Conceived in 2014, the RAW Project has been bringing color, intrigue and inspiration to schools in Miami and beyond at a time when American schools continue to see their programs defunded. During the week of Art Basel 2019, a group of local, national and international artists painted murals at the Enedia W Hartner Elementary School and the Jose de Diego Middle School. The mural featured above was fashioned by the Netherlands-based duo  Telmo Miel. Several more images — all captured by travel and street photographer Karin du Maire aka Street Art Nomad — follow:

Frankfurt-based Case Maclaim

  Montreal-based Kevin Ledo

UK-based Dale Grimshaw

LA-based Eric Skotnes

Miami native Amanda Valdes

London-based Fin DAC

Photos by Karin du Maire aka Street Art Nomad 

Note: Hailed in a range of media from WideWalls to the Huffington Post to the New York Times, our Street Art NYC App is now available for Android devices here.

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Always a treasure trove of first-rate graffiti, North Philly’s 5th Street and Cecil B Moore, along with its immediate surroundings, has expanded since my last visit. There are now additional walls — curated by Tameartz —  in the new performance and event venue, Sunflower Philly. Featured above is the work of Philly-based Saoka DRR with Imse DBR to his right. What follows are several more murals that I came upon last week in the general location:

BustaImse, Desilmula, Michael Pistash and Tameartz 

Seoz

Rams

Medic

Alex25 and Veer

Easy B2B

Photos by Lois Stavsky

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During the UN Climate Change Conference COP 25 held earlier this month in Madrid, Spain, NYC-based Greenpoint Innovations teamed up with Barcelona-based, Cuban-American artist Jorge Rodriguez-Gerada.

Two new street art murals, fashioned by the hugely talented artist for the first international activation of Greenpoint Innovations‘ art plus purpose series, now grace Madrid’s visual landscape as they bring awareness to the impact of climate change.

Pictured above is Jorge Rodriguez-Gerada‘s completed mural, Past, Present, Future, featuring a portrait of Hilda Pérez, a leader of the Indigenous Ashaninka Community and Vice President of ONAMIAP, the    National Organization of Andean and Amazonian Indigenous Women of Peru.  Several more images of the two murals, captured by photographer Fer Alcalá, follow:

Past, Present, Future — in progress

Jorge Rodriguez-Gerada at work on Forest Focus — an eye of Planet Earth with the Amazon rainforest as the pupil and Chile clearly visible as a homage to the official COP 25 host country. The mural shines a light on the opportunity to address natural forest loss as a pathway to climate stability, habitat conservation, and ecosystems preservation.

Forest Focus, the completed mural

Greenpoint Innovations founder and curator Stephen Donofrio with Jorge Rodriguez-Gerada

The wall host for the murals is the Occupational Center in Lineal City ( Centro Ocupacional Ciudad Lineal), a center for people with intellectual disabilities.  Aligned with the goals of GreenPoint EARTH, this facility is dedicated to helping people develop professional, personal and social skills.

The project was completed with support from local and global organizations — including the City and Community of Madrid, UNFCCC, National Wildlife Federation International, Arbor Day Foundation and Forest Trends.

Photos: Fer Alcalá 

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The following guest poet is by Lower East Side-based photographer Ana Candelaria:

Curated by Fernando “Ski” Romero, Here & Now honors the works of Bronx graffiti legends Tats Cru a.k.a The Mural Kings and the legendary John “Crash” Matos “for laying the groundwork for so many other aspiring artists and helping establish Graffiti for the true art form that it is.” Also featured alongside Tats Cru and Crash are the works of Daze, Nick WalkerEric Orr and curator Ski. The exhibition continues through January 12 at Pop International, 195 Bowery at Spring Street.

The image feature above, Dreams Don’t Die, was fashioned by Bio Tats Cru with spray paint, markers and ink on canvas. Several more images follow:

Nicer Tats Cru, The Mattress, Acrylic and spray paint on canvas

BG 183 Tats Cru, The Night That Never Sleeps, Mixed media on canvas

Crash, Silver Color Swatch, Spray paint on canvas

Daze, The Dark Night, Oil, acrylic, spray paint on canvas

Nick Walker, RGB Supreme, Mixed media on canvas

Eric Orr, Painting, Mixed media on canvas

Fernando “Ski “Romero, Break Up, Mixed media on canvas

Gallery hours are: Monday through Saturday 10:00am to 7:00pm; Sunday 11:00am to 6:00pm or by appointment 212.533.4262.

Photos of artworks:  2-4, 7 & 8 Ana Candelaria; 1, 5 & 6 Lois Stavsky

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Founded and curated by Miami-based Registered Artist, the Third Annual aWall Mural Projects took place in South Miami from December 1-8 bringing a diversely rich range of artworks to the Jorge Mas Canosa Middle School. Featured above is Richmond-based Wingchow. Several more images captured by travel and street photographer Karin du Maire aka Street Art Nomad follow:

San Diego-based Michelle Ruby aka Mrbbaby

 Massachusetts native Tom Bob

North Carolina-based Dustin Spagnola

 Malaysian artist Kenji Chai and to his right Texas-based Tarbox

Guatemala-born, Texas-based W3R3ON3 

Founded in 2017, the non-profit aWall Mural Projects is “built on the idea that through service, art becomes a catalyst for social change.” Its special emphasis is on transforming schools through large scale art including murals and installations.

Photos:Karin du Maire aka Street Art Nomad

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Featured yesterday morning on NY1, Of Women, By Women, a group exhibition on view through this Sunday, December 22, presents original artwork by 18 contemporary women artists who have also made their presence on our streets. While visiting the exhibit this past Sunday at the Storefront Project on the Lower East Side, we had the opportunity to pose a few questions to its curator, Wendy Horwitz aka Love From NYC.

The word is that this is your first curatorial experience. How did this exhibition come about? 

I never planned on curating an exhibit. This wasn’t my idea. A male friend, in fact, suggested last summer that it would be a good idea to present an all-women street art show. He said, “If anyone could do it, you could do it!” And I decided to do it.

What was the greatest challenge you faced in seeing this through?

Finding a venue. And then when I heard that the owner of the Storefront Project is a woman, Gina Pagano, I approached her.

Yes! This space is ideal. How did you decide which artists to include?

I researched as many female street artists as I could. I was interested in featuring artists with a strong local presence who could work together cohesively.

How have folks responded to the exhibition?

They’ve been really enthusiastic. I’ve received very positive feedback from visitors, as well as the artists themselves. They were very excited to come together and meet one another.

What’s ahead?

I’m not sure. This has been a “passion project.” I don’t know if I will curate another show, but people are encouraging me to do a series of shows featuring women artists.

Congratulations on this! We do look forward to more! And how wonderful to be featured on NY1!

Note: A panel discussion will be held tomorrow, Thursday, December 19, from 7-8pm. Moderated by Vittoria Benzine of UP Magazine, it will feature Butterflymush, Lexi Bella and LOVEMKM. Located at 70 Orchard Street, the Storefront Project is open today through Sunday, 1-7pm and and tomorrow, Thursday, until 8pm.

Photos:

1 LMNOPI

2 Isabelle Ewing with Wendy Horwitz aka Love From NYC to her left

3 Swoon

4 Surface of Beauty

5 Dee Dee 

6 Alice Mizrachi

Also featured in Of Women, By Women are: Butterflymush, Chinon Maria, Jilly Ballistic, La Femme Cheri, Lexi BellaLOVEMKM., Magda Love, My Life in Yellow, Nora Breen, Sara Erenthal, Shiro and Toofly.

Interview conducted by Lois Stavsky and edited by Lois with Ana Candelaria

Photo credits: 1, 2, 3, 5 & 6 Ana Candelaria; 4 Lois Stavsky

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The following guest poet is by Lower East Side-based photographer Ana Candelaria:

Born in Rochester, New York and currently based in Queens, City Kitty makes his presence wherever he happens to be. And each piece that he creates is distinctly intriguing. 

When did you first discover your love for art?

I’ve always loved art, and it’s always been a part of my life. I come from a very artistic family. My grandparents were both painters. They met when they were students at Pratt. My mother was a singer. I, myself, was a musician for many years, and my brother is a musician. It’s just something that has always been encouraged.

Do you have a formal art education?

Yes. My undergraduate degree is in Art Education from Nazareth College in Rochester. I worked as a substitute teacher for a bit, but I did not end up pursuing teaching as a career. I then went back to school and earned an MFA in Painting from the University of Albany, where I taught undergraduate courses in drawing for two years. I have an entirely different career in the Fine Arts. That work looks nothing like my street art.

On the streets we identify you with your City Kitty character. When was your City Kitty character born? And how did you come up with its design?

I moved to NYC in January 2010. And two months later, I met a couple of friends who were working at the Fountain Art Fair. They ran a collective that I ended up joining, and I started meeting more and more street artists. I used to do graffiti as a kid, and I saw that if I were to do street art, I’d have to make up a character.

So I thought, “All right I’ll come up with a character!” I grew up in a house with five cats. And when I lived in Bushwick, there were two gangs of cats on either side of the adjacent factory, and they were always having kittens.

Do you remember your first City Kitty piece?

Yes, the first thing I did was make a silkscreen. The style of work that I do now is similar to what I did back when I was in a band. When I moved down here, I was still making band posters. But since hanging posters here is illegal, I decided that if I’m going to get into trouble, it might as well be for my own work! That’s when I started burning silk screens. I would make all of my work by hand for the posters, but then I would print them out. I would make one cut paper piece, scan it and print multiple copies and put them out. All the other poster artists that I knew and fell in love with were silkscreen artists, so if I’m going to change gears, I’m going to want to start with silkscreen.

Who are some of your favorite artists?

There are poster artists and fine artists. Jeff Soto is kind of a crossover, as are Michael Motorcycle and Tara McPhearson. Jeff is a great painter, but he also does murals. Tara designs toys that she shows at Comic Con and she’s, also, represented by galleries. I like that balance. I do a lot of posters between working on fine art paintings.

I have seen some of your sketches on MTA service announcement posters on the New York City subway platforms.

Yes! I usually grab the posters on my way to work. I’ll draw them on my lunch break, and I’ll put them up on the way back home. And they get around — as I work in different parts of the city from the Lower East Side to Harlem. And when I have to get to New Jersey, I travel through Midtown.

When did you start putting up these MTA service announcement sketches? And why?

About a year and a half ago, I put up 113 of them. Sometimes they’re up for a few days, and other times they stay up for as long as a month. After 10 years of doing street art, I felt like I was making work for the same audience. On the subways I can reach a different audience and, perhaps, make some people smile. And I don’t sign my subway sketches. I like that feeling. And since I’ve begun doing this, I’ve only been yelled at by a couple of transit workers.

Have you ever done a wall?

Yes, I have done several. My first wall was in Ithaca at a bar where I used to play with my old band.

What about collaborations? I’ve seen your collaboration with Turtle Caps. Do any others stand out?

I‘ve collaborated with a lot of people. For years, I did a lot of work together with my street art friend Bludog. I also collaborated with Grey Egg from New Jersey, and I worked with some people from Europe.

What gives you the biggest thrill in this street art scene?

Traveling to new cities and putting my work up in them — especially since it’s such a worldwide thing. It’s a global community. I love seeing what other people are doing and I love contributing to it.

Are you generally satisfied with your work?

I’m satisfied when I finish, and then a few days later, I hate it!

How has it evolved over the years?

I use more colors and my characters have evolved over time.

Running into your pieces always makes me feel happy! And I’m looking forward to seeing more of them…especially on my way to work! What’s ahead?

I’m now working on the wall at Second Avenue and Houston. A solo exhibition of my hand-embellished MTA posters will open this Friday evening from 6-10 pm and continue through Saturday, 12-8 PM, at the Living Gallery Outpost, 246 East 4th Street.

Collaborations:

3. City Kitty with London-based  Neon Savage

5. City Kitty with Queens-based Turtle Caps

6. City Kitty with Toronto-based Urban Ninja

Interview conducted by Ana Candelaria and edited by Lois Stavsky

Photo credits: 1 Lois Stavsky 2-7 Ana Candelaria

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Curated by Museum of Graffiti co-founder Alan Ket, the museum’s exterior and the immediate environs host over a dozen murals in a range of graffiti styles. The exquisitely-crafted mural featured above was fashioned collaboratively by: Hiero Veiga, Bacon and Quake. Several more of these recent murals, captured by travel and street photographer Karin du Maire aka Street Art Nomad this past week, follow:

UK-based Lovepusher in his inimitable 3D style

Eurotrash at work, and to his left — Miami-native James Monk aka Rasterms 

Miami’s Sinse at work with Amsterdam-based calligraffiti master Niels Meulman a.k.a. Shoe‘s “Museum of Graffiti” signage looming in the background

NYC-based graff masters Ces, Yes2, Doves and Mast

Miami native Abstrk with Lima-based Entes

Photos: Karin du Maire aka Street Art Nomad 

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Opening this week in Wynwood, Miami is the Museum of Graffiti, the world’s first museum dedicated solely to graffiti art.  Fostering an understanding of the work of the pioneering graffiti artists, who started tagging in the New York subways in the early 1970s, the museum’s permanent exhibition, under the curatorial direction of Alan Ket, features paintings, photographs, mixed media sculptures, assorted memorabilia and interactive installations “that will allow visitors to travel through time and learn about the evolution of the worldwide graffiti art movement.”

Featured above is veteran all-city writer Charles Henry aka Flip One, captured back in the day by graffiti writer and photographer Flint Gennari.  Several more photos, taken by travel and street photographer Karin du Maire aka Street Art Nomad while previewing the Museum of Graffiti last week, follow:

Museum co-founder and lead curator Alan Ket

Vintage spray paint cans 

NYC-based writers Ghost aka Cousin Frank and Giz

Graffiti pioneers Mare139, Blade, Ero, Sonic Bad and Lady Pink

Masters Mare139Doze Green, Defer and JonOne

Defer , closer up

And the branding of the art form

Also featured at the Museum of Graffiti’s inaugural exhibition is a special exhibit showcasing works by Amsterdam-based calligraffiti master Niels Meulman a.k.a. Shoe. Open daily, except for Tuesday, from 11am to 7pm, the Museum of Graffiti is located in the heart of Wynwood at 299 NW 25th Street, Miami. And in addition to what is housed and takes place indoors, the exterior boasts a range of rotating murals by first-rate graffiti artists.

Photos: Karin du Maire aka Street Art Nomad 

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Earlier this fall, ST.ART founder Kamilla Sun traveled to Kathmandu, the capital and largest city of Nepal. On a voluntary mission — with money raised through a crowdfunding campaign to procure art supplies — Kamilla taught young Napoli students how to transform their school’s drab, dingy walls into vibrant, colorful ones.  

The “Start With A Dream” project, explains Kamilla Sun, “aims to teach the little builders of the future how to imagine, dream bigger and create.”  The vast majority of Nepal students live in poverty and have had little exposure to the arts.

Renowned NYC-based artists Jason Naylor, Sonni Adrian and Adam Lucas created simple mock-up mural designs that the students easily recreated for their school’s walls under Kamilla’s guidance. Other artists who contributed to the project include Agata Wojcierowska and Natasha May Platt aka Surface of Beauty.

Pictured above are the student participants in front of their collaborative mural, “Dream,” as designed by Jason Naylor, and — below that  — the mural as painted on NYC’s Lower East Side by Jason Naylor and Surface of Beauty.  Several more images — all created by the young Nepali students — follow:

Designed by Sonni Adrian and painted collaboratively by Nepali students

Young artists pictured with ST.ART founder Kamilla Sun

Designed by Adam Lucas and painted collaboratively by Nepali students

Completed mural

Designed by Agata Wojcierowska and painted collaboratively by Nepali students

Completed mural

And you can watch Kamilla talk further about the project and view the youngsters in action here:

All images courtesy ST.ART founder Kamilla Sun

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