ND’A

nda-mural-art-market-surplus-nyc

This past weekend, the now-abandoned Essex Street Market at 140 Essex was the site of Market Surplus, an exhibit featuring ten huge striking murals in a range of styles — from meticulously rendered photorealistic to brightly colored expressionistic. Largely site-specific, they were the perfect homage to a soon-to-be-demolished historic Lower East Side building.  While visiting late Sunday afternoon, I had the opportunity to pose a few questions to its curator, Adam Lucas aka Hanksy.

hanksy-mural-art-market-surplus

This is quite impressive. When did you begin working on it?

It all started a week and a half ago.

That’s quite remarkable. It must have been quite an intense week and a half! What moved you to curate it? 

Essex Crossing has been committed from early on to bringing public art projects to this neighborhood. Awhile back, they tapped me to help them accomplish this. When they offered me this building as a site for this exhibit, I took the opportunity to curate Market Surplus.

sonni-

It seems like so much effort for a weekend event. It’s wonderful, but I wish it weren’t over so quickly!

Large murals like these generally have long lives.  But I actually like the twist on permanence. Bringing these kinds of murals indoors for this transitory exhibit turns the notion of permanence on its head.

How did you decide which artists to engage?

I reached out to artists I know and like — who were in town. And some of the artists recommended other artists.

faust-market-surplus-calligraphy

There are quite a few references to the neighborhood in these works.

Yes. Among them is NDA‘s painting of Luis and his son Felix of the Luis Meat Market that is housed at the Essex Street Market.  A key mission of the exhibit was capturing the spirit of the Lower East Side.

I love the variety of styles and sensibilities featured here. Each is distinctly wonderful!

My intention was to present a range of styles. That was one of my criteria in selecting artists.

bk-foxx-surplus-market-mural-art-nyc

With Market Surplus behind you and now part of the history of the Lower East Side, what is next?

In two weeks, my work will be featured in a pop-up show at the Krause Gallery here on the Lower East Side. Later in the summer I will be painting a mural for the L.I.S.A Project. And there is much more to come!

It sounds great! And congratulations on this weekend’s exhibit.

Images

1. NDA

2. Adam Lucas aka Hanksy

3. Sonni

4. Faust

5. BK Foxx

Photo credits: 1, 2, 3 & 5 Lois Stavsky; 4 Karin du Maire; interview conducted and edited by Lois Stavsky

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NDA-Iena-Cruz-paint-Henley-SoHo-NYC

We stopped by the Henley Vaporium earlier this week to watch two of our favorite artists — NDA and Iena Cruz — as they were collaboratively painting a huge wall in the splendid backyard garden at 23 Cleveland Place. We also had the opportunity to speak to Kimyon Huggins, the curator of the newly launched Secret Garden Series.

Kimyon-Huggins -NDA-Cruz- HenleyVape

This looks fabulous! Just what is the Secret Garden Series?

Beginning this month and continuing through late fall, several leading street artists and muralists will spend one week each month collaboratively painting the back wall of the garden at 23 Cleveland Place.  During that week, visitors to the Henley Vaporium will be able to watch the artists in action. And at the end of the week, a reception will be held to unveil the final work and to celebrate the artists.

NDA-paints-street-art-mural-HenleyVape-NYC

Your first public reception takes place this Saturday, May 16. What can visitors expect?  

They can expect, of course, to meet and socialize with the artists and view the completed murals. They can also expect music by such DJs as DJ Jaclyn, KC and the Real Christiano?, along with food and drink. And they will find themselves among a great community of artists, art lovers, patrons and tourists from throughout the globe.

Cruz-paints-Henley-SoHo-NYC

How did you discover this particular venue? It is lovely.

The owners are friends and I like their anti-establishment vibe. The Henley Vaporium is part retail store, part education center and part social hub. Featuring a huge lounge, performance space and outdoor garden, it is ideal. Each month smaller works of art by each of the artists will be displayed inside the Henley Vaporium. Along with limited edition photographs of the completed murals, they will be made available for purchase online, with 10% of the proceeds going to public arts advocate StreetArtNYC and vape industry advocate SFATA (Smoke-Free Alternatives Trade Association).

NDA-Cruz-street-art-mural-the-Henley-NYC

Which artists can we expect to see in the months ahead?

Other artists already lined up include GILF and Ivan Orama in June and Elle and Vexta in July.

It sounds great! We are looking forward to it all.

Note: The Henley Vaporium is located between Spring and Kenmare Streets and is easily accessible by public transportation.

Secret-garden-series

Interview and photos 2, 4 and 5 by Lois Stavsky; photos 1 and 3 by City-as-School intern Diana Davidova

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Art-Is-Trash

Featuring a diverse range of artists – many active in the streets – the Future Is Now continues through the 20th at 60 Orchard Street on Manhattan’s Lower East Side. While visiting the exhibit soon after it had opened, I had the chance to speak to Kimyon Huggins, who along with Kennedy Yanko, curated it.

Joseph-conrad-ferm-art-60-Orchard Street

ross-broder-art-60-Orchard

This show is wildly eclectic – featuring a broad range of visions and styles. Can you tell us something about this exhibit’s title? Its mission? What does it all mean?

The Future Is Now references a new form of Dadaism, where artworks of varied styles from artists of different backgrounds come together in a cohesive fashion.

Jamie-Martinez- aka-Triangulism

Is there any common theme to these dozens of artworks?

It’s all an ode to the 80’s – to punk rock and its DIY sensibility.

Iena-Cruz-art-60-Orchard

How did you choose these particular artists? There is quite a range here, with many active on the streets.

They are all people that Kennedy Yanko and I know – urban artists whose artworks represent the theme of the exhibit.

kimyon-huggins-art-60-orchard

And what about this space, 60 Orchard?

It couldn’t be more perfect. A space like this on the Lower East Side is where “the future is now.”

NDA-art-at-60-Orchard

The Future Is Now remains on view through January 20 at 60 Orchard Street between Hester and Grand on the Lower East Side.

Photos

1. Francisco de Paja aka Art is Trash

2. Joseph Conrad-Ferm

3. Ross Brodar

4. Jamie Martinez

5. Iena Cruz

6. Kimyon Huggins

7. NDA

Photos 1, 4 and 5 by Tara Murray; 2, 3, 6 & 7 by Lois Stavsky

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The following guest post is by Yoav Litvin, a writer, photographer and author of the recently released Outdoor Gallery – New York City book on contemporary NYC graffiti/street art.

Newmerica

Ñewmerica is a collective of artists, which includes LNY, Icy and Sot, Mata Ruda, NDA and Sonni. Each well-known to street art enthusiasts in New York City and worldwide, they joined forces in “The Birth of a Nation,” currently on display at Exit Room in Bushwick. After a fantastic opening chocked full of performances, raffles and other fun surprises, I returned to Exit Room to re-examine the art.  The first piece one encounters is an installation piece constructed by the group —  “La Inmortal Deli,” a bodega stocked with hand-embellished bottles and cigarette boxes. Outside the bodega are pieces by each of the artists in the main hall of Exit Room.

Newmerica

It is very refreshing, Ñewmerica, to see a group of talented artists — each in their own right — form a collective. What are you trying to achieve with Ñewmerica?

Ñewmerica is a friendship and a platform for independence. When artists start out, they are free to create a body of work as they see fit, but then as the gallery system takes over, the work gets dissected and profiled to fit curatorial restraints or group show themes that tell their own stories. This can take away from an artist’s ability to present and represent his or her work. Ñewmerica is a collective push to take that complete artistic expression back by making the work we want to see exactly the way we want to see it. Ñewmerica is freedom.

Newmerica

Is there a collective experience for foreign artists trying to make it in NYC? Can you tell us something about the name, Ñewmerica?

None of us are native to NYC – our shared playground. NYC is the perfect stage for anybody to talk about anything resembling national identity, immigrant identity, or issues of gentrification and generational perspectives. Our individual work speaks about these issues already, and it gets amplified when we work together. At the same time this is just our reality. Even if we don’t make identity an issue we see it coming up in every day life. Analyzing identity is a way of discussing the reality of New York.

Bodega-foreclosure-at-Exir-Room

What’s wrong with America and what are you trying to change?

We are not necessarily trying to change anything, but just better ourselves through collaboration, sharing, and friendship. That’s the only way we can create a better commons and consequently better communities, neighborhoods, cities and nations. Know thyself before you wreck thyself and thy town.

"NDA and Icy & Sot"

The bodega – why did you choose a bodega as the collaborative point for the collective, and not some other nexus? Why did you choose to make art on alcohol bottles and cigarettes boxes?

The bodega is a contested battleground. Much like the subway, it unifies a city because all social strata melt into it. Commerce and necessity make the bodega a contemporary secular place of worship where we all get our alcohol, coffee, cigarettes and purchase dreams on lottery tickets. It is this quintessential NYC icon — that has played an important role forming our culture — that is slowly getting lost. The bodega icon has been the focus of a lot of scrutiny, a specific example for this is the Street Market installation by Barry McGee, Todd James and Stephen Powers at Deitch Projects back in 2000 — something we all looked at and talked about at the beginning of this production and in a way are paraphrasing as part of this longer dialogue in time.

"Mata Ruda and Icy and Sot"

Is there significance to the name, “La Inmortal Deli?”

“La Inmortal Deli” is our nod to this history and our wish for this type of questioning to continue while simultaneously dealing with contemporary issues. Contrary to its name, “La Inmortal Deli” has an expiration date; it has been foreclosed and will soon be replaced by a Bank of America. So where will our culture go? What will replace the bodega in this new city we are building? What can we do about it?

Newmerica

Please tell us some of Ñewmerica‘s plans for the future.

Ñewmerica has lots of fun and secret events planned for the future months – check back with us to find out @nwmrca and on our Facebook page.

"Sonni and LNY"

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 “The Ñewmerican Dream is our biggest success to date,” commented Exit Room founder Dariel MTZ and co-founder Daniela Croci aka Zoe. “This group of artists represents the perfect balance between a grittier street art style and fine art, highlighting diversity in style, ethnic influences and a critical, yet progressive, new vision for American society.”

“The Birth of a Nation” continues through April 19 at 270 Meserole Street.  Gallery hours are Wednesday – Sunday: 5 – 8pm

All photos by Yoav Litvin; photos 1-4. Bodega installation; 5. NDA and Icy & Sot; 6. Mata Ruda and Icy & Sot; 7. Ñewmerica — all members, and 8. LNY and Sonni

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Dozens of new artworks, representing a wide range of cultures, styles and approaches, have surfaced this summer at 5Pointz. Here are a few from NYC’s ever-evolving open-air gallery:

Veteran graff artists Bis and Vor 

Bis and Vor

London-based artist Christiaan Nagel installs his iconic mushroom with a little help from Meres

Christiaan Nagel

 Austrian artist Roofie

Roofie

Japanese artist Shiro with PartYes1 and Meres

Shiro, Part, Yes One and Meres

ND’A and Bishop

NDA and Bishop

The Mexican Har crew, close-up

Har graffiti

Har Crew, complete mural

Har Crew

French artist Zeso

Zeso

Brooklyn-based international muralist Joel Bergner

Joel Bergner

Barcelona-based artist Dase

Dase

Photos by Dani Mozeson, Tara Murray and Lois Stavsky

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This is the fourth in an ongoing series featuring the range of faces that surface daily in NYC’s open spaces:

Alice Mizrachi aka AM at the Bushwick Collective

Alice Mizrachi

How and Nosm, close-up in the South Bronx

How and Nosm

ND’A in Williamsburg, Brooklyn

NDA

Cern and Lee Quiñones in Fort Greene, Brooklyn

Cern and Lee Quinones

Carlos Pinto in Flatbush, Brooklyn

Carlos Pinto

Paul Richard in the East Village — on the pavement

Paul Richard

ECB on the Lower East Side

ECB

Photos by Dani Mozeson, Tara Murray and Lois Stavsky

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This is the third in an ongoing series featuring the range of faces that surface daily on NYC’s public spaces:

Pose and Revok on the Bowery and Houston, close-up

Pose and Revok

Argentinian artist Ever on Williamsburg rooftop, close-up

Ever

Australian artist Vexta at Welling Court in Astoria, Queens

Vexta

Cern on truck spotted on Manhattan’s Upper West Side

Cern

Mata Ruda and ND’A at Welling Court in Astoria, Queens

mata ruda and ND'A

Crystal Clarity on Lower East Side rooftop

Crystal Clarity

Danielle Mastrion with signature by El Niño de las Pinturas at 5Pointz in Long Island City, Queens

Danielle Mastrion

 Phetus in Bushwick, Brooklyn

Phetus

Photos by Lenny Collado, Dani Mozeson, Tara Murray & Lois Stavsky

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While not conducting his post-doctoral research on Brain and Behavior at The Rockefeller University, Jerusalem native Yoav Litvin can be found on our city streets pursuing his passion for street art. We recently met up for a chat.

Dain

What spurred your interest in public art?

As a result of an injury, there wasn’t much I could do other than walk around.  So that’s what I did. And once I began to notice street art, I couldn’t stop taking photos of it. I also appreciate the risks artists take when putting up pieces; it’s a rush I can relate to. And I admire the artists’ generosity in taking these risks to share their vision with the public.

Alice Mizrachi and Cope2

What is it about street art that continues to so engage you?

I love its beauty and humor. I appreciate its aesthetic and the way it challenges convention. It is a beautiful, non-violent way to raise issues in the public sphere.  And as a political person, I am drawn to the confrontational nature of much of it.

Never Satisfied

What do you see as the role of the photographer in today’s street art movement?

Because of the transient nature of public art, I see it as essential. The image is important, but so is its context and appropriate accreditation to the artist.  And documentation of NYC’s street art trends is especially essential as this city is the world’s cultural Mecca.

gilf!

Tell us a bit about your current project.

I’ve been working for over a year now on a book that profiles 46 of the most prolific urban artists working in NYC.  It will feature images and interviews, along with some exciting supplements.

Jilly Ballistic

Have you any favorite artists whose works you’ve seen here in NYC?

There are too many to list. I love them all for different reasons.

Enzo and Nio

How do you keep up with the current scene?

In addition to documenting what I see and speaking to artists, I follow popular street art blogs such as StreetArtNYC, Brooklyn Street Art and Vandalog.  I also check Instagram daily for new images that surface not only on NYC streets, but across the globe. And I try to attend gallery openings as often as possible.

NDA and Elle Deadsex

We certainly look forward to reading your book.  Tell us more about its current progress. How close it is to publication?

I’ve finally completed the stage of collecting texts and images, and am currently working together with a first-rate designer. I am now seeking a publisher.

Yoav can be contacted at yoavlitvin@gmail.com

Featured photos are in the following sequence:

1) Dain. Wythe Avenue, Williamsburg, Brooklyn.

2) Alice Mizrachi and Cope2. Boone Avenue, The Bronx.

3) Never Satisfied. Bedford Avenue, Williamsburg, Brooklyn.

4) gilf! Grattan Street, Bushwick, Brooklyn.

5) Jilly Ballistic. Astor Place 6 Train station, Manhattan.

6) Enzo and Nio. Wythe Avenue, Williamsburg, Brooklyn.

7) ND’A and Elle Deadsex. Jefferson Street, Bushwick, Brooklyn.

All photos by Yoav Litvin.

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In partnership with the New Museum’s Ideas City Festival, Centre-fuge’s Cycle 8, Influx in Flux, expanded to include additional containers on East 1st Street, along with wide panels inside the First Street Green Park. Here are a few images captured this past week:

Italian artist Federico Massa aka Cruz at work

Cruz

Brooklyn-based Elle at work

Elle

Brooklyn native Mor at work

Mor

Brooklyn-based ND’A

ND'A

Simply signed “Exit”

Exit

Veteran graffiti master Demer at work

Demer

The legendary Claw Money at work

Claw Money

NYC-based painter and musician Yuri Velez at work

Yuri Velez

Noted painter and sculptor Ray Smith

Ray Smith

Puerto Rican native Sofia Maldonado at work 

Sofia Maldonado

The young, talented members of Cre8tive YouTH*ink at work 

Cre8tive YouTH*ink

Recently cited in TimeOut New York as one of NYC’s Top Spots for Street Art, the Centre-fuge Public Art Project, under the curatorial vision of Pebbles Russell and Jonathan Neville, is committed to transforming transitional spaces and construction sites in New York City into public works of art. To assist the Centre-fuge Public Art Project with funds needed to continue and expand their project, check out its Indiegogo campaign.

Keep posted to our Facebook page for additional images of artwork by Sheryo, The Yok, Cram Concepts and more.

Photos by Lenny Collado, Dani Mozeson, Tara Murray & Lois Stavsky

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This is the fourth in a series of ongoing posts featuring the diverse range of stylish trucks and vans that strike NYC streets:

Noxer and 3ess in Bushwick, Brooklyn

"Noxer and 3ess graffiti"

Gano in Manhattan

"Gano graffiti"

Wen One in Manhattan

"Wen One graffiti"

 Deceve of Smart Crew

"Deceve graffiti"

Sebs in Bushwick, Brooklyn

"Sebs graffiti"

ND’A and See One in Bushwick, Brooklyn

"ND'A and See One"

See One close-up

"See One graffiti"

 Stem in Manhattan

"Stem graffiti"

Photos of Noxer & 3ess and ND’A close-up by Lois Stavsky; Gano, Wen One, NDA & See One by Dani Mozeson; Deceve by Lenny Collado; Sebs by City-as-School intern Damien Kelly and Stem by Sara Mozeson

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