Shepard Fairey

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Committed to using art to transform the ways that teens are prosecuted and sentenced in New York’s adult criminal justice system, Young New Yorkers’ fifth annual Silent Art Auction will fund its grassroots arts program for teens facing criminal charges as adults. Curated by Layqa Nuna Yawar and Ann Lewis, the fundraiser features works by over 80 artists. On Wednesday, May 10th, the Annual Silent Auction will take place from 7-10pm at 548 W. 28th Street in Chelsea, Manhattan. Its special honoree is the wonderfully gifted, Brooklyn-based actor and activist Michael K. Williams.  Among the artworks to be auctioned are several with a distinct political consciousness. Featured above is Icy and Sot, Stop Police Brutality, Spray paint on wood. Here are several more socially-engaged artworks to be auctioned:

Guerrilla Girls, What’s The Difference Between A Prisoner Of War And A Homeless Person?, Offset lithograph

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Jordan Seiler, Collisions – Bullseye, Inkjet 

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Kara Walker, Lost Mountain at Sunrise: Harper’s Pictorial History of the Civil War (Annotated), Offset lithography and screenprint on Sommerset textured paper

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Distort, Estranged, Enamel and engraving on aluminum

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Nicholas Galanin,  The American Dream is Alie and Well, Archival Ultrachrome ink on Epson ultra smooth fine art paper

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And with the purchase of any artwork from Young New Yorkers, you will receive one of these Amplifier prints designed by Shepard Fairey 

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You can purchase tickers here for May 10th’s Silent Auction and bid on the artworks at Paddle8 here.

Images of artworks courtesy Young New Yorkers

Note: Hailed in a range of media from Wide Walls to the Huffington Post to the New York Times, our Street Art NYC App is now available for Android devices here.

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Back in 2014, the RAW Project transformed Wynwood’s Jose De Diego Middle School’s stark walls into a vibrant, sumptious outdoor gallery. During last month’s Art Basel, a team of artists — from across the globe — brought beauty and intrigue to the walls of Wynwood’s Eneida M. Hartner Elementary School. Pictured above is Jules Muck at work. Here are several more images captured on site by travel and street photographer Karin du Maire.

Mr. June at work

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Paolo Delfin

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Kevin Ledo — on left — with Shepard Fairey (w/assistants) and Paolo Delfin at work earlier on

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Case Maclaim at work

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RAW Project curator Robert Skran posing with Miami Dolphins’ Jarvis Landry aka Juice and Kai Aspire in front Kai’s and Jarvis’s collaborative artwork

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All photos by Karin du Maire

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Last month during Miami Art Week, the Bushwick Collective once again collaborated with the Mana Urban Arts Project in facilitating first-rate public artwork in Wynwood, Miami. Pictured above is a mural by Louis Masai, along with an installation by Davis McCarty. Here are several more works captured by street photographer Karin du Maire.

Netherlands-based Michel Velt

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West Coast-based Chor Boogie — in front of mural — and Miami’s Trek6

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Brazilian artist Sipros

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LA-based Shepard Fairey aka Obey Giant in front of one segment of his huge mural

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Chilean artist Fiorello Podesta aka Fio

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All photos by Karin du Maire

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To celebrate the launch of the new book from Wooster CollectiveELEVEN SPRING: A CELEBRATION OF STREET ART, artist ELBOW-TOE remembers the historic event and its impact on the world of street art.

I was talking to a younger artist the other day about street art that I was involved in as opposed to murals — which she considers street art — and she said, “Oh, you mean vandalism.”

How did we get here?

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I recall the moment that I knew I wanted to be a street artist – I was at work, and one afternoon, my friend pointed me to this post on a blog I had never heard of called Wooster Collective. It was an image by an artist who had photoshopped street signs, so that they looked transparent from the correct angle. It was absolutely magical. How did it get there? Who was the artist? I had seen some street art around over the years: WK Interact when I was in school in the early 90’s and around the early 2000’s quite a bit of NECKFACE around the corner from a print shop I was using.

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As I began to explore the archives of Wooster Collective, I saw that there was in fact a community that had built up around these random acts of art that I had paid little heed beyond the internal “huh, that’s interesting.” What was truly fascinating about the work was that, aside from a moniker, the work was anonymous. In that anonymity there existed a mystery. It elevated even the most banal work, purely by the act of risk that was involved. And for the first time in over a decade in the city, it pulled me out of my tunnel vision and got me looking at the walls as spaces to be activated.

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The Wooster Collective site was such an impeccably curated space that it got people outside of the movement to give it their attention. Having known the Schillers over those early years, I, of course, was head over heels when I was asked not only to be involved in their secret project but to be given a coveted space on the main floor. At the time I don’t think any of us realized that this exhibition would have the impact that it did.

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11 Spring was truly a transformative exhibition; it reflected the very transition that would occur wholeheartedly in this movement just by walking from the outside of the building to the inside. The exterior of the building still had the raw power of getting your work up. The work was often messy and might last only a few hours before being covered by a new piece. Contrast the organic energy of the ever-changing composition on the shell with an impeccably curated show inside the five floors of a gutted building, where all these artists were able to truly flex their technical and creative muscles without concern of the work being damaged or transformed by others.

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It was this mercurial quality of traveling from the outside to the inside and then back out again that gave this show such power in my opinion. I am not sure that there is a direct correlation of this show to the mural program that followed, but it certainly opened a larger audience up to the possibilities of their public spaces’ potential.

I will always cherish the experience.

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Note: With its outstanding documentation, along with an introduction by Shepard Fairey and an afterword by JR,  ELEVEN SPRING: A CELEBRATION OF STREET ART captures an important moment in the history of the movement. Tomorrow, Tuesday, November 29 — from 6:30 to 8:00 PM — Marc and Sara Schiller, along with FAILE, Lady Pink, Michael DeFeo, and WK Interact, will be at the Strand for a special signing and celebration of the book’s launch. You can buy tickets to the event here

Images 

1.  COVER, ELEVEN SPRING: A CELEBRATION OF STREET ART

2.  ELBOW-TOE  (BRIAN ADAM DOUGLAS), EVERYBODY’S GOT ONE, MADE WITH WOOD BURNER, YARN, AND PAINT. PHOTO ELBOW-TOE

3.  WK INTERACT, THE FIRST ARTIST INVITED INSIDE THE BUILDING. PHOTO JAKE DOBKIN 

4.  11 SPRING STREET, THE DAY OF THE OPENING. PHOTO JAKE DOBKIN 

5.  SHEPARD FAIREY, HARD AT WORK, MAKING IT LOOK EASY. PHOTO WOOSTER COLLECTIVE 

6.  BARNSTORMERS’ COLLABORATION WITH PAINTINGS BY Z¥$, DOZE GREEN AND KENJI HIRATA. PHOTO JAKE DOBKIN

7  JUDITH SUPINE AND DAVIDE ZUCCO (R3KAL), THERE IS HELL IN HELLO. PHOTO DONALD DIETZ 

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Coinciding with the Democratic National Convention, the non-profit Rock The Vote launched its Truth to Power campaign in Philadelphia earlier this week. Among its events was a three-day pop-up art exhibit featuring a varied range of socially and politically engaged works in different media. Among the artists who participated are many whose works have also surfaced in public spaces. Pictured above is Keith Haring with the City Kids Foundation. Here are several more:

Mear One, False Profits

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Beau Stanton, Elemental Crisis 

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Shepard Fairey aka Obey

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Lmnopi, Tehrir

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Mata Ruda, How Can I Write My Own Future with My Hands Bound?

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Photo credits: 1-3, 5 & 6 Lois Stavsky; 4 Sara Ching Mozeson

Note: Hailed in a range of media from the Huffington Post to the New York Times, our Street Art NYC App is now available for Android devices here.

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Showcasing a range of works by first-rate artists, Downtown Detroit’s Belt Alley is a wondrous open-air gallery. Here are a few more images I captured on my recent visit to the Belt, a collaborative venture between Bedrock Real Estate Services and the Library Street Collective.

Chicago-based Pose, close-up

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 Miami-based Douglas Hoekzema aka Hoxxoh, close-up

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UK-based Hush

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West Coast-based Shepard Fairey aka Obey

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Portuguese artist Alexandre Farto aka Vhils

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West Coast-based Dave Kinsey, close-up

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The Belt is located between the two wings of The Z parking garage on Grand River and Gratiot Avenues in Downtown Detroit’s former garment district.

Note: First image is by West Coast-based Tristan Eaton

Photos by Lois Stavsky

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Coinciding with On Our Hands, his solo exhibit of mixed media paintings opening tomorrow evening at Chelsea’s Jacob Lewis Gallery, Shepard Fairey is bringing his distinct aesthetic to two Mana Contemporary spaces in Jersey City.  The following photos were captured earlier this week by Audrey Connolly aka byte girl at the Mana Ice House, 581 Monmouth Street:

At work with spray can in hand

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On a brief, contemplative break

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And at work with his crew

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The mural in its final stages — representing Shepard Fairey’s aesthetic vision fusing Russian Constructivism, Chinese Communist propaganda and Americana

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All photos by bytegirl

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This is Part II in an ongoing series of posts featuring politically and socially conscious works that have surfaced on NYC streets:

Caleb Neelon and Katie Yamasaki collaborate on a memorial wall for Kalief Browder at Welling Court in Astoria, Queens

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East Harlem wheatpastes

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Shepard Fairey in Coney Island

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Kesley Montague leaves a message in Nolita

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Icy and Sot at Welling Court in Astoria, Queens

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Chris Stain and Josh MacPhee in the East Village, fragment from mural in First Street Green Park

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David Shillinglaw and Lily Mixe for Earth Day in Williamsburg, Brooklyn

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Photos: 1 & 2 Dani Reyes Mozeson; 3, 4, 6 & 7 Lois Stavsky and 5 Tara Murray

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Shepard Fairey

It’s been busy in DUMBO, Brooklyn. For the past week, some of our favorite artists have been gracing its walls with stylishly striking artwork, transforming its landscape into a stunning open-air gallery.

Shepard Fairey at work

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Faith47, close-up from completed mural

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Another Faith47 close-up

Faith 47

DALeast, close-up from completed mural

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Another close-up from DalEast’s mural

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Eltono at work

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Another close-up from Eltono mural in progress

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MOMO, close-up 

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Another close-up from MOMO mural in progress

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These murals are among eight to grace a four-block stretch along the BQE. We will continue documenting DUMBO Walls on our Facebook page.

Photos by Dani Mozeson

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For the past several years, the huge wall on Manhattan’s Bowery and Houston Street has served as a canvas for some of the globe’s most expressive street art.  Featuring the work of a diverse range of artists from the hugely talented Brazilian twins Os Gemeos to Brooklyn’s famed Faile duo, it entices and engages passersby daily. Here are a few highlights of the past two years:

Os Gemeos installation: summer, 2009:

Os Gemeos street art on the Bowery in New York

Shepard Fairey aka Obey installation, spring 2010:

Shepard Fairey street art on the Bowery in New York

Barry McGee aka Twist. mural, fall 2010:
 Barry McGee street art on the Bowery in New York
Faile, current mural, installed fall, 2011:

Faile street art mural on Bowery in New York

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