Claw Money

Brilliantly countering any claims that feminism is dead and that the Hip-Hop culture “is detrimental to women and girls,” Jessica Nydia Pabón-Colón has written an impeccably researched study of the grrls who have paved their way into the predominantly male graffiti culture, claiming their own space.

Based on interviews conducted with over 100 graffiti grrls across the globe over the span of 15 years, the author, now an Assistant Professor of Women’s Gender and Sexuality Studies at SUNY New Paltz, provides us with a window into the minds, practices and experiences of a wide range of female writers crossing cultures and generations.

Among the many assumptions and false claims female writers often have to contend with are that they are writing graffiti to get noticed by guys or doing it to make their boyfriends happy. Or that they aren’t writing at all; it’s their boyfriends who are doing it for them. Rumors, too, regarding their sexual promiscuity are rife.

And yet, for various reasons, many are reluctant to identify as “feminists,” a term too often associated with man-haters. Pabón-Colón relates how when she first asked the famed bomber, Miss 17, if she was a feminist, her immediate response was a brusque, “No.” Five years later – in 2009 – Miss 17  had tempered her views, largely due to the friendships that she had developed with the likes of Claw Money and the author, herself.

Throughout Graffiti Grrlz: Performing Feminism in the Hip Hop Diaspora, the author convincingly advances both feminism and graffiti as positive and vital social and political forces. Australian artist Ivey, for example, recounts the pride she feels on seeing her tag up and credits the graffiti culture with helping her get through difficult times and motivating her to pursue her education after graduating from high school.

Whether of not graffiti grrls identify themselves as feminists or perceive themselves as political, Pabon-Colon compellingly affirms that their “performances of feminist masculinity” merge the fundamental social, cultural and aesthetic aspects of Hip-Hop culture with the feminist movement

Published by New York University Press, Graffiti Grrlz is the first academic study on women’s participation within the graffiti subculture. Appended with examples of black book pages, comprehensive notes and an extensive bibliography. Pabón-Colón’s work is a rich tribute to the grrls whose voices are too often silenced and a gift to all of us who love graffiti, perhaps the most significant art movement of our time.

You can order the book directly from the author with a special discount here. And follow news of her readings and signings here.

Note: The third image features NYC native Abby and the final one features London-based Chock painting in the Bronx.

Images courtesy of the author; book review by Lois Stavsky

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Home to such projects as 100 Gates and Market Surplus, the streets and venues of Manhattan’s Lower East Side have introduced us to new talents, while showcasing some of NYC’s most prominent graffiti artists and muralists. Artists are now invited to submit ideas for an entire mural — or a segment of it — to be painted on the western façade of Essex Crossing‘s site at 145 Clinton Street that will be home to 107 market-rate apartments and 104 below-market-rate units. Check the Request for Proposals (RFP) for all the details and requirements. You have until December 15th to submit it.

The image featured above was painted by Gera Luz. Here are several more that have surfaced on the Lower East Side within the past year:

Hanksy

Flood

Buff Monster for Market Surplus

Claw Money

Lexi Bella

Photo credit:  QuallsBenson

Note: Hailed in a range of media from WideWalls to the Huffington Post to the New York Times, our Street Art NYC App is now available for Android devices here.

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Presented by New Design High School and Mass Appeal, Rooftop Legends continues to transform the rooftop of the former Seward Park High School into a first-rate open-air gallery. The mural featured above was painted by the legendary Claw Money. The following photos were captured at last Sunday’s celebration of urban art culture and community curated by New Design High School Dean Jesse Pais:

Greg Lamarche aka SP.ONE 

Queen Andrea at work

Cern

 Bluster One 

Pure TFP at work

Cekis at work

Photo credits: 1-4 Tara Murray; 5-7 Lenny Collado

Note: Hailed in a range of media from WideWalls to the Huffington Post to the New York Times, our Street Art NYC App is now available for Android devices here.

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Featuring dozens of national and local artists whose work is inspired by the political landscape, the Artists for Bernie Sanders national touring exhibit, The Art of a Political Revolution, continues through 7:00 PM this evening at 312 Bowery. While visiting yesterday, I had the opportunity to speak to its principal curator, Tyler Gibney of HVW8 Gallery.

bryan-blue-the-art-of-political-revolution

There is such a wonderful range of socially conscious art on exhibit here.  While some of the artworks directly reference Bernie Sanders, others touch on an array of social, political and economic issues. How did this all happen?

Bernie Sanders has always been a strong supporter of the arts. And soon after he appointed Luis Calderin — with whom I’ve worked in the past — as Director of Arts and Culture, Luis and I started working on launching this exhibit.

How were you able to engage such a diverse group of outstanding artists — many working in different media?

Both Luis and I had worked with many of the same artists when Obama was first running for President.  Several of these artists have also shown in my gallery. And in addition to the artists we both knew, many approached us — eager to participate.

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So many artists — of all ages — are supportive of Bernie. Why do you suppose this is so?

Bernie can be counted on to advocate for funding of the arts in our cities, schools and public spaces. He clearly understands the importance of the arts and has a proven record of supporting the arts. Artists can also easily relate to his values. Bernie takes no corporate donations.

And how might you explain his appeal to so many young people?

Many young people are feeling the need for a political revolution in this country. They graduate school with thousands of dollars in debt.  They witness a gross inequality of income. They see homeless people living on the streets in the richest country in the world. And with Bernie these issues come into the open.

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How did the opening of this exhibit here in NYC go?

It was amazing! We knew that Bernie’s wife and son would be here. But we didn’t quite expect him. He’d just been visiting the Vatican hours earlier! And so when he arrived, we were thrilled!

And are you satisfied with the response the exhibit is getting here in NYC!

Absolutely!

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The Art of A Political Revolution  —  produced by Bernie 2016, with support from HVW8 Gallery, Creative Cabal, The GoodLife! & Evolutionary Media Group — is open to the public today from 10:30am – 7pm.

Artist signings: Aaron Draplin from 11:00 AM – 1:00 PM; Jermaine Rogers from 1:00 – 3:00 PM and Claw Money from 3:00 – 5:00 PM

Photos by Lois Stavsky; interview conducted by Lois Stavsky with Houda Lazrak and edited by Lois Stavsky

Images

1. Greg Auerbach

2. Brian Blue

3. Claw Money

4. Rostarr  & Patrick Martinez

5. Dan Buller

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Connecting artists and businesses, the 100 Gates public art project continues to transform dozens of metal store shutters on the Lower East Side and in Chinatown into intriguing outdoor canvases.  What follows are just a few:

Mas Paz, X Cubicle, 25 Essex Street

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Damien Mitchell, Michele Olivieri, 118 Orchard Street

damien-mitchell-street-art-shutter

Billy the Artist, Michele Olivieri, 88 Delancey Street

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Ida Noelle, The Sill @ 84 Hester Street

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Abigail Kaage, Zest, 249 Broome Street

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Claw Money & Miss 17Red Mango, 145 Allen Street

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Faust and Shantell Martin, Lowline Lab/EDC Warehouse, 140 Essex Street

faust-and-Shantell=Martin-street-art-nyc

Jessica DeutchLucky Jack’s, 129 Orchard Street

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Buff MonsterBondy Export Corp, 40 Canal Street

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Founded by NYC artist and professional skater Billy Rohan, this public art project is managed by Natalie Raben, Director of Marketing and Communications at the Lower East Side Business Improvement District. If you own a business on the Lower East Side and would like to become involved with 100 Gates, check this out.

Photos: 1, 2, 5-9 Tara Murray; 3, 4 Lois Stavsky

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This is the ninth post in an occasional series featuring the diverse range of artwork on NYC shutters:

Claw Money

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Fumero

fumero-art-street-shutter

Daze

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Iena Cruz

Cruz-street-art-williamsburg- NYC

Plasma Slug

Plasma-slugs-graffiti-shutter-Bushwick-NYC

Madsteez

Mark-Paul-Deren-Madsteez-street-art-nyc

Armas Carino

Armas-carino-street-art-nyc

Margot Bird

Margot-bird

JR

JR-Williamsburg-street-art

Photos: 1, 2, 4, 6, 7 & 9 Dani Reyes Mozeson; 3 Tara Murray; 5 & 8 Lois Stavsky

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In its mission to “make the JMZ lines more colorful – one wall, one gate, one space at a time,” JMZ Walls has brought not only color, but intrigue and charm, to Broadway and Myrtle and its immediate vicinity. Here is a  sampling:

Jay Shells

"Jay Shells"

@ducklings

ducklings-street-art-bushwick-nyc

Fumero

Fumero

Danielle Mastrion‘s homage to Michael Brown, the unarmed black teen shot dead in Ferguson, Missouri

"Danielle Mastrion"

Claw Money

"Claw Money"

BK Foxx

"BK Foxx"

Zukie

Zukie

Photo of Claw Money by Dani Reyes Mozeson; all others by Lois Stavsky

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This is the seventh post in an occasional series featuring artwork on NYC shutters:

Elle at Welling Court in Astoria, Queens

Elle

Foxxface in Bushwick

Foxxface

Peruvian artist Biark in the Rockaways

Biark

Caratoes in the Bronx for the Tag Public Arts Project

caratoes

Claw Money and Lexi Bella at the Bushwick Collective

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Mark Paul Deren aka MADSTEEZ on the Lower East Side

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UR New York in Bushwick

"UR New York"

Queen Andrea in the East Village for the LISA Project

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Photos: 1, 4 & 5 Lois Stavsky; 2, 6-8 Dani Reyes Mozeson and 3 by Tara Murray

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This is the fifth in a series of occasional posts featuring the range of curious characters that have found a home on NYC streets:

Buff Monster in Little Italy

"Buff Monster"

Federico Massa aka Cruz in Bushwick

Cruz

Nepo in Bushwick

Nepo

Nemo — in from Italy — in Williamsburg

Nemo

Pose in SoHo

Pose

stikman in SoHo

Stikman

Unidentified artist in Brooklyn

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Claw Money in Midtown Manhattan

"Claw Money"

Photo of Pose by Lois Stavsky; all others by Dani Reyes Mozeson

 

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In partnership with the New Museum’s Ideas City Festival, Centre-fuge’s Cycle 8, Influx in Flux, expanded to include additional containers on East 1st Street, along with wide panels inside the First Street Green Park. Here are a few images captured this past week:

Italian artist Federico Massa aka Cruz at work

Cruz

Brooklyn-based Elle at work

Elle

Brooklyn native Mor at work

Mor

Brooklyn-based ND’A

ND'A

Simply signed “Exit”

Exit

Veteran graffiti master Demer at work

Demer

The legendary Claw Money at work

Claw Money

NYC-based painter and musician Yuri Velez at work

Yuri Velez

Noted painter and sculptor Ray Smith

Ray Smith

Puerto Rican native Sofia Maldonado at work 

Sofia Maldonado

The young, talented members of Cre8tive YouTH*ink at work 

Cre8tive YouTH*ink

Recently cited in TimeOut New York as one of NYC’s Top Spots for Street Art, the Centre-fuge Public Art Project, under the curatorial vision of Pebbles Russell and Jonathan Neville, is committed to transforming transitional spaces and construction sites in New York City into public works of art. To assist the Centre-fuge Public Art Project with funds needed to continue and expand their project, check out its Indiegogo campaign.

Keep posted to our Facebook page for additional images of artwork by Sheryo, The Yok, Cram Concepts and more.

Photos by Lenny Collado, Dani Mozeson, Tara Murray & Lois Stavsky

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