Alice Mizrachi

From September 15 – 18, an all-female team of urban artists — local, national and global — brought their skills and visions to 49 Wyckoff Avenue in Bushwick, Brooklyn.

The stunning image featured above was fashioned collaboratively by project curator Herakut (pictured) and Miami-based Didi Contreras. Several select images — all captured by by travel and street photographer Karin du Maire aka Street Art Nomad — follow:

Brooklyn-based Lexi Bella, who assisted the project’s curation (top), and local, mixed-media artist Isabelle Ewing

New York-based interdisciplinary artist and educator Alice Mizrachi

The legendary Ecuadorian-American graffiti artist and muralist Lady Pink

London-based Spanish artist Lours

NYC-based graphic designer and muralist Queen Andrea

Brooklyn-based muralist and painter Danielle Mastrion

Bristol, UK-based artist HazardOne

Special thanks to Karin du Maire aka Street Art Nomad for documenting this project and sharing it with us

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Launched in 2009, Welling Court Mural Project has transformed Welling Court and its surrounding blocks in Astoria, Queens into a welcoming, wondrous open-air gallery. Under the curatorial direction of Alison Wallis, a diverse range of artists are now busily bringing their talents and visions to Welling Court in preparation for this weekend’s festivities. When visiting on Monday evening, I came upon several artists at work and a few newly fashioned murals. Pictured above is artist, curator and arts educator Alice Mizrachi with spray can in hand. Several more images follow:

Style master Noah TFP at work

The renowned Greg Lamarche aka Sp.One

Thailand-based artist Headache Stencil

The legendary Lady Pink, close-up from her almost-completed mural

Another detail from Lady Pink’s hugely impressive and uplifting mural

Japanese artist Shiro brings new vibes to her old spot

These next few days will bring many more artists to Welling Court culminating this weekend in a two-day festival. Featuring live painting a  marketplace and more, it will take place June 25 and 26 from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. at 11-25 30th Avenue.

Photos: Lois Stavsky

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Showcasing an eclectic range of artworks by 60 emerging and established urban artists, the third 60 Collective Art Exhibition is a cause for celebration. Established back in 2013 by Frankie Velez and Craig Anthony Miller, the 60 Collective continues its tradition of supporting the arts and public education, as a percentage of proceeds from its sales will be donated to the local Dock Street Middle School’s art and after-school enrichment programs. For this third installment, the curators have teamed up with Executive Producer Josiane Lysius in presenting to the public a first-rate representation of contemporary urban culture.

The image featured above, “Back in the Days,” was fashioned on canvas by the always-passionate and prolific Will Power. Several more images of artworks on exhibit follow:

Bronx-based world’s first ‘Hip-Hop Comic Book’ creator and sole Keith Haring subway drawing collaborator Eric Orr, Untitled, 2019, Mixed media on wood

Japanese multimedia artist and nurse Shiro, “Heart Beat,” 2022, Spraypaint, acrylic and marker

Multimedia artist and arts educator Alice Mizrachi, “A Dream Realized,” 2022, Mixed media collage on wood

Dumbo-based artist and 60 Collective co-curator Craig Anthony Miller aka CAM, “The Pursuit of Nectar,” 2022, Mixed media on wood panel with resin

NYC-based multimedia artist LeCrue Eyebrows, “And on,” 2022. Acrylic on canvas

The prolific Staten Island-based artist Chris RWK, “Once, twice, three times forever,” 2022, Mixed media on canvas

And taking place tomorrow, Sunday, May 29, between 4-6pm at the exhibition space on 30 Washington Street is a 60 Collective curators’ talk featuring Craig Anthony Miller aka CAM and Frankie Velez.

Other future events include:

Artist Talk: Cey Adams and Eric Adams, Thursday, June 2, 6-8pm

A Poetry Tribute to the 60 Collective: Curated by Tai Allen, June 7, 6-10pm

Grand Closing Reception: Friday, June 10, 6-10pm

Photos of images 1-7: Lois Stavsky

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The image featured above was painted by the wonderfully talented Santa Fe native Miles Toland. Several more images of females on walls that I captured on my recent visit to Miami follow:

New York-based Alice Mizrachi, close-up

Miami-based Daniel Fila aka Krave

Puerto Rican artist Alexis Diaz

LA-based Audrey Kawasaki, a recent addition to Wynwood Walls

Photos by Lois Stavsky

Note: Hailed in a range of media from WideWalls to the Huffington Post to the New York Times, our Street Art NYC App is now available for Android devices here.

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Curated by Alice Mizrachi, Fem-is-in is an homage to the female spirit in this time of female-led activism.  Featuring a diverse range of work by female artists who have forged their distinct paths, Fem-is-in engages and entices.  The artwork pictured above is by the legendary Lady Pink. What follows is a small sampling of works that can be seen at Fat Free Art through next Saturday.

Alice Mizrachi

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Queen Andrea

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Jane Dickson

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Swoon, close-up

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Also featured in Fem-is-in are works by: Lady Aiko, Diane McClure, Ann Lewis aka Gilf!, Janette Beckman and Martha Cooper.

Located at 102 Allen Street on Manhattan’s Lower East Side,  Fat Free Art is open Tuesday-Saturday 11AM-7PM and Sunday 12PM-5PM.

Photos of images: 1, 4 & 5 Lois Stavsky; 2 & 3 Tara Murray

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We recently had the opportunity to speak with writer and photographer Yoav Litvin about 2Create, his ongoing project and upcoming book on creative collaborations.

We love your recently launched 2Create Facebook Page and Group. Can you tell us something about the concept behind 2Create? What is its mission?

The aim of 2Create is to study and promote teamwork and fellowship as it showcases the art of collaboration. Folks tend to place far more emphasis on competition than on collaboration. But so much more can be accomplished if we work together.

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Yes! We tend to glorify individualism, particularly in the West.

And my point is that when two people create, it is greater than two. 1 + 1 is not 2, but something more. The duo is the basic unit of a collective.  And we need to look at forming collectives as a means to solve our societal problems.

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One of your initial projects, related to this larger one, is your upcoming book, 2Create: Art Collaborations in New York City.  Can you tell us something about it?

Yes. It will be released by Schiffer Publishing this fall. It showcases the works and processes of nine pairs of NYC graffiti and street artists. Each duo consists of two artists whose unique styles came together to create a larger-than-life work of street art in a NYC neighborhood. The book focuses on the backgrounds, techniques, and collaborative processes of the featured duos.

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What spurred you to produce this particular book? What was your impetus behind it – in addition to promoting the concept of collaboration?

There were a number of factors. I was interested in expanding the documentation that I began in Outdoor Gallery New York City by getting to know more of my favorite artists – like Cekis and Rubin. But most of all, it was a project that enabled me to further develop myself as an artist by integrating my background in psychology, my passion for progressive politics and my respect and love for graffiti and street art in NYC.

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What were some of the challenges that you faced in the process?

Identifying artists who could work well together and produce first-rate artwork was the initial challenge. I also had to gain their confidence and access to their relationship so that they would speak freely about the process.  And some of the artists were quite shy – which was an additional challenge. And, then, for some of the works I had to secure walls, materials and more.

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What’s ahead for 2Create?  Where are you going with it?

I want to continue documenting and interviewing duos that work together in a wide range of scenarios: visual arts, dance, music and more!

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How can we become engaged with your project? Can we contribute to it?

You can Like the project on Facebook and share your own collabs and connect with others here. You can also follow it on Instagram and on Twitter.

It sounds great! And what a wonderful concept!

Images

1. Dasic Fernandez with Rubin 415

2. Icy and Sot

3. Cekis with Cern

4. ASVP

5. Jilly Ballistic with Al Diaz

6. Alice Mizrachi with Trap IF

7. Logo design by Dan Michman

Photos © Yoav LitvinYoav in conversation with Lois StavskyTara Murray and City-as-School intern Sol Raxlen

Note: Hailed in a range of media from the Huffington Post to the New York Times, our Street Art NYC App is now available for Android devices here.

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This is the tenth in an occasional series of posts featuring the range of faces in different media that have surfaced in NYC public spaces:

New Zealand-based Owen Dippie in Bushwick, Brooklyn

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UK-based multimedia artist Ryan Gander on the High Line

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Alice Mizrachi, captured at work this past June in the East Village

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How & Nosm and Tristan Eaton in Williamsburg, Brooklyn

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German artist Hendrik Beikirch aka ECB in Bushwick, Brooklyn

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Bogota-based Australian artist Crisp in Brooklyn

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Chris Soria and Joel Bergner aka Joel Artista in Bushwick, Brooklyn

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Hong Kong-based Caratoes in Bushwick, Brooklyn

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Photo credits: 1, 4 & 5 Lois Stavsky; 2 & 8 Dani Reyes Mozeson; 3, 6 & 7 Tara Murray

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On view at the Judith Charles Gallery though tomorrow — Sunday — is a selection of new works, along with salvaged ones, by many of the artists who had participated in last year’s landmark 21st Precinct Exhibit. Here is a sampling:

Alice Mizrachi

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Ghost and Giz, fragment salvaged from last year’s installation

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Chris Soria and Misha Tyutyunik

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Pesu 

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Lorenzo Masnah. fragment

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Ben Angotti. close-up

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Bad Pedestrian

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N Carlos J

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Presented by Outlaw Arts, the exhibit remains on view 1-9pm today, Saturday, and tomorrow.

Photos of artworks by Lois Stavsky 

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This is the 14th in an occasional series of posts featuring images of girls — and women — who grace our public spaces:

Dasic in Bushwick

"Dasic Fernandez"

Ben Angotti in Bushwick

"Ben Angotti"

Mexican artist Fusca and French artist Kazy in Bedford-Stuyvesant

"Fusca Kazy"

Swoon in Red Hook

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Ree2 and Teck1 in Washington Heights

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Alice Mizrachi in the Rockaways

"Alice Mizrachi"

Photos: 1, 2 & 4 by Dani Reyes Mozeson; 3 & 5 by Lois Stavsky and 6 by Tara Murray

Note: StreetArtNYC will be on vacation through December 1. Follow what’s happening here in NYC on our Facebook page.

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Opening this evening from 6-9pm at the Hi-Arts Gallery on 304 East 100th Street is JR’s Inside Out Mi Gente/ Oyáte kiŋ Art Project — focusing on and uniting two communities: NYC’s East Harlem and South Dakota’s Pine Ridge Reservation. Here are a few images captured yesterday while visiting the exhibit, curated by Carlos Mare:

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Closer-up

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And more

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And outside with murals by Alice Mizrachi and Part One

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 Photos by Dani Reyes Mozeson

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