy aka Dorothy Gale, Shani Evans, Rashida Stewart and more

Photos by Lois Stavsky

{ 0 comments }

The following guest poet is by Lower East Side-based photographer Ana Candelaria

It was love at first wheat paste. After several months of photographing Connecticut-born Sara Lynne Leo‘s work on NYC streets, I had the opportunity to meet her at COLLAGE NYC LIVE Art & Networking Event at the Delancey. More recently, I was able to find out a bit about her:

How old were you when you discovered your love for art?

I knew at four or five years that I love making art. My mother was an art teacher, and she always encouraged me.

Have you had any formal art training?

Yes, I studied at the School of the Museum of Fine Arts at Tufts University and at Emerson College. When I began studying art, I wanted to become a fine art oil painter in the style of the Italian classical masters. But  later on, I decided to move on to something more commercial that would, also, allow me to express myself on a personal level. I then studied animation.

Who are some of the artists who inspire you?

The British painter Francis Bacon. He’s super creepy and dark. I also like Kiki Smith‘s edginess.

Why did you decide to hit the streets?

I wanted to share ordinary stories that people could relate to. My character is an everyday person with everyday problems — who lives in the city.  It is a blend of illustrative style and cartoon.

How old is this character? When did you first create him?

My character is four to five months old.

Where can we find your character? I’ve seen it primarily on the Lower East Side and in Williamsburg.

My character has also made its way to the Bronx, but can be found mainly in Manhattan and Brooklyn.

I discovered some of your political work on your website. Why don’t we see more of your political work on the streets?

Good question! I ask myself the same exact thing. I guess it feels different to make a political statement vs. something more personal. I’m more inrerested in personal expression in public space at this point.

What kind of response have you received from the work you have shared on the streets?

Lots of positive responses.

How do you feel about the movement of street art to galleries?

I feel disillusioned that so many galleries ask us to “pay to play.” I don’t like when it’s so commercialized. It’s frustrating that it’s become so monetized.

What’s ahead?

I’d like to integrate animation into my character and bring him to life on the streets.

I would love to see that!

Interview and photos by Ana Candelaria

{ 0 comments }

This is the 14th in a series of occasional posts featuring the range of faces that have surfaced in NYC open spaces:

New Zealand-based Owen Dippie in collaboration with Al Diaz aka SAMO in Bushwick

Tel Aviv-based Solomon Souza

Huge segment of complete mural on the facade of the Brooklyn Commons on Marcus Garvey Boulevard

Brooklyn-based Ben Angotti in First Street Green Park for the Inspire Change Festival

Brooklyn-based Danielle Mastrion with Dorothy Gale, close-up from huge mural in First Street Green Park for the Inspire Change Festival

Photos by Lois Stavsky

{ 0 comments }

Hosted by Phillips Auction House on #GIVINGTUESDAY, November 27, Cool Culture presents an evening of food, open bar, dancing, raffles, along with sounds by DJ Paz and interactive art by Magda Love. And it’s all for a fabulous cause!

Each year Cool Culture partners with 90 cultural institutions — from museums to botanical gardens — and over 450 schools to provide free and unlimited arts access to 50,000 NYC families.

And in our current political climate, culture matters — perhaps, more now than ever. Next Tuesday evening’s #GIVEtoGET2018 is the ideal way to support a fabulous organization, while having a fabulous time!

Date: Tuesday, November 27, 2018

Time: 6:30 PM to 9:30 PM

Location: Phillips Auction House 450 Park Avenue (between 56 & 57th street)

Ticket: Purchase provides you with access to an open bar and appetizer

You can purchase tickets here. We are only 10 days away from #GIVEtoGET2018

All images courtesy Cool Culture; the third image was photographed at the Queens Museum by Margarita Corporan

{ 0 comments }

This is the 13th in a series of occasional posts featuring the range of faces that have surfaced in NYC open spaces:

Toofly at the Welling Court Mural Project in Astoria, Queens

toofly-street-art-welling-court

David Choe, close-up from his all-too-ephemeral mural on Bowery & Houston

david-cho-street-art-nyc

Cernesto at the Welling Court Mural Project in Astoria, Queens

cernesto-street-art-astoria-nyc

Tristan Eaton at Coney Art Walls

tristan-eaton-street-art-coney-island

See One in Long Island City for Arts Org

see-one-street-art-LIC_edited-1

Berlin-based Spanish artist Victor Landeta aka Aum in Bushwick

Victor-landeta-Bushwick collective_edited-1

 Photos by Lois Stavsky

Note: Hailed in a range of media from WideWalls to the Huffington Post to the New York Times, our Street Art NYC App is now available for Android devices here.

en-play-badge 2

{ 0 comments }

lamour-supreme-paints-100-gate-street-art-nyc

With Lamour Supreme’s completed shutter for the legendary Katz’s Deli, the 100 GATES Project has reached its goal of transforming 100 LES shutters into artworks. Produced by the Lower East Side Partnership, the project has been connecting artists with LES businesses through original murals on roll down security gates since the summer of 2014. Beginning today, September 15 through Sunday the 18th, the 100 GATES Project – in coordination with Tiger Beer –invites us to come out for a self-guided walking tour of the gates while enjoying Tiger Beer specials. Pictured above is Lamour Supreme captured at work by travel and street photographer Karin du Maire.

Another of Lamour Supreme, close-up

lamour-supreme-paints-les-nyc

Houston, corner of Ludlow

lamour-supreme-paints-100-gates-nyc

And a small sampling of what you will see on your self-guided walking tour:

ASVP, close-up, A. Feibusch Corporation, 27 Allen Street

asvp-close-up-100-gates

Hektad, T shirt-express, 15 Orchard Street

hektad-street-art-100-gates-street-art-nyc

For specific information, images and a wonderfully comprehensive documentation of it all, check out 100 GATES Project.

100-gates-image

Photo credits: 1-3, Karin du Maire; 4 & 5 Tara Murray

{ 0 comments }

nether-mural-art-tag-project-bronx-nyc

Founded and curated by SinXero, the TAG Public Arts Project — a A 501(c)3 Not for Profit in NY State — continues to bring a wonderfully diverse range of public artworks to the South Central section of the Bronx. Pictured above is a mural recently painted by Baltimore-based artist Nether 410. Here are a few others — fashioned by local, national and international artists — that I came upon this past Friday while exploring the streets on and off Westchester Avenue along the 6 line.

Brooklyn-based Australian artist Damien Mitchell, close-up 

damien-mitchell-mural-art-Bronx-nyc

Hong Kong-based Italian artist Barlo, close-up

barlo-street-art-mural-bronx-nyc

The legendary NYC-based Daze

daze-street-art-mural-bronx-nyc

With Brazilian artists TOZ & BR from the Flesh Beck Crew to his left, close-up

daze-and-fresh-beck-crew-graffiti-mural-art-Bronx-NYC

 NYC-based Sole Rebel

sole-rebel-mural-art-bronx-nyc

NYC-based Puerto Rican artist Ralph Serrano

serrano-mural-art-bronx -nyc

Rochester-based Mr. Prvrt and NYC-based A Visual Bliss, close-up

Mr-prvrt-visual-bliss-mural-art-bronx-nyc

 Photo credits: 1 Courtesy SinXero; 2-8 Lois Stavsky

{ 0 comments }

This is the 19th in an occasional series of posts featuring images of girls — and women — who grace NYC public spaces:

D*face in Manhattan

dface-street-art-soho-NYC

Pixel Pancho in Manhattan

pixel-pancho-street-art-chelsea-nyc

Commodore in Brooklyn

Commodore-stencil-art-Brooklyn-NYC

Faring Purth with Thievin’ Stephen in Brooklyn

thievin'-stephen--street-art-Brooklyn-NYC

JR in Manhattan

JR-LES -street-art-nyc

Photo credits: 1 & 3 Lois Stavsky; 2 & 4 Tara Murray and 5 Dani Reyes Mozeson

Hailed in a range of media from the Huffington Post to the New York Times, our Street Art NYC App is now available for Android devices here.

en-play-badge 2

Note: This blog will be on vacation through July 8. You can follow us on Facebook and on Instagram.

{ 1 comment }

This is the tenth in a series of occasional posts featuring images of children that have surfaced on NYC public spaces.

BK Foxx with JMZ Walls in Bushwick, Brooklyn

BK-Foxx-street-art-Brooklyn-nyc

Joe Iurato and Logan Hicks at the Bushwick Collective

Joe-iurato-and-logan-hicks-street-art-bushwick-collective-nyc

Ernest Zacharevic — based on photo by Martha Cooper — in Bed-Stuy, Brooklyn

EZ-street-art-bed-stuy-nyc

Swoon in Red Hook, Brooklyn

swoon-street-art-red-hook-nyc

Long-running Cekis in Clinton Hill, Brooklyn

cekis-street-art-clinton-hill-nyc

Rubin 415 and Joe Iurato with the Welling Court Mural Project in Astoria, Queens

rubin415-and-joe-iurato-street-art-Astoria-NYC-2016

Photos 1 Courtesy of John Woodward; 2-4 Tara Murray; 5 Dani Reyes Mozeson and 6 Lois Stavsky

Note: Hailed in a range of media from the Huffington Post to the New York Times, our Street Art NYC App is now available for Android devices here.

en-play-badge 2

{ 0 comments }