Graffiti

Reclaimed, Meres One‘s solo exhibit at Bushwick’s Low Brow Artique, brilliantly celebrates Meres‘s wonderful talents and his love of graffiti. I spoke to Meres soon after visiting the exhibit:

meres graffiti art Meres One on <em>Reclaimed</em>: His Solo Exhibit at Low Brow Artique

Can you tell us something about the title of the exhibit, Reclaimed? What does it mean?

After many months of coping with the loss of 5Pointz, Reclaimed is my way of revisiting and reclaiming my early days as a graffiti artist.

Meres graffiti colors Meres One on <em>Reclaimed</em>: His Solo Exhibit at Low Brow Artique

When did you first come up with the concept with the exhibit?  And can you tell us something about the process of preparing for it? 

I came up with the general idea in January, and when I showed some of the pieces I was working on to Bishop, he offered me a solo show at Low Brow Artique. In preparation, I revisited hundreds of photos of walls that I had painted at 5Pointz. My next step was to reinterpret them — selecting fragments from them and honoring my appreciation of hand-style.

Meres graffiti character Meres One on <em>Reclaimed</em>: His Solo Exhibit at Low Brow Artique

What about the centerpiece? It is so impressive! Its texture is just beautiful. It looks as though it was painted on reclaimed wood.

Yes, I painted it on a piece of wood that was reclaimed from the Coney Island boardwalk. I love that it has taken on a new life in this exhibit.

Meres Reclaimed found wood Meres One on <em>Reclaimed</em>: His Solo Exhibit at Low Brow Artique

How has the response been to the exhibit?

It’s been great! The opening was wonderful, and only two pieces remain. The others were sold shortly after the exhibit opened. I am currently preparing for a Part II, where I will take my work on this same concept to another — more abstract — level while working on a range of different surfaces.

Meres graffiti art at lowbrow artique Meres One on <em>Reclaimed</em>: His Solo Exhibit at Low Brow Artique

Note: Reclaimed remains on view at Low Brow Artique through Saturday May 9.  Now open seven days a week, Low Brow Artique is situated at 143 Central Avenue in Bushwick, Brooklyn.

Interview and photos by Lois Stavsky 

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Boone Room Bronx graffiti Cope2 Celebrating the Launch of the Boone Room Website Tonight at Exit Room

Some of NYC’s most vibrant and striking murals–on Boone Avenue between 172nd and 173rd Streets in the Bronx–were demolished last year to be replaced by residential buildings. But thanks to the efforts of SLO Architecture, various artists, neighboring Fannie Lou Hamer High School, Maria Krajewski, City-As-School students and several others, the spirit of Boone Avenue lives. Featuring dozens of images, interviews and more, the Boone Room website, constructed by City-As-School students, can now be viewed online. To celebrate its launch, the public is invited to join the City-As-School family, several of the artists and a host of performers and musicians tonight at Exit Room.

 Artists interviewed for the Boone Room website include: Cope2, Eric Orr, Marthalecia and Valerie Larko who has preserved the walls in her amazing photorealistic paintings.

Screen Shot 2015 04 14 at 3.59.41 PM.png Celebrating the Launch of the Boone Room Website Tonight at Exit Room

Lady K Fever

Lady K Fever graffiti Bronx NYC Celebrating the Launch of the Boone Room Website Tonight at Exit Room

Kashink — who was visiting NYC from Paris — to the left of Lady K Fever

Kashink Lady K Fever Street Art graffiti Bronx NYC Celebrating the Launch of the Boone Room Website Tonight at Exit Room

 Tonight at 270 Meserole Street in Bushwick

Boone Room Launch Party Celebrating the Launch of the Boone Room Website Tonight at Exit Room

Post by City-As-School intern Zachariah Messaoud with Lois Stavsky; photos 3 and 4 courtesy Maria Krajewski

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In this third in our series of interviews with artists born abroad who have made NYC home, we feature Pesu. Inspired by hip-hop, Pesu began his art career back in Japan in 1996 as a graffiti writer. Here in NYC he is best-known for his live painting in various venues and the many Art Battle competitions he has won. His works on canvas in a multiplicity of styles — from stencil art to abstract art — increasingly attract collectors, as well.

Pesu stencil art einstein PESU: From Fuji, Shizuoka to Manhattan’s East Village

When did you first visit NY? And what brought you here?

In 2001 I left Japan for Sacramento, California on a student visa. But life there was too slow for me. So in 2004, I decided to check out New York City.

What was your impression of it at the time?

I was thoroughly overwhelmed. I remember walking on 5th Avenue and crying – tears of joy! This city has everything: so much energy, art, graffiti, mix of people and amazing architecture. And there is always something happening here.

Pesu black book graffiti PESU: From Fuji, Shizuoka to Manhattan’s East Village

What is the image of NYC in your native country?

Back in Japan we think of NYC as the number one city in the world. It is the place of opportunity.

Do you think this is accurate? Why or why not?

Yes! I agree! Everything is possible here in NYC.

Pesu art face  PESU: From Fuji, Shizuoka to Manhattan’s East Village

When did you decide to move here? And why?

I decided to move here the following year – in 2005. Why? Because I loved it!

How did your family feel about your move?

They were great. Everyone was very supportive. And they were always worried about me when I was doing graffiti back in Japan.

Pesu blackbook graffiti PESU: From Fuji, Shizuoka to Manhattan’s East Village

What were some of the challenges you faced when you first moved here?

I had to find a way to earn money. And I had to worry about having a visa. I also wasn’t used to living in such a competitive city.

You now have a great space in the East Village. Where did you live when you first moved here? And why did you choose that particular neighborhood?

When I first moved here, I lived in Bed-Stuy.  I found the apartment through a broker. I chose Bed-Stuy because I love Biggie so much.

Pesu abstract PESU: From Fuji, Shizuoka to Manhattan’s East Village

Have you encountered any prejudice here?

Yes. I’ve encountered some. Folks here are not all that accustomed to seeing Asians in the hip-hop scene.

How has your artwork evolved or changed since you came here?

I tend to use brighter, more vivid colors. My art is more alive here in NYC! And it’s become more professional.

Pesu and shiro graffiti art PESU: From Fuji, Shizuoka to Manhattan’s East Village

How receptive have New Yorkers been to your artwork? To you?

They seem somewhat surprised by what I do, as they are not used to seeing Asians in this scene!

What would you like to accomplish here?

As an artist, I want to make people happy. And on a more personal level, I would like to bring my parents to America.

Pesu fine art PESU: From Fuji, Shizuoka to Manhattan’s East Village

What do you miss most about your native country?

My parents and the food I ate back in Japan.

Interview by Lois Stavsky with City-as-School intern Zachariah Messaoud; photos 1-4, 6 (collab with Shiro) & 7 by Lois Stavsky; 5 by Zachariah Messaoud; images  2 & 4 are from Pesu’s blackbooks from the late 90′s.

Note: Several of Pesu’s works will be on exhibit in Brooklyn is the Future opening Friday at the Vazquez at 93 Forrest Street in Bushwick.

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This is the twelfth in a series of occasional posts featuring the diverse range of trucks and vans that strike our streets.

Cern

cern art on NYC truck NYC’s Stylish Trucks & Vans – from the Whimsical to the Wild, Part XII: Cern, CashRFC, Keely, Cone, YNN, NME, Frank Ape and more

Cash RFC

Cash rfc graffiti on truck NYC’s Stylish Trucks & Vans – from the Whimsical to the Wild, Part XII: Cern, CashRFC, Keely, Cone, YNN, NME, Frank Ape and more

Keely, Deeker… 

Keely and Deeker art on van NYC NYC’s Stylish Trucks & Vans – from the Whimsical to the Wild, Part XII: Cern, CashRFC, Keely, Cone, YNN, NME, Frank Ape and more

Cone

cone graffiti truck nyc NYC’s Stylish Trucks & Vans – from the Whimsical to the Wild, Part XII: Cern, CashRFC, Keely, Cone, YNN, NME, Frank Ape and more

YNN

ynn graffiti truck nyc NYC’s Stylish Trucks & Vans – from the Whimsical to the Wild, Part XII: Cern, CashRFC, Keely, Cone, YNN, NME, Frank Ape and more

NME

nme art truck nyc  NYC’s Stylish Trucks & Vans – from the Whimsical to the Wild, Part XII: Cern, CashRFC, Keely, Cone, YNN, NME, Frank Ape and more

Frank Ape

frank ape art truck NYC’s Stylish Trucks & Vans – from the Whimsical to the Wild, Part XII: Cern, CashRFC, Keely, Cone, YNN, NME, Frank Ape and more

Photo Credits: 1 Tara Murray; 2, 3, 6 & 7 Dani Reyes Mozeson; 4 Lois Stavsky; 5 Houda Lazrak

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keith haring close up untitled 1984 <em>Keith Haring: Heaven and Hell</em> at Skarstedt in Chelsea through April 18

Unlike so many of Keith Haring‘s playfully iconic works that exude a child-like innocence, the huge works on exhibit in Heaven and Hell largely suggest an eerie darkness and unfettered eroticism. Here’s a sampling:

Wide view of two untitled works, 1984

keith haring <em>Keith Haring: Heaven and Hell</em> at Skarstedt in Chelsea through April 18

Untitled, 1985

Keith haring Untitled 1985 <em>Keith Haring: Heaven and Hell</em> at Skarstedt in Chelsea through April 18

Untitled, 1984

keith haring untitled artwork 1984 <em>Keith Haring: Heaven and Hell</em> at Skarstedt in Chelsea through April 18

Untitled, 1984

Keith Haring art <em>Keith Haring: Heaven and Hell</em> at Skarstedt in Chelsea through April 18

Heaven and Hell remains on exhibit at Skarstedt at 550 West 21 Street through next Saturday.

Photos of images: 1, 4 and 5 City-as-School intern Zachariah Messaoud; 2 and 3 Dani Reyes Mozeson. Note: First photo is a close-up from the huge mural below it (R).

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In an eclectic range of visual styles and themes, music makes it way to NYC walls. Here  is a small sampling:

Zeso, close-up from huge mural in Bushwick

zeso close up Silent Music on NYC Streets: Zeso, Andre Trenier, Kingbee, Pose2, Chemis, Meres, Slone, See TF, Shiro, Manny Vega, Sonni and more

Andre Trenier, lead artist, in the Bronx

andre collaborative Silent Music on NYC Streets: Zeso, Andre Trenier, Kingbee, Pose2, Chemis, Meres, Slone, See TF, Shiro, Manny Vega, Sonni and more

 Kingbee, Pose2 and Chemis in East Harlem

kingbee pose2 chemis harlem street art Silent Music on NYC Streets: Zeso, Andre Trenier, Kingbee, Pose2, Chemis, Meres, Slone, See TF, Shiro, Manny Vega, Sonni and more

MeresSloneSee TFShiroIZK and more in Bushwick

hip hop street art bk Silent Music on NYC Streets: Zeso, Andre Trenier, Kingbee, Pose2, Chemis, Meres, Slone, See TF, Shiro, Manny Vega, Sonni and more

Close-up

meres and slone street art nyc Silent Music on NYC Streets: Zeso, Andre Trenier, Kingbee, Pose2, Chemis, Meres, Slone, See TF, Shiro, Manny Vega, Sonni and more

Manny Vega in East Harlem

Manny Vega street art portraits NYC Silent Music on NYC Streets: Zeso, Andre Trenier, Kingbee, Pose2, Chemis, Meres, Slone, See TF, Shiro, Manny Vega, Sonni and more

Sonni in Bushwick

Sonni street art NYC  Silent Music on NYC Streets: Zeso, Andre Trenier, Kingbee, Pose2, Chemis, Meres, Slone, See TF, Shiro, Manny Vega, Sonni and more

Mike Brown on the Lower East Side

Mike Brown street art nyc Silent Music on NYC Streets: Zeso, Andre Trenier, Kingbee, Pose2, Chemis, Meres, Slone, See TF, Shiro, Manny Vega, Sonni and more

Unidentified artist in Bedford-Stuyvesant

unidentified bed stuy nyc Silent Music on NYC Streets: Zeso, Andre Trenier, Kingbee, Pose2, Chemis, Meres, Slone, See TF, Shiro, Manny Vega, Sonni and more

Photo credits: 1, 2, 5 – 9 Lois Stavsky; 3 Dani Reyes Mozeson; 4 Tara Murray

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frank lexi Bella Kosbe the best of the worst Street Art Prankster Hanksy Brings <em>The Best of the Worst</em> to NYC: Frank Ape, Lexi Bella, Cosbe, Miss Zukie, CB23, Magda Love, Meres, Russell King, Col, UR New York, Mr. Toll, El Sol 25 and much more

The following guest post is by Houda Lazrak, a graduate student in Museum Studies at New York University.  

This past weekend, Hanksy’s much-anticipated show, The Best of the Worst, drew hundreds of street art fans to the former Chase Bank at 104 Delancey Street on Manhattan’s Lower East Side. Along with some of NYC’s most notable graffiti writers and street artists, Hanksy transformed the space into a NYC playground-like arena — with a skate ramp, a Chinese massage parlor and more wonderfully-engaging site-specific installations. Dozens of intriguing, overlapping pieces, paste-ups and stickers paid homage to street art, while, also, poking fun at the scene.

Miss Zukie

Miss Zukie  Street Art Prankster Hanksy Brings <em>The Best of the Worst</em> to NYC: Frank Ape, Lexi Bella, Cosbe, Miss Zukie, CB23, Magda Love, Meres, Russell King, Col, UR New York, Mr. Toll, El Sol 25 and much more

CB23 

CB23 Street Art Prankster Hanksy Brings <em>The Best of the Worst</em> to NYC: Frank Ape, Lexi Bella, Cosbe, Miss Zukie, CB23, Magda Love, Meres, Russell King, Col, UR New York, Mr. Toll, El Sol 25 and much more

Magda Love and Hanksy and more

Magda Love Street Art Prankster Hanksy Brings <em>The Best of the Worst</em> to NYC: Frank Ape, Lexi Bella, Cosbe, Miss Zukie, CB23, Magda Love, Meres, Russell King, Col, UR New York, Mr. Toll, El Sol 25 and much more

Meres and more

Meres the best of the worst Street Art Prankster Hanksy Brings <em>The Best of the Worst</em> to NYC: Frank Ape, Lexi Bella, Cosbe, Miss Zukie, CB23, Magda Love, Meres, Russell King, Col, UR New York, Mr. Toll, El Sol 25 and much more

Russell King, Col and UR New York

Russell King more Street Art Prankster Hanksy Brings <em>The Best of the Worst</em> to NYC: Frank Ape, Lexi Bella, Cosbe, Miss Zukie, CB23, Magda Love, Meres, Russell King, Col, UR New York, Mr. Toll, El Sol 25 and much more

Hanksy

Hanksy the best of the worst Street Art Prankster Hanksy Brings <em>The Best of the Worst</em> to NYC: Frank Ape, Lexi Bella, Cosbe, Miss Zukie, CB23, Magda Love, Meres, Russell King, Col, UR New York, Mr. Toll, El Sol 25 and much more

Included, too, was a rather formally installed art exhibit in the wittily-titled Gag-Osian Gallery featuring some of NYC’s most popular street artists.

Mr. Toll at the Gag-Osian

Mr toll Street Art Prankster Hanksy Brings <em>The Best of the Worst</em> to NYC: Frank Ape, Lexi Bella, Cosbe, Miss Zukie, CB23, Magda Love, Meres, Russell King, Col, UR New York, Mr. Toll, El Sol 25 and much more

El Sol 25 at the Gag-Osian

El Sol25 Street Art Prankster Hanksy Brings <em>The Best of the Worst</em> to NYC: Frank Ape, Lexi Bella, Cosbe, Miss Zukie, CB23, Magda Love, Meres, Russell King, Col, UR New York, Mr. Toll, El Sol 25 and much more

All photos by Houda Lazrak; pictured in the first photo are Frank Ape, Lexi Bella and Cosbe

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This is the ninth in a series of occasional posts featuring the range of faces that surface on NYC open spaces:

James Bullough at the Bushwick Collective

James Bullough street art Bushwick Collective NYC Faces in NYC Public Spaces, Part IX: James Bullough, Alan Aine, Vexta, Zimad, Anser, Sam Kirk and Rafael de los Santos

Alan Aine in Bedford-Stuyvesant

alan aine street art bed stuy Faces in NYC Public Spaces, Part IX: James Bullough, Alan Aine, Vexta, Zimad, Anser, Sam Kirk and Rafael de los Santos

Vexta in the East Village

vexta east village street art nyc Faces in NYC Public Spaces, Part IX: James Bullough, Alan Aine, Vexta, Zimad, Anser, Sam Kirk and Rafael de los Santos

Zimad at the Bushwick Collective

zimad street art nyc Faces in NYC Public Spaces, Part IX: James Bullough, Alan Aine, Vexta, Zimad, Anser, Sam Kirk and Rafael de los Santos

Anser in Bushwick

anser street art bushwick nyc Faces in NYC Public Spaces, Part IX: James Bullough, Alan Aine, Vexta, Zimad, Anser, Sam Kirk and Rafael de los Santos

Sam Kirk in Williamsburg

provoke culture street art nyc Faces in NYC Public Spaces, Part IX: James Bullough, Alan Aine, Vexta, Zimad, Anser, Sam Kirk and Rafael de los Santos

Rafael de los Santos aka Poteleche in Williamsburg

HD Crew Street art nyc Faces in NYC Public Spaces, Part IX: James Bullough, Alan Aine, Vexta, Zimad, Anser, Sam Kirk and Rafael de los Santos

Photo credits: 1 & 3. Tara Murray; 2, 4, 6 & 7 Lois Stavsky; 5. Dani Reyes Mozeson

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The first day of spring 2015 brought wintry snow to NYC. Here are a few images I captured while in Greenpoint for the day:

 Phetus

phetus greenpoint Back to Greenpoint on a Snowy First Day of Spring with Phetus, Matthew Denton Burrows, Cern, Faring Purth, Shiro, Yes One, Tone. Miro & more

Matthew Denton Burrows

matthew denton burrows street art nyc Back to Greenpoint on a Snowy First Day of Spring with Phetus, Matthew Denton Burrows, Cern, Faring Purth, Shiro, Yes One, Tone. Miro & more

Cern

Cern street art greenpoint Brooklyn NYC Back to Greenpoint on a Snowy First Day of Spring with Phetus, Matthew Denton Burrows, Cern, Faring Purth, Shiro, Yes One, Tone. Miro & more

Tone

tone greenpoint Back to Greenpoint on a Snowy First Day of Spring with Phetus, Matthew Denton Burrows, Cern, Faring Purth, Shiro, Yes One, Tone. Miro & more

 Faring Purth

Farin Purth greenpoint NYC Back to Greenpoint on a Snowy First Day of Spring with Phetus, Matthew Denton Burrows, Cern, Faring Purth, Shiro, Yes One, Tone. Miro & more

ShiroYes One and Tone MST

shiro yes1 tone graffiti greenpoint nyc Back to Greenpoint on a Snowy First Day of Spring with Phetus, Matthew Denton Burrows, Cern, Faring Purth, Shiro, Yes One, Tone. Miro & more

To be identified

greenpoint graffiti nyc Back to Greenpoint on a Snowy First Day of Spring with Phetus, Matthew Denton Burrows, Cern, Faring Purth, Shiro, Yes One, Tone. Miro & more

 Miro RIS (& Shiro, top right)

Miro graffiti Greenpoint nyc Back to Greenpoint on a Snowy First Day of Spring with Phetus, Matthew Denton Burrows, Cern, Faring Purth, Shiro, Yes One, Tone. Miro & more 

Photos by Lois Stavsky

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Home to three distinct galleries – Artemisia GalleryAzart Gallery and MZ Urban Art – Chelsea 27 is currently presenting Spring Group Show featuring works by an eclectic range of emerging and established international artists. While visiting the gallery yesterday, we had the opportunity to speak to Marina Hadley, owner of MZ Urban Art.

pez azart <em>Spring Group Show</em> at Chelsea 27: El Pez, Kokian, Sliks, Sen2, Esther Barend, Kurar, Joyce DiBona and more

Can you tell us something about Chelsea 27?  This current exhibit features artworks presented by three distinct galleries, yet the pieces seem to seamlessly work together. 

We are three friends. I had previously worked with Latifa Metheny, the owner of Azart Gallery, at 547 West 27th Street, and I met Christine Jeanquier, who runs Artemisia Gallery, through a mutual friend.  We respect each other’s visions and choices.

kokian artwork artemisia <em>Spring Group Show</em> at Chelsea 27: El Pez, Kokian, Sliks, Sen2, Esther Barend, Kurar, Joyce DiBona and more

You seem to all share a somewhat similar vision. 

Yes, we are interested in showcasing emerging and contemporary artists — who are working in a range of media and styles – from across the globe. We are interested, too, in discovering new talents. Latifa Metheny particularly focuses on the culture of street art and Christine Jeanquier on French artists.

sliks abstract art chelsea27 <em>Spring Group Show</em> at Chelsea 27: El Pez, Kokian, Sliks, Sen2, Esther Barend, Kurar, Joyce DiBona and more

 Why did you choose this particular location?

It is on the ground level of an ideal space in the heart of the Chelsea art district. It was a step I was ready to take, as it is the perfect location for attracting serious collectors.

sen2 azart galllery <em>Spring Group Show</em> at Chelsea 27: El Pez, Kokian, Sliks, Sen2, Esther Barend, Kurar, Joyce DiBona and more

Yes, it does seem perfect! What advice would you offer an emerging artist who would like to see his work featured in a Chelsea gallery?

Before approaching a gallery, get to know its owner and the work that it features. That is how you will know if the gallery is likely to be receptive to your work. Be sure to have a professional-looking website with each image labeled with its size and medium. When visiting a gallery, bring business cards and a cover letter that look professional. Check out — as often as possible — what other artists are doing. Work hard and be persistent! And be sure to have a body of work and a recognizable style before approaching a gallery owner.

Esther Barand <em>Spring Group Show</em> at Chelsea 27: El Pez, Kokian, Sliks, Sen2, Esther Barend, Kurar, Joyce DiBona and more

That certainly sounds like great advice! Is there anything in particular that you, yourself, look for in an artist?

Yes, I look for someone who has a statement to make and is willing to take risks to make it. I develop a personal relationship with each artist whose works I exhibit.

kurar stencil artist artemisa <em>Spring Group Show</em> at Chelsea 27: El Pez, Kokian, Sliks, Sen2, Esther Barend, Kurar, Joyce DiBona and more

So much is happening in the contemporary art scene. How do you keep up with it all?

I follow social media sites like Facebook and Twitter. I regularly read the New York Times, the London Times and the LA Times. I read essential blogs and I talk to people.

Joyce DiBona MZ Urban Art <em>Spring Group Show</em> at Chelsea 27: El Pez, Kokian, Sliks, Sen2, Esther Barend, Kurar, Joyce DiBona and more

We’re looking forward to upcoming exhibits and events, and we are delighted that Chelsea 27 is showcasing so many artists who are active on our streets.

Note:  The exhibit continues through Saturday, March 21.

 Artworks

1. El Pez 

2. Kokian

3. Sliks

4. Sen2

5. Esther Barend, close-up

6. Kurar

7. Joyce DiBona

Interview by Lois Stavsky with City-as-School intern Zachariah Messaoud

Photo credits: 1, 2, 5 & 6 City-as-School intern Zachariah Messaoud; 3 & 7 Lois Stavsky and 4 Dani Reyes Mozeson

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