Graffiti

Earlier this fall, the Dodworth Street Mural art project began a wondrous transformation of the area on and around Dodworth Street between Bushwick Avenue and Broadway. Here are just a few of the murals that have surfaced:

Eelco ’Virus’ Van den BergRocko and Vera Times

eelco rocko street art Dodworth Mural NYC Dodworth Street Mural Art Project with: Eelco, Rocko & Vera Times, David Louf, Miss Zukie & Lexi Bella, Fumero, Danielle Mastrion, CB23, Col, Marthalicia, BK, Damien Mitchell & Edob LOV3

David Louf 

David Louf dodworth street art Dodworth Street Mural Art Project with: Eelco, Rocko & Vera Times, David Louf, Miss Zukie & Lexi Bella, Fumero, Danielle Mastrion, CB23, Col, Marthalicia, BK, Damien Mitchell & Edob LOV3

Miss Zukie and Lexi Bella

zukie and lexi bella dodworth mural street art nyc 2 Dodworth Street Mural Art Project with: Eelco, Rocko & Vera Times, David Louf, Miss Zukie & Lexi Bella, Fumero, Danielle Mastrion, CB23, Col, Marthalicia, BK, Damien Mitchell & Edob LOV3

Fumero

Fumero street art dodworth Dodworth Street Mural Art Project with: Eelco, Rocko & Vera Times, David Louf, Miss Zukie & Lexi Bella, Fumero, Danielle Mastrion, CB23, Col, Marthalicia, BK, Damien Mitchell & Edob LOV3

Danielle Mastrion and CB23

danielle mastrion and cb street art dodworth mural NYC Dodworth Street Mural Art Project with: Eelco, Rocko & Vera Times, David Louf, Miss Zukie & Lexi Bella, Fumero, Danielle Mastrion, CB23, Col, Marthalicia, BK, Damien Mitchell & Edob LOV3

Col Wallnuts, Marthalicia, BK, Damien Mitchell & Edob LOV3

col mathalicia BK Damien Mitchell dodworth mural street art nyc Dodworth Street Mural Art Project with: Eelco, Rocko & Vera Times, David Louf, Miss Zukie & Lexi Bella, Fumero, Danielle Mastrion, CB23, Col, Marthalicia, BK, Damien Mitchell & Edob LOV3

Photo credits: 1, 3 – 5 Lois Stavsky; 2 & 6 Dani Reyes Mozeson 

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chalfant graffiti photography Moving Murals: Henry Chalfant & Martha Cooper’s All City Graffiti Archive through Thursday  with Closing Event Sat. 12/20 at City Lore

Moving Murals: Henry Chalfant & Martha Cooper’s All-City Graffiti Archive, a mosaic of 850 wall images of subway graffiti photographed by Chalfant – along with a series of Martha Cooper’s artist portraits — continues through this Thursday, December 18 at 4pm.  A homage to the boundless creativity of the graffiti artists whose talents and passions paved the way to the global street art movement, Moving Murals is the first exhibit to grace the City Lore Gallery at 56 East 1st Street.

Another close-up from Henry Chalfant collage, featuring the legendary Iz the Wiz

Henry Chalfant subway graffiti City Lore Moving Murals: Henry Chalfant & Martha Cooper’s All City Graffiti Archive through Thursday  with Closing Event Sat. 12/20 at City Lore

Martha Cooper’s portraits

Martha cooper Moving Murals City Lore Moving Murals: Henry Chalfant & Martha Cooper’s All City Graffiti Archive through Thursday  with Closing Event Sat. 12/20 at City Lore

Including such contemporaries as Lady Aiko (top left)

Martha cooper photography city lore nyc1 Moving Murals: Henry Chalfant & Martha Cooper’s All City Graffiti Archive through Thursday  with Closing Event Sat. 12/20 at City Lore

And next Saturday, December 20, 12pm – 6pm, you will have the opportunity to take home one of Henry Chalfant’s graffiti train prints as City Lore will be offering Chalfant’s train photographs from the Moving Murals exhibit with each membership purchased. Membership begins at $35. Hot cider and a variety of gifts by local NYC artists will also be available for sale at the City Lore Store

City Lore Moving Murals: Henry Chalfant & Martha Cooper’s All City Graffiti Archive through Thursday  with Closing Event Sat. 12/20 at City Lore

Moving Murals City Lore Moving Murals: Henry Chalfant & Martha Cooper’s All City Graffiti Archive through Thursday  with Closing Event Sat. 12/20 at City Lore

Final photo courtesy of City Lore; photos of Henry Chalfant’s installation by Lois Stavsky; of Martha Cooper’s by Dani Reyes Mozeson

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Currently based in Bogota, Colombia, the Australian artist CRISP continues to bring his vision to a range of spaces throughout the globe. We met up with him on his recent visit to NYC.

crisp political street art Speaking with Bogota Based Australian Artist CRISP in NYC

When did you first start painting on public surfaces? And where?

I’m a late bloomer, as back in Australia and during my time in the UK, I was mostly into sculpting and drawing.  But when I moved to Bogota, I became very interested in getting my art out in the street. That was over five years ago now, and I never looked back.

Were there any particular folks who inspired you?

Definitely the Canadian graffiti writer Opek — who was living in Bogota at the time — as he encouraged me to get my art up in the street. Dj Lu / Juegasiempre was an important influence, great support and my favorite stencil artist. Also the local work of Toxicómano , Guache, Kochino, Senil, Vogel, Praxis and others certainly inspired me.

Do you have any preferred surfaces?

The great thing about the urban space is that it’s filled with different textures and surfaces. In terms of my stencils, though, I generally like flat concrete ones, as they’re easier to work with and brighten up an otherwise dull, grey corner of the city.

crisp street art bogota Speaking with Bogota Based Australian Artist CRISP in NYC

Any thoughts on the graffiti/ street art divide?

To me they are one and the same. I try not to get into the politics. Live and let live I say. It’s all expression, creativity and passion.

Have you any thoughts about the corporate world’s engagement with graffiti and street art?

I’ve never liked how corporations have always been able to impose their images on our urban environment while graffiti and street art are almost always deemed illegal. Public spaces are for everybody, not just for companies that want to make sales and money. I feel uneasy how private corporations now use urban art to sell their brand, but I also understand that artists need to earn a living!

How you feel about the role of the Internet in this scene?

It’s changed everything.  So much more artwork is accessible to so many.  It’s not just the people in a particular neighborhood or city who can enjoy the pieces now. It also helps bring awareness to a wider audience of street artists from countries that are less visited or unknown. Bogota has one of the most prolific and best urban art scenes in the world, but not many people know about it or visit.

crisp mask Williamsburg NYC street art Speaking with Bogota Based Australian Artist CRISP in NYC

Do you have a formal arts education?

Not in the formal institutionalized sense, but both my parents are artists, and I grew up around art all my life. My dad is a sculptor, and my mom is a traditional painter. They taught me a lot from a very young age.

How do they feel about what you are doing these days?

They love it. I’ve even turned my mom on to street art! When she came to Bogota, she painted some walls with me!

What’s the riskiest thing you’ve done?

Well, I did get stabbed in the hand during a robbery this year while photographing street art in a dodgy neighborhood in Bogota. I was stupidly doing the wrong thing in the wrong place, and I learnt the hard way! I had to paint with my left hand for a few months while my right hand healed.

Crisp street art stencil portraits Speaking with Bogota Based Australian Artist CRISP in NYC

What inspires you these days to keep getting your art up in public spaces?

I love the idea of sharing my work with a wider audience without the limitations galleries and internal private spaces impose. And I love it when folks discover my work by chance and enjoy it! I want to be a part of a city’s visual landscape – the one I live in and the ones I visit.

What’s your ideal working environment?

Working in areas of cities where my street art will impact passersby by adding something to their commute, walk or day. Every city and street has its own unique aesthetic and feel.

Has your aesthetic been influenced by any particular cultures?

I’m especially influenced by Asian cultures and by different tribal aesthetics from around the world. Also popular culture, current world events and the environment influence my work. My work is a mix of socio-political and solely visual expression.

Crisp street art shutter NYC Speaking with Bogota Based Australian Artist CRISP in NYC

How has your work evolved in the past few years?

I work on larger surfaces, and I’m experimenting more with different materials and subject matters. I’m doing more complex stencils and experimenting with mixing free style with stencils. Also, I’ve started doing more sculptural works in the street through my masks.

Would you rather work alone, or do you prefer to collaborate with others?

Both. It’s always fun to collaborate with other artists, as it can add something new to all our pieces. Among the artists I’ve collaborated with are: Ronzo, Pez, DjLu, Dast, Tarboxx2, Miko and Kochino.

Where else – besides Bogota and NYC – have you gotten up?

I’ve gotten up in London, Mexico City, Miami, Atlanta, Sydney, Alaska, Canada and the Dominican Republic. May favorite place by far, though, is Bogota, Colombia!

crisp political stencil street art Speaking with Bogota Based Australian Artist CRISP in NYC

What do you see as the role of the artist in society?

To visually reflect a particular perspective of the history and culture of the times and place. The artist highlights a people’s social and political values in a way that’s aesthetically expressive and open to different interpretations.

What about the photographers and bloggers? How do you feel about them?

Urban art is continuously evolving, changing and disappearing. It’s important that it’s documented as eventually it won’t exist. And as I mentioned before, it helps people discover and learn about scenes and artists they wouldn’t generally access.

What’s ahead?

I want to keep painting and creating as much as possible. I want my work to keep evolving. I love combining my love of travel with street art, so I will keep mixing that up! My family and my art are the most important things in my life!

Interview by Lois Stavsky; photos 1, 2, 4 & 6 courtesy of the artist; photos 3 and 5 in Williamsburg, Brooklyn by Lois Stavsky 

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Sometimes they last for months; other times for weeks or even just days. But the graffiti that surfaces on Bushwick’s walls, particularly on those streets off the L line, are among NYC’s best.  Here’s a small sampling of what we captured last month:

Denver-based Home

home denver graffiti Bushwick NYC Bushwicks Stylish Graffiti Walls: Home, Owns, Rath, Spot, Yes1, Shiro, Gusto and Vers

Owns

owns bk Bushwicks Stylish Graffiti Walls: Home, Owns, Rath, Spot, Yes1, Shiro, Gusto and Vers

Rath

rath graffiti Bushwick NYC Bushwicks Stylish Graffiti Walls: Home, Owns, Rath, Spot, Yes1, Shiro, Gusto and Vers

Spot KMS captured at work; completed piece here

spot graffiti Bushwick NYC Bushwicks Stylish Graffiti Walls: Home, Owns, Rath, Spot, Yes1, Shiro, Gusto and Vers

Yes1 captured at work, with Shiro to his right

shiro yes1 paints graffiti nyc Bushwicks Stylish Graffiti Walls: Home, Owns, Rath, Spot, Yes1, Shiro, Gusto and Vers

Gusto

gusto graffiti Bushwick NYC Bushwicks Stylish Graffiti Walls: Home, Owns, Rath, Spot, Yes1, Shiro, Gusto and Vers

Vers

vers graffiti Bushwick NYC Bushwicks Stylish Graffiti Walls: Home, Owns, Rath, Spot, Yes1, Shiro, Gusto and Vers

Photos by Dani Reyes Mozeson

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Hottea Yarn Bombing street art Hottea on His Recent NYC Installation, Gentrification and UUGGHH

Last month, Minneapolis-based artist Eric Rieger aka Hottea came to NYC with a message. Here’s what he has to say about his installation on the iconic, recently-purchased building on Bowery and Spring Street:

Can you tell us something about this specific site?  What is its significance to you?

This building used to be the old Germania Bank and was built in 1898-99.  Today it is no longer a bank, but a residence.  For such a big building you would think that there is more than one tenant.  Not the case.  There is only one family living there, and that is the family of Jay Maisel.  Unfortunately, this is not for much longer.  He reportedly sold the property for 50 million dollars.  That is quite the profit considering he bought it for around 100k.  Over the years that Jay and his family lived there, they refused to clean its exterior walls.  The outcome was a collage of graffiti, wheatepastes and stickers. This building is significant to me because it made me think of a different way of installing my work.

HotTea spring street Hottea on His Recent NYC Installation, Gentrification and UUGGHH

Why did you choose to install the word “UUGGHH?”

I wanted this piece to be about the recent purchase of the building and the decision to turn it into a condo development/private gallery space.  I have seen gentrification taking place all over the world, and NYC is no stranger to it.  There are so many iconic buildings that are lost due to the desire for “New.”

Hottea street art installation NYC Hottea on His Recent NYC Installation, Gentrification and UUGGHH

What about the process of the installation?  How did you go about it?  How long did it take?

The process was done in three parts.  I did a lot of organizing in my hometown of Minneapolis, such as ordering lumber, reserving a moving truck, etc.  The second part was gathering all the materials once in NYC and building the lettering.  This proved to be much more complicated than I was expecting.  Many of the supplies were hauled via the subway and once on site, there was little room to work.  We used an abandoned lot, but got kicked out so we just worked in front of where I was staying.  Not much room at all.  The third and final part was hauling the letters on site and installing. The whole process from beginning to end took about two weeks.

Hottea street art bowery and spring Hottea on His Recent NYC Installation, Gentrification and UUGGHH

What kinds of responses has your installation received?

A lot of people were curious when I was installing.  They were curious as to what it meant and who it was for.  I think a lot of people assume that if you are wearing a reflective vest and working during the day, that you must be doing something for a brand or for the city.  This installation was done to remember what NYC once used to be.  I was never able to experience it first-hand, but through images and video I was able to sense the energy and spirit behind the work being done. The reactions have been like mine.  UUGGHH, not another building lost to gentrification.  

And for a wonderful documentation of it all, check out this video.

All photos courtesy Hottea

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Keith Haring art at Dorian Grey Gallery NYC1 East Village Alchemy Continues through Sunday at Dorian Grey with: Keith Haring, Paolo Buggiani, Ken Hiratsuka and Scot Borofsky

Dorian Grey‘s current exhibit, East Village Alchemy, takes us on a magical foray through the East Village’s 1980′s street art scene presenting a range of artworks by four of its key practitioners. Here’s a sampling:

Keith Haring subway drawing, early 80′s

keith haring subway art dorian grey gallery East Village Alchemy Continues through Sunday at Dorian Grey with: Keith Haring, Paolo Buggiani, Ken Hiratsuka and Scot Borofsky

Paolo Buggiani, Performance Art, Unsuccessful Attack to the World Trade Center, 1983

Paolo Buggiani dorian grey East Village Alchemy Continues through Sunday at Dorian Grey with: Keith Haring, Paolo Buggiani, Ken Hiratsuka and Scot Borofsky

 Ken Hiratsuka, whose intricately-carved artworks have been part of our city’s visual landscape since the early 80′s

Ken Hiratsuka dorian grey East Village Alchemy Continues through Sunday at Dorian Grey with: Keith Haring, Paolo Buggiani, Ken Hiratsuka and Scot Borofsky

Scot Borofsky, whose symbol-based graphics graced the walls of the East Village in the 80′s

scot borofsky primitive art dorian grey East Village Alchemy Continues through Sunday at Dorian Grey with: Keith Haring, Paolo Buggiani, Ken Hiratsuka and Scot Borofsky

scot borofsky art dorian grey gallery nyc East Village Alchemy Continues through Sunday at Dorian Grey with: Keith Haring, Paolo Buggiani, Ken Hiratsuka and Scot Borofsky

The Dorian Grey Gallery is located at 437 East 9th Street at Avenue A in Manhattan’s East Village..

Photos of artworks 2-6 on exhibit by Dani Reyes Mozeson

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This is the 14th in an occasional series of posts featuring images of girls — and women — who grace our public spaces:

Dasic in Bushwick

dasic street art NYC Girls on Walls, Part XIV: Dasic, Ben Angotti, Fusca & Kazy, Swoon, Ree2 & Teck1 and Alice Mizrachi

Ben Angotti in Bushwick

ben angotti bk Girls on Walls, Part XIV: Dasic, Ben Angotti, Fusca & Kazy, Swoon, Ree2 & Teck1 and Alice Mizrachi

Mexican artist Fusca and French artist Kazy in Bedford-Stuyvesant

Fusca Kazy mural art Brooklyn copy 2 Girls on Walls, Part XIV: Dasic, Ben Angotti, Fusca & Kazy, Swoon, Ree2 & Teck1 and Alice Mizrachi

Swoon in Red Hook

swooninredhook Girls on Walls, Part XIV: Dasic, Ben Angotti, Fusca & Kazy, Swoon, Ree2 & Teck1 and Alice Mizrachi

Ree2 and Teck1 in Washington Heights

Ree2 and Teck1 Inwood Girls on Walls, Part XIV: Dasic, Ben Angotti, Fusca & Kazy, Swoon, Ree2 & Teck1 and Alice Mizrachi

Alice Mizrachi in the Rockaways

alice mizrachi street art rockaways Girls on Walls, Part XIV: Dasic, Ben Angotti, Fusca & Kazy, Swoon, Ree2 & Teck1 and Alice Mizrachi

Photos: 1, 2 & 4 by Dani Reyes Mozeson; 3 & 5 by Lois Stavsky and 6 by Tara Murray

Note: StreetArtNYC will be on vacation through December 1. Follow what’s happening here in NYC on our Facebook page.

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cycle street art graffiti NYC A Visit to 106 Bayard with: Cycle, Part One, Dr. Revolt, Wolf 1 AOK, Futura, Lady Pink, Team, Whisper, Pure TFP and more

Straddling the border between Williamsburg and Greenpoint, the building at 106 Bayard Street was transformed this past spring into a 3,000-square foot outdoor canvas.  The 70′s and 80′s NYC subway and graffiti movement was the theme of the inaugural 106 Bayard mural project, curated by Gee Dajani and Keene Carse.  Here are a few more images from both the exterior and interior of 106 Bayard captured when we recently revisited the spot.

Part One, Dr. Revolt, Wolf 1 AOK and Futura

Part Revolt Wolf Futura street art and graffiti NYC A Visit to 106 Bayard with: Cycle, Part One, Dr. Revolt, Wolf 1 AOK, Futura, Lady Pink, Team, Whisper, Pure TFP and more

Lady Pink

lady pink street art mural nyc. A Visit to 106 Bayard with: Cycle, Part One, Dr. Revolt, Wolf 1 AOK, Futura, Lady Pink, Team, Whisper, Pure TFP and more

A wide view from across the street with Part OneDr. Revolt, Wolf 1 AOK, Futura and Team

Part wolf futura team 106 bayard graffti street art nyc A Visit to 106 Bayard with: Cycle, Part One, Dr. Revolt, Wolf 1 AOK, Futura, Lady Pink, Team, Whisper, Pure TFP and more

And inside – Whisper and Pure TFP, segment of huge mural

whisper graffiti nyc A Visit to 106 Bayard with: Cycle, Part One, Dr. Revolt, Wolf 1 AOK, Futura, Lady Pink, Team, Whisper, Pure TFP and more

Created and sponsored by Cirkers Fine Art Storage & Logistics, 106 Bayard will be transformed once again this coming spring.

Note: First photo features the legendary Cycle with Jackson and artwork by Williamsburg Charter High School students.

Photo credits: 1, 4 & 5 by Dani Reyes Mozeson; 2 & 3 by Lois Stavsky

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An innovative line of hoodies with interchangeable, collectible art-inspired hoods provides a new canvas for artists, including some of NYC’s street artists. Curious about it all, we posed some questions to Amisha Patel, the founder and CEO of Le Collektor.

What inspired you to bring the art that we see on our city’s streets and galleries to hoodies?

The outcry and public debate around the whitewashing of 5Pointz reminded me of what street art is all about. It’s such a pure form of self-expression — truly democratic in nature. At its root is a desire to be seen and heard. And while I think it’s great for artists that street art has been recognized by traditional art collectors and galleries, we wanted to find a way to bring its democratic spirit to its original fans – people on the streets. The hoodie – a streetwear classic – seemed a great way to do it.

sonni street art bushwick Le Collektor Fashions Moveable Art Galleries with Hoodies Designed by Sonni, Chris Uphues, Joseph Meloy and more

Sonni street art nyc  Le Collektor Fashions Moveable Art Galleries with Hoodies Designed by Sonni, Chris Uphues, Joseph Meloy and more

Sonni art hoodie copy Le Collektor Fashions Moveable Art Galleries with Hoodies Designed by Sonni, Chris Uphues, Joseph Meloy and more

How did you select the particular artists who are participating in this venture?

We approached it as if we were curating a group show that artists would want to attend. We wanted to showcase distinct styles that could be seen in cities around the world. We also wanted to work with artists who were  on board with what we’re trying to do. Our inaugural artists – Nick Gazin, Chris Uphues, Sonni, Dru Brennan, EWOK, David R. Head, Jr. and Joseph Meloy – have been amazingly supportive, and we very much appreciate that they trust a new brand with their work.

How have the artists responded to your mission? 

The artists love the idea. It gives them a direct way to connect to fans — especially those who aren’t in cities that have street art scenes. Everyone also really loves the way the hoodies turned out.

Which artists – based here in NYC – are you featuring?

Joseph Meloy, Nick Gazin, SonniChris Uphues and David R. Head, Jr

Chris Uphues street art williamsburg NYC Le Collektor Fashions Moveable Art Galleries with Hoodies Designed by Sonni, Chris Uphues, Joseph Meloy and more

Chris Uphues street art Bushwick jpg Le Collektor Fashions Moveable Art Galleries with Hoodies Designed by Sonni, Chris Uphues, Joseph Meloy and more

uphues art hoodie  Le Collektor Fashions Moveable Art Galleries with Hoodies Designed by Sonni, Chris Uphues, Joseph Meloy and more

How can artists join this project?

We’d love to grow our list of collaborators! Artists can email me directly at amisha@lecollektor.com

Can you tell us something about the hoodie itself? Who will be manufacturing it?

We wanted our hoodie to be the go-to so we made sure that it was worthy of the art on its hoods. It’s being made by a factory in Los Angeles that we found through our friends at Bleick Studio who work with some of the best streetwear brands out there:

  • Super soft 13 oz. brushed Sherpa fleece locally knitted in Los Angeles
  • Flat-locked seams for extra durability
  • Ribbed side panels for a close fit and extra warmth
  • Pre-washed and shrunk to fit
  • Classic ribbed bomber collar to wear jacket without a hood
  • Rope drawcords with custom metal tips
  • Hidden phone pocket with headphone port

Joseph Meloy street art Le Collektor Fashions Moveable Art Galleries with Hoodies Designed by Sonni, Chris Uphues, Joseph Meloy and more

Joseph Meloy artwork on NYC container Le Collektor Fashions Moveable Art Galleries with Hoodies Designed by Sonni, Chris Uphues, Joseph Meloy and more

meloy art hoodie  Le Collektor Fashions Moveable Art Galleries with Hoodies Designed by Sonni, Chris Uphues, Joseph Meloy and more

Why did you launch a Kickstarter? Can you tell us something about it?   

Big brands use artists’ work all the time, but we want to build our brand around the artwork in a way that it will provide artists with meaningful income directly from their fans.  Kickstarter seemed the perfect platform to engage directly with artists’ fans and with the creatively-minded community we want to build around Le Collektor. It’s about bringing big ideas to life, and — really more than any other company out there — it has created a new class of everyday patrons of the arts – which is in line with our company’s mission. So far, it’s been very exciting to see all of the support and love for what we’re doing. We’re a Kickstarter staff pick, and artists have written in from all over saying they’d love to be part of the movement.

Note: You can check out and support Le Collektor’s Kickstarter here.

Photo credits: 1. Sonni on Bushwick rooftop, Lois Stavsky; 2. Sonni in the East Village, Tara Murray; 3. Sonni hood, courtesy of Le Collecktor; 4. and 5. Chris Uphues in Williamsburg, Lois Stavsky; 6. Chris Uphues hood, courtesy of Le Collecktor; 7. Joseph Meloy at Welling Court, Dani Reyes Mozeson; 8. Joseph Meloy for the Centre-fuge Public Art Project, Tara Murray; 9. Joseph Meloy hood, courtesy of Le Collecktor

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The x spot East Harlem graffiti The X Spot Arrives in East Harlem with Custom Graffiti Art and more by Topaz, Jerms, Treat Street...

Topaz – one of the most active members of the hip-hop and 5Pointz communities – began customizing T-shirts when he was in junior high school. His most recent venture is the X-Spot, a unique space at 2 East 116th Street in East Harlem. We recently visited him and had the opportunity to speak to both Topaz and Jay, the manager of Production X.

topaz graffiti The X Spot Arrives in East Harlem with Custom Graffiti Art and more by Topaz, Jerms, Treat Street...

How did you guys come up with the idea to open such a space?

We grew up together in Rego Park, Queens, and we’ve been working together for years. We’ve actually had two stores before – one in Paterson, New Jersey and the other in South Carolina. We wanted to do something different from what we’d done in the past.

Jerms graffiti map The X Spot Arrives in East Harlem with Custom Graffiti Art and more by Topaz, Jerms, Treat Street...

In what ways is this venture different?

Our emphasis here is on providing services and maintaining a gallery.  It is production-based. Although we sell graffiti art on canvases, select magazines — like the latest issue of Flashbacks — and CD’s, our space here is not primarily a store or shop.

Jerms Topaz and Blone graffiti on canvas The X Spot Arrives in East Harlem with Custom Graffiti Art and more by Topaz, Jerms, Treat Street...

What are some of the services that you provide?

We provide clients with all forms of graphic design — customized murals, logos, portraits, canvases, T-shirts and more.

Jay ProductionX with street treat graffiti The X Spot Arrives in East Harlem with Custom Graffiti Art and more by Topaz, Jerms, Treat Street...

It sounds – and looks – great! Whom do you see as your principal clientele?

At this point, it is largely the hip-hop community – rappers and entertainers. But, ideally, the general public, especially as graffiti continues to gain respect and recognition as an art form.

Treat Street graffiti on canvas The X Spot Arrives in East Harlem with Custom Graffiti Art and more by Topaz, Jerms, Treat Street...

This is such a great location! It’s right off 5th Avenue in East Harlem and down the block from the 2 and 5 subway lines. How did you guys come up with such a great locale?

A lucky set of circumstances – as Jay’s cousin had previously worked at this location.

Poet Pace Jerms Sav Ice graffiti on canvas gallery The X Spot Arrives in East Harlem with Custom Graffiti Art and more by Topaz, Jerms, Treat Street...

The artwork on display here is primarily by you, TopazJerms and Treat Street NY. Are you open to other artists participating in your projects?

Absolutely.  Talented and committed artists can stop by our space or drop us an email at ProductionX@aol.com or LordRoccolypse@aol.com.

Photo credits: 1. and 2. Topaz by City-as-School intern Tyler Dean Flores; 3. Jerms by Lois Stavsky; 4. Jerms, Topaz & Blone by Lois Stavsky; 5. Treat Street with Jay (X-Productions) by Lois Stavsky; 6. Treat Street, as commissioned by Derek Jeter’s nephew, by Lois Stavsky and 7. PoetPaceJermsSav, Ice and more by Dani Reyes Mozeson

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