Graffiti

Featured above — in this second post documenting the range of faces that have surfaced in Athens public spaces — is the work of the noted Greek artist Ino. Several more seen last week follow:

Athens-based Achilles

Unidentified artist(s)

Athens-based Exit

Montreal-based Waxhead

Athens-based Neid

Photos by Lois Stavsky

Note: Hailed in a range of media from WideWalls to the Huffington Post to the New York Times, our Street Art NYC App is now available for Android devices here.

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Teeming with intrigue, the streets of Athen, Greece showcase a range of gritty, authentic artworks. Few surfaces remain untouched! The image pictured above was painted by the prolific Athens-based Achilles. Several more images of faces encountered last week follow:

Also by Achilles

Athens-based Atek

Spanish artist Borondo

Maz

Note: This is the first of several post on Athens street and graffiti.  Special thanks to Vassia of Alternative Athens and to my StreetArtNYC Instagram followers for introducing me to this city’s vibrant street art scene and identifying the many artists whose works grace these streets.

Photos by Lois Stavsky

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Whereas street art makes its way onto a range of public surfaces in Tel Aviv, it is far less prevalent in Jerusalem.  But hidden alleyways and spaces off the main roads, along with Mahane Yehuda — Jerusalem’s marketplace — host a range of intriguing pieces. The image pictured above was fashioned by Haifa native Maayan Fogel. Several more images I recently encountered while wandering the streets of West Jerusalem follow:

The itinerant Jerusalem-based Elna of Brothers of Light   

Brazilian artist Manoel Quiterio

The prolific British-Israeli muralist Solomon Souza

Solomon Souza‘s rendition of  Amar’e Stoudemire — as seen at the Mahane Yehuda Marketplace, as it was closing

Random installation in the art-friendly Nachlaot neighborhood

Photos by Lois Stavsky

Note: Hailed in a range of media from WideWalls to the Huffington Post to the New York Times, our Street Art NYC App is now available for Android devices here.

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Rarely bare, Tel Aviv store shutters largely host a motley range of characters. The shutter featured above was fashioned by Kristopher Kotcher aka Frenemy, a freelance illustrator and street artist from Austin, Texas currently based in Tel Aviv. Several more TA shutters, showcasing a variety of images, follow:

Haifa-based visual artist and graphic designer Erezoo

Tel Aviv-based visual artist Roee Shachar Jakubinsky aka B.T.W Binksy

Be’er Sheva-native, Tel Aviv-based visual artist Wonky Monky

Tel Aviv-born and based illustrator and street artist Dora Suger Minks

Tel Aviv-based illustrator and street artist MitzGZR

Photos by Lois Stavsky

Note: Hailed in a range of media from WideWalls to the Huffington Post to the New York Times, our Street Art NYC App is now available for Android devices here.

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This is the second in a series of occasional posts showcasing the range of faces that surface in Tel Aviv public spaces.  The image pictured above was painted by Tel Aviv based artist Daniel Liss aka Monkey Rmg. Several more that I’ve recently spotted follow:

Shahaf Ram aka Jack TML

Yarin Didi

 Tel Aviv-based Itamar Paloge aka Faluja at the Tel Aviv Central Bus Station 

Tel Aviv-based Ana Kogen at the Tel Aviv Central Bus Station 

Photos by Lois Stavsky

Note: Hailed in a range of media from WideWalls to the Huffington Post to the New York Times, our Street Art NYC App is now available for Android devices here.

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Located just steps away from Israel’s controversial “Separation Wall,”  Banksy‘s Walled Off Hotel claims to offer the “worst view of any hotel in the world.”  That may well be, as the mammoth wall, even when covered with art, remains ugly and a sore reminder of the imbalance of power in the region.  But the hotel’s interior is a visual delight. Splendidly curated, it is also a fascinating foray into the roots of this 100-year, seemingly endless, conflict.

What follows  are several images captured from the hotel’s meticulously maintained lobby — or piano bar :

A variation of Banksy‘s iconic flower thrower

Banksy‘s take on the Biblical verse, “The lion shall lie down with the lamb”

A statue warding off tear gas

The following documentation of the struggle is among the exhibits on view off the lobby

And alongside the hotel, a friendly Wall-Mart, where graffiti supplies, stencils and a motley array of items can be purchased:

Curious as to what local residents think about it all, I spoke to 30-year old Naji, who grew up in a nearby refugee camp. He had the following to say: When Banksy first came here over ten years ago, I welcomed him  Some people here didn’t. They felt any attempt to “beautify” the wall trivializes its impact on our lives. Tourists come and go, but we have to look at it forever. But I, myself, feel grateful to Banksy, because he has brought attention to our cause. When people visit the wall to photograph it, they see how high it is, and they can get a sense of what our lives are like living under martial law. And my advice to the artists who come to paint here is: Get to know us first. You need to connect to us, as we feel disconnected from you. As far as The Walled Off Hotel, I’m of two minds. On one hand, it doesn’t represent my culture. But I like that it attracts visitors from all over the world and and that Banksy continues to employ many Palestinians.

The museum and art gallery are open to non-residents every day from 11am – 7:30pm.

Note: The second floor of The Walled Off Hotel is home to a gorgeous exhibit, curated by Dr.Housni Alkhateeb Shehada. of works in a range of media and styles fashioned by contemporary  Palestinian artists.

Photos by Lois Stavsky

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A huge range of curious characters  — fashioned by both local and international artists — have made their way onto Tel Aviv’s public spaces. The image pictured above was painted by Tel Aviv native Dioz in collaboration with Lior Bentov aka PESH. Several more follow:

Paris-based Swedish artist André Saraiva aka Mr Andre

Roman Kozhokin aka Kot Art

UK native Ame 72

The prolific Tel Aviv-based Adi Sened

Tel Aviv – based Damian Tab

Photos by Lois Stavsky

Note: Hailed in a range of media from WideWalls to the Huffington Post to the New York Times, our Street Art NYC App is now available for Android devices here.

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Representing a huge spectrum of styles, faces seem to surface everywhere on Tel Aviv’s public spaces. The image pictured above is the work of Tel Aviv-based Boaz Sides aka UNTAY. Several more I came upon these past few days follow:

Montreal-based Adida Fallen Angel

The increasingly present Yarin Didi

Daniel Liss aka Monkey Rmg

Tel Aviv-based MUHA Ack

Tel Aviv-based Dioz, close-up from block-long wall

 Israel-based UK native Solomon Souza

Photos by Lois Stavsky

Note: Hailed in a range of media from WideWalls to the Huffington Post to the New York Times, our Street Art NYC App is now available for Android devices here.

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Since its launch in 2008, 17 Frost has emerged as one of NYC’s most intriguing and innovative creative spaces. Warm and welcoming, it is intent in its mission to“provide the best platform possible to showcase the talents of artists worldwide.” And during this past year of extensive renovations, it has continued to host its weekly Family Night, where artists meet to fashion individually and collaboratively a wondrous range of sticker art.

Pictured above are: Love from NYCJason Mamarella aka dwkrsna, Alex Itin, Sara Erenthal and 17 Frost Creative Director Javier Hernandez-Miyares. What follows are several more images captured at 17 Frost’s informal Family Night.

Jason Mamarella aka dwkrsna and Alex Itin

Sara Erenthal and Javier Hernandez-Miyares

Javier Hernandez-Miyares

Love from NYC and  Alex Itinwith Lenny Collado aka BK Lenny checking it all out

Alex Itin and Javier Hernandez-Miyares collaborate

Poster BoyJavier Hernandez-Miyares, Dummy Tree, Arek Jungle, Net, Ninja Status & more

A random finding in the huge space — soon to reopen

Note: 17 Frost is planning a grand reopening exhibition  — curated by Ellis Gallagher — in late February. Information will follow.

Photo credits: 1-5 Lois Stavsky; 6 & 7 Javier Hernandez-Miyares and 8 Lenny Collado 

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My latest adventures with Nic 707‘s famed InstaFame Phantom Art project had me riding the 1 train from the Bronx to the Financial District with several NYC graffiti veterans, along with some newer talents. Pictured above is an image of Salvador Dali fashioned by veteran writer Gear One. Several more images captured on this ride follow:

The legendary Taki 183 in collaboration with Nic 707

Brazilian artist Micheline Gil and Nic 707

Canadian artist Stavro and the renowned Easy

Legendary writers Al Diaz and Taki 183

Bronx graffiti veteran Tony 164

Photos by Lois Stavsky

Note: Hailed in a range of media from WideWalls to the Huffington Post to the New York Times, our Street Art NYC App is now available for Android devices here.

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