Graffiti

In this third post of our new series, PUSHING IT FORWARD — featuring ILLicit creatives claiming space on NYC streets — our focus now is on those images we’ve seen in the Bronx. Considered by many as the birthplace of graffiti back in the 70’s, the Bronx continues to host a multitude of unsanctioned markings. The character pictured above was fashioned by the itinerant Z-Bird. Several more photos of ILLicit public works recently captured in the Bronx follow:

FS TMR, RB OQB, BL WDD and DEN FTR

Jigl

Text and Cous

MFK

Reboe LNE

South LNE

Post and photos by the Pushing It Forward Collective

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In this second of our new series, PUSHING IT FORWARD — featuring ILLicit creatives claiming space on NYC streets — our focus now is on those images we’ve seen in Brooklyn. Pictured above is GTAR, MFK. Several more photos recently captured from the streets of New York City’s most populous borough follow:

Uwont and Ruinr

ZigZag and Wombat

Erup and Spray

Ethel and King Baby

Unidentified

Desa

Post and photos by the Pushing It Forward Collective

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Curated by COPE2, “Subway Art Legends,” a dynamic mix of artworks created by those icons who “rocked the trains” during the subway era of the early 80’s, continues through Tuesday at One Art Space in Tribeca. The tantalizing image featured above, China Red N.Y.C, was fashioned by the legendary Delta2 with acrylic, spray paint and paint markers. Several more infectiously rhythmic works on exhibit follow:

Bronx native TKid 170, “Old School,” Circa 1989, Redo of a classic

 Brooklyn native Dome, “NYC Subway Panel,” Enamel on metal

Bronx native Bom5, “Graffiti,”  36 x 24 in.

 Manhattan-native Part TDS, “Delta Blue,” Multimedia canvas, 12 x 16 in.

Bronx native and “Subway Art Legends” curator Cope2, “Salsa,”  36 x 36 in.

 London-native Wane One, “KNOWS,” 24 x 48 in.

Located at 23 Warren Street in Tribeca, One Art Space is open daily 1-6pm.

Photos of artworks, Lois Stavsky

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Yesterday afternoon, James Top Productions brought live painting, art vendors and a host of performances to Jackie Robinson Park in West Harlem. Despite the intermittent rain, the infectious positive energy was palatable from blocks away. Featured above is Queens-based writer and illustrator Topaz, standing alongside his iconic character.

Veteran graffiti artist and painter Wore One alongside his masterly-fashioned hip-hop character

Moving solo to the beats in front of King Bee’s iconic bee

The prolific, gifted New Jersey-based artist Will Power and his portrait of the late “King of Style” Case 2 aka Kase2

And just hanging–as the day wraps up: Vision, Will Power, Eric Orr and Jerry Maze

Photos: Lois Stavsky

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Queens is major stomping ground. It has been for generations – from the Long Island Railroad in Jamiaca. to Roosevelt Avenue in Jackson Heights. At the turn of the century, Queen’s 7-line train, rooftops, tunnels, and streets were notorious for their graffiti. From 74th street and Roosevelt Avenue all the way up to Flushing Main Street, graffiti was rampant. But then with elected officials like Mayor Rudy Giuliani and District Attorney Peter Vallone, it became scarce. These politicians, alongside prosecutors and judges, came down heavily on graffiti writers. Years went by with very little action on the 7 line. Then came the pandemic.

While most New Yorkers secluded themselves indoors during the early months of the pandemic, an impassioned minority ventured outdoors to make their mark on the city’s newly abandoned streets, storefronts and walls.  An entire new generation of ILLicit creatives with an irrepressible urge to “get up” was born. In an ongoing new series, Street Art NYC will highlight them, while also paying homage to veteran writers who are “pushing it forward.” This first in our series — spanning all five boroughs — focuses on the markings in Queens. The image above features Real. Several more photos recently captured in Queens follow:

Anso

Boni and Kitty

Pure

Angr and Tav

Faes and Sic

MTNW

Post and photos by the Pushing It Forward Collective

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During the first wave of the pandemic, several artists — largely working separately as they painted images onto plywood — joined forces to form the Soho Renaissance Factory. A diverse selection of these original works were salvaged and are on view through Tuesday, June 28 at ChaShaMa in Union Square. The exhibition, Beautiful Barriers: Street Art Beyond Walls, also features varied customized products including apparel, accessories, and skateboards in partnership with CocoRedoux. And joining the members of the Soho Renaissance Factory are guest artists EyeanticOPTIMONYCVanessa Kreytak, and 0H10M1ke.

The image pictured above was fashioned by the indigenous American multidisciplinary artist, Konstance Patton. Several more images captured while visiting the exhibition earlier this month follow:

Contemporary painter Brendan T. McNally

Brooklyn-based African American self-taught artist Amir Diop

Brooklyn-based muralist Manuel Alejandro aka The Creator

NYC-born, Jersey City-based Sule

 The legendary OPTIMONYC, guest artist

Hand-painted apparel, a small sample

A Closing Reception will be held on June 28, 6-9pm. You can register here:

Note:

June 26, 2022 3:00pm-4:00pm
Moderated by T.K Mills, Editor-in-chief of UP Magazine
Featured artists: OPTIMONYC, Vanessa Kreytak, Eyeantic, Calicho, and Ohio Mike

Photos: Lois Stavsky

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Launched in 2009, Welling Court Mural Project has transformed Welling Court and its surrounding blocks in Astoria, Queens into a welcoming, wondrous open-air gallery. Under the curatorial direction of Alison Wallis, a diverse range of artists are now busily bringing their talents and visions to Welling Court in preparation for this weekend’s festivities. When visiting on Monday evening, I came upon several artists at work and a few newly fashioned murals. Pictured above is artist, curator and arts educator Alice Mizrachi with spray can in hand. Several more images follow:

Style master Noah TFP at work

The renowned Greg Lamarche aka Sp.One

Thailand-based artist Headache Stencil

The legendary Lady Pink, close-up from her almost-completed mural

Another detail from Lady Pink’s hugely impressive and uplifting mural

Japanese artist Shiro brings new vibes to her old spot

These next few days will bring many more artists to Welling Court culminating this weekend in a two-day festival. Featuring live painting a  marketplace and more, it will take place June 25 and 26 from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. at 11-25 30th Avenue.

Photos: Lois Stavsky

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The Second Annual Troutman Rock has once again brought some of  NYC’s most intriguing writers together for a riveting first-rate production in Ridgewood, Queens. The image pictured above features the skills and visions of  FCEE, Nic1 and Curve. Several more murals follow:

French artist Seb Gorey, Homage, In Memory Of Kings

The legendary Greg Lamarche aka Sp.One

Queens-based style master Carlo Nieva aka Diego 127

The ever-ingenious Queens-based Chip Love aka Whisper

The amazingly skilled veteran graffiti writer Strider

Photos: Lois Stavsky

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When East Tremont resident Kay Love was offered the opportunity to paint a huge wall outside the nearby Colombian restaurant La Masa, she jumped at the opportunity. And what emerged was the first all- female artists’ production wall in the Bronx inspired by Colombia’s beauty — its divine indigenous women, history, culture and nature.

Among the talents featured in the mural segment pictured above are those of the legendary Japanese artist Shiro and self-described “Defender of the Bronx” artist Kay Love. Several more segments of the delightfully tantalizing mural follow — all fashioned by members of the  graffiti crew and collective  GW2 (Girls Write Too).

Colombia-born, East Harlem-based mixed media artist Gia, Secta 7 Collective member Neku, and graffiti writer & muralist Jai

Queens-based Asian American graffiti writer Ming and Shiro 

Stockholm-born, East Harlem-based graffiti writer and muralist Scratch

Bronx-based veteran graffiti writer Erotica

Special thanks to Scratch for sharing the backstory of the mural.

Photo credits:  1, 2 3 & 5 Lois Stavsky; 4 Kay Love

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In June 2018, Ohio’s Massillon Museum hosted “Moniker: Identity Lost & Found,” an exhibition featuring a distinctly remarkable documentation of mark-making and monikers, a grassroots movement which began in rail yards in the late nineteenth century. An exhibition catalog published at the time sold out almost immediately. This month heralds the release of a second edition in softcover format of Moniker: Identity Lost & Found in conjunction and cooperation with the Black Butte Center For Railroad Culture and its current exhibit, End Of The Line.

Published by Burn Barrel Press, the just-released Moniker: Identity Lost and Found features 148 full-color pages of rare archival documents, photographs, and artwork, along with a glossary of relevant terms. A fascinating foray into a distinctly American subculture of ephemeral artworks, it also offers a glimpse into many of these artists’ minds in their own voices. What follows is a sampling of images from the pages of this significant book as it brilliantly introduces us to an art form that is often overlooked by so many, including us graffiti and street art aficionados.

Who is This J.B. King? – from The Saturday Evening Post article by Jean Muir, May 1945 — referencing the prodigious “writer”  J. B. King, who was identified by his loopy scrawl

20,000th mark, 2002,  From the collection of  Smokin’ Joe

Writing implements, courtesy of Scot Phillips

Hoboe’s (sic) Directory, Nevada; 1910 Special Collections, University of Nevada, Reno Library, University Archives, (UNRS-P2017-07)

I Want to Be a Boss. Photograph by Sally and Jerry Romotsky, 1969. 35mm color transparency. Rail worker graffiti under the Fourth Street Bridge in Los Angeles. Courtesy Sally and Jerry Romotsky

Matokie Slaughter – Photo by Kurt Tors

You can order the paperback edition of  the hugely informative and entertaining Moniker: Identity Lost & Found here.

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