Fumero

Focusing on street art, graffiti and creative urban culture, UP is a provocative cutting-edge NYC-based quarterly magazine.  Launched in spring 2019, each issue spotlights a specific theme. Its first (sold-out) issue features several articles on money-related issues, and its second highlights matters of travel and place, as they relate to urban culture.

Lower East Side-based photographer Anna Candelaria introduced me to UP, and I was impressed by its in-depth coverage of the contemporary global urban art scene. Last week, Ana joined me as I met up with its chief editor, T.K. Mills.

Can you tell us a bit about UP Magazine‘s mission?

Our mission is to provide the art community with provocative writing that reflects the critical issues of our generation. We strive to present to our readers high-quality articles that investigate, inform, and entertain. Like good art, UP Magazine is made to make you think and make you feel.

What attracted you to urban culture? Particularly street art and graffiti?

After I had received my Masters Degree in Global Affairs from NYU, I wasn’t quite sure what direction my life would take. Shortly after Trump was elected President, I decided to visit Cuba. That’s where I first discovered my love for graffiti. I kept seeing 2+2=5. It seemed to be written everywhere. At first I couldn’t figure it out, and then I realized it was a reference to George Orwell’s 1984  — which certainly seemed relevant at the time. I even got to meet the artist. From that point on, I began paying close attention to the writing on the wall!

Before launching UP Magazine, had you any experience writing on this topic for other publications?

Yes, I wrote for several platforms including Sold Magazine, Open Letter and Art Fuse. I was also hired by a company, Saga, to interview West Coast-based street artists. When the company ended up not publishing my interviews after taking a different direction, a few of us began thinking about starting a new publication that would focus on urban culture.

How did you assemble such a dedicated and talented staff? 

Awhile back, I met Vittoria Benzine, a Brooklyn-based street art journalist and personal essayist, outside McNally Jackson Bookstore in Soho. As we began talking, we discovered our common interest in urban art. She then introduced me to Christina Elia, a freelance writer with a BA in Art History Communications. From there the crew grew to close to a dozen people, including street photographer Lonnie Richards, our Director of  Videography.

You have produced two excellent issues, each over 100 pages. What were some of your challenges in seeing this through?

The biggest and main challenge is finding sponsors and raising money to make this magazine happen.

Where is Up headed?

The only direction is up. We plan to further develop and expand our print and online presence. And we are looking forward to the launch of our third edition — with its focus on community — this spring.

That sounds great! I’m certainly looking forward to your next issue. And good luck with it all!

Note: Be sure to check out Up Magazine’s website and online shop. And with the promo code streetartnyc you can purchase issue II of Up Magazine at 25% off.

Interview conducted and edited for brevity by Lois Stavsky with Anna Candelaria

Images

1 Illustration of T.K. Mills by Vanessa Kreytak

2 Cover of Issue #1 featuring artwork by Fumero

3 Spread from Issue #2,”The Banksy Tunnel,” written by Candelaria Barandiaran with photos by Sabrina Ortolani

UP pop-up in Miami

5 Photo of T.K. Mills by Gabriel Ortiz, Jr

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This is the 14th in a series of occasional posts featuring the range of faces that have surfaced in NYC open spaces. The image featured above was painted by Fumero in Astoria, Queens for the Welling Court Mural Project, curated by Ad Hoc Art. Several more follow:

Danielle Mastrion  for Underhill Walls in Prospect Heights, curated by Jeff Beler

Nile Onyx for Underhill Walls in Prospect Heights, curated by Jeff Beler

Indie 184 on the Ridge Wall on the Lower East Side, curated by 212 Arts

Funqest for Underhill Walls in Prospect Heights, curated by Jeff Beler

Albertus Joseph for Underhill Walls in Prospect Heights, curated by Jeff Beler

Anthony Lister with the L.I.S.A Project NYC in Lower Manhattan

Photo credits: 1 Karin du Maire aka Street Art Nomad;  2 -7 Lois Stavsky

Note: Hailed in a range of media from WideWalls to the Huffington Post to the New York Times, our Street Art NYC App is now available for Android devices here.

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Ben-Angotti-Biggie

Continuing through tomorrow, Sunday, at the Bishop Gallery is 20 Big Years, an artistic tribute to the late Biggie Smalls. Presented by Spread Art NYC, it features works in a range of styles by over a dozen of our favorite local artists. Pictured above is a portrait of Biggie painted by Ben Angotti. Here are several more images from the exhibit:

Danielle De Jesus, Untitled

Danielle-dejesus-biggie

Danielle Mastrion, Crook from the Brook

danielle-mastrion-biggie

OGMillie, Biggie Smalls

OGMillie-king-of-NY

Fumero, Grafsfract Biggie

fumero-painting-Biggie

A particular highlight of the exhibit is the collaborative piece by Rocko and Zimer, who had painted the now-iconic Biggie tribute mural on Bedford and Quincy. You can check that one out out — along with over 20 other tribute pieces — through tomorrow at the Bishop Gallery, 916 Bedford Avenue in Bed-Stuy.

rocko and zimer-street-art-NYC

Photo credits: 1-5 from 20 Big Years, Tara Murray; 6 Lois Stavsky

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lady-pink-paints

Engaging a wide range of artists and art lovers of all ages, along with members of the local community, the Welling Court Mural Project celebrated its 7th anniversary with a huge block party on Saturday. Pictured above is the legendary Lady Pink at work. Here are several more images captured from the Welling Court Mural Project‘s annual event organized by Garrison & Alison Buxton.

Caleb Neelon at work on collaborative mural with Katie Yamasaki

caleb-neelon-street-art-wellling-court-mural-project-nyc

Fumero at work on tribute mural to Muhammed Ali

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Mike Makatron and Caroline Caldwell aka Dirt Workship at work on a collaborative mural

mike-makatron-with dirt-worship

Cre8tive YouTH*ink, close-up of huge mural painted by youth under the direction of  Jerry Otero aka Mista Oh

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Erasmo

erasmo-welling-court-mural-project-nyc

Chris Cardinale at work

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Joel Artista at work on collaborative mural with Chris Soria and Marc Evan

joel-artista-and-marc-evans-and-chris-soria-street-art-welling-court-mural-art

Pyramid Guy

pyramid-guy-welling-court-mural-project-nyc_edited-1

Joseph Meloy, Ellis G and Abe Lincoln, Jr

Meloy-ellis-G-andAbe-Lincoln, Jr

Photos by Tara Murray

Note: Hailed in a range of media from the Huffington Post to the New York Times, our Street Art NYC App is now available for Android devices here.

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el-nino-and-werc-street-art-brownsville-NYC

Conceived and facilitated by N Carlos J — noted artist, community revitalizer and founder of Brooklyn Is the Future — Writing on the Walls is a Brownsville-based mural arts initiative. Inspired to launch this project for his father, a Brownsville native who was diagnosed with cancer last year, N. Carlos’s Jay has engaged over a dozen artists in transforming his dad’s former stomping grounds into a vibrant outdoor canvas.

Another close-up from Werc and El Nino de las Pinturas

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Eelco, close-up

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BK Foxx based on photo by Bytegirl

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Lexi Bella

Lexi-Bella-streeet-art-mural-Brownsville-NYC

Fumero

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N Carlos J

n-carlos-j-brownsville

Note: This blog will be on vacation through mid-September. You can follow us on Instagram and on our Facebook page. Part II of Writing on the Walls to be featured on our return.

Photo credits: 1, 4 & 6 Tara Murray; 2, 3, 5 & 7 Lois Stavsky

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This is the ninth post in an occasional series featuring the diverse range of artwork on NYC shutters:

Claw Money

claw-money-shutter-les

Fumero

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Daze

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Iena Cruz

Cruz-street-art-williamsburg- NYC

Plasma Slug

Plasma-slugs-graffiti-shutter-Bushwick-NYC

Madsteez

Mark-Paul-Deren-Madsteez-street-art-nyc

Armas Carino

Armas-carino-street-art-nyc

Margot Bird

Margot-bird

JR

JR-Williamsburg-street-art

Photos: 1, 2, 4, 6, 7 & 9 Dani Reyes Mozeson; 3 Tara Murray; 5 & 8 Lois Stavsky

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Earlier this fall, the Dodworth Street Mural art project began a wondrous transformation of the area on and around Dodworth Street between Bushwick Avenue and Broadway. Here are just a few of the murals that have surfaced:

Eelco ’Virus’ Van den BergRocko and Vera Times

"Eelco and Rocko"

David Louf 

"David Louf aka June"

Miss Zukie and Lexi Bella

zukie-and-lexi- bella-dodworth-mural-street-art-nyc 2

Fumero

Fumero

Danielle Mastrion and CB23

"Danielle Mastrion and CB23"

Col Wallnuts, Marthalicia, BK, Damien Mitchell & Edob LOV3

col-mathalicia-BK-Damien-Mitchell-dodworth-mural-street-art-nyc

Photo credits: 1, 3 – 5 Lois Stavsky; 2 & 6 Dani Reyes Mozeson 

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In its mission to “make the JMZ lines more colorful – one wall, one gate, one space at a time,” JMZ Walls has brought not only color, but intrigue and charm, to Broadway and Myrtle and its immediate vicinity. Here is a  sampling:

Jay Shells

"Jay Shells"

@ducklings

ducklings-street-art-bushwick-nyc

Fumero

Fumero

Danielle Mastrion‘s homage to Michael Brown, the unarmed black teen shot dead in Ferguson, Missouri

"Danielle Mastrion"

Claw Money

"Claw Money"

BK Foxx

"BK Foxx"

Zukie

Zukie

Photo of Claw Money by Dani Reyes Mozeson; all others by Lois Stavsky

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With new murals outside and an array of artworks inside, Be Electric Studios on 1298 Willoughby Avenue is the site of a new exhibit featuring over 20 street muralists.  Here are a few images captured hours before it opened last night.

Chris & Veng RWK and Nicole Salgar & Chuck Berrett

robots-will-kill-nichole-salgar-chuck-berret-street-art-murals-NYC

Nicholai Khan at work, FumeroRaquel EchaniqueChris & Veng RWK and Nicole Salgar & Chuck Berrett

 "street Murals"

Magda Love at work

"Magda Love"

Sonni

Sonni

Joseph Meloy

"Joseph Meloy"

Cernesto

Cernesto

And Esteban del Valle adding some finishing touches to his indoor mural

Esteban-del-valle

Curated by Kevin Michael, the exhibit continues through Monday, 12 – 11pm.

Photos by Dani Reyes Mozeson

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Fumero

The rooftop of the 407 Bushwick, located at 407 Johnson Avenue, elevates the wonder and energy of street art. I recently had the chance to visit it and speak to its curator, Fumero.

You’ve transformed this rooftop into a vibrant canvas drenched with dazzling colors in an array of styles. How did this come about?

A friend of mine, dj and producer Onda Skillet, lives at the 407 Bushwick.  He was looking to bring some color to the rooftop that was covered mostly with old throw-ups. And I saw this as a great opportunity to bring the energy of the streets up to the roof.

Nicole-Salgar-and-Chuck-Berrett-and-Raquel-Echanique-at-the-407-Bushwick-street-art

You invited such a wonderfully diverse group of artists to paint here. Can you tell us something about how that came about?

In curating this rooftop, I chose artists whom I’ve met — and often worked with — throughout the years in different settings. I asked them to bring their distinct iconography with them. Some had never painted on walls before.

"Gumdrop and Whisbe"

You are consistently active on the streets. What is the appeal of the roof to you?  I remember catching glimpses of your pieces up here from street level and feeling frustrated that I couldn’t see more of them!

That’s part of the appeal. It incites interest. The roof is kind of a secret society. We are free to invite whom we want and no haters are allowed!

Cruz

Where would you rather paint – on the streets or on a rooftop?

I like them both.  They are different experiences. When I paint on the streets, I can engage people. But the roof has a distinct energy that I love.

"Craig Anthony Miller and Federico Cruz"

Your recent event Art in the Air, Music Underground, hosted by Aphotic, featured music, as well as art. Can you tell us something about that? How integral is music to what you are doing at the 407 Bushwick?

Its role is essential. The audio creations, performed by Onda Skillet with his Aerotropic label, were the perfect complement to the art. Opening rooftops to music and art is the next big thing! What’s happening here is a landmark. It is the future.

"JP O’Grodnick"

What about the location of the 407 Bushwick? Any thoughts about that?

The location couldn’t be more perfect. Bushwick is what the Lower East Side was 30 years ago. It’s the hub of cutting-edge art and music. The 407 Bushwick is the new CBGB.

Elle

What’s ahead?

More great energy, art and music! The second Art in the Air, Music Underground will take place this summer. The artists are already lined up, and we are now seeking sponsorship.

Fumero

It all sounds wonderful! What a great outdoor gallery NYC is!

Photos: 1. Fumero; 2. Nicole Salgar & Chuck Berrett with Raquel Echanique on right; 3. Gumshoe and Whisbe; 4. Cruz; 5. CAM and segment of Cruz; 6. John Paul O’Grodnick; 7. Elle, and 8. Fumero

Interview with Fumero and photos by Lois Stavsky; also featured on the roof of the 407 Bushwick are new works by Joseph Meloy, AOM, NS/CB, The Cupcake Guy, Rafal Pisarczyk and Robyn Henderson.

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