Graffiti

The first NYC tagger to go all-city, TAKI 183 has achieved mythical status as the father of modern day graffiti.  We were thrilled to meet up with him last week.

Taki 183 The Legendary TAKI 183 on Tagging, <em>The New York Times</em>, the Wall on 207th Street, InstaFame Phantom Art, Graffiti and more

Your name TAKI is — according to what we’ve read – a traditional Greek nickname for Demetrius, and 183 refers to the street where you lived in Washington Heights. How old were you when you first got your name up? And what was the first surface you hit?

I was about 16. The first surface I remember tagging was the bus terminal on 179th Street and Broadway.

What inspired you to leave your mark in a public space?

My friends Phil T. Greek and Greg 69 had begun writing their names in the neighborhood. They had most likely been inspired by Julio 204, whose tag first surfaced around 1964.

And why did you keep doing it? 

I liked the feeling of getting my name up, and I liked idea of getting away with it. I soon became obsessed. Once I started, I couldn’t stop.

taki 183 nytimes The Legendary TAKI 183 on Tagging, <em>The New York Times</em>, the Wall on 207th Street, InstaFame Phantom Art, Graffiti and more

Did you have any preferred surfaces?

Any flat surface was good. Subways were good. If there was a blank space, I hit it.

Do any early memories that stand out?

One night when I came upon a huge empty space on a wall across from George Washington High School, I decided that instead of using a marker to write my name, I would use a paintbrush with black paint. I wasn’t prepared for the mess that it made. And I remember returning home with black paint all over me.

In the summer of 1971, you were the subject of a significant article in The New York Times. How did you feel about that?

I didn’t understand why they would waste their time on some kid who was tagging. I thought to myself, “For stupid things they put me into The New York Times. Aren’t there more important things going on in the world?”

Jorit street art taki 183 The Legendary TAKI 183 on Tagging, <em>The New York Times</em>, the Wall on 207th Street, InstaFame Phantom Art, Graffiti and more

How did that New York Times piece impact you?

It gave me legendary status. After all, if The New York Times says so, it must be true! Suddenly the media were all interested in not only what I was doing — my greatest hits —  but in the entire culture of tagging and graffiti.

How did your family react to what was going on?

My father said, “Take it easy!”

Have you any thoughts about the direction that graffiti has taken?

I don’t really pay attention to it. If you were born after 1955, I don’t know you! But I do appreciate the graffiti over on 207th Street.

taki183 subway art graffiti The Legendary TAKI 183 on Tagging, <em>The New York Times</em>, the Wall on 207th Street, InstaFame Phantom Art, Graffiti and more

You’ve been riding the trains again in Nic 707‘s Instafame Phantom Art Project.  Can you tell us something about that?

I think it’s great! I like Nic’s vision of taking an old concept and presenting it in a new way.

How do you feel about your status in the graffiti culture?

I feel good about it. I like having a place in history!

Have you any theories as to the world-wide popularity of modern graffiti?

It’s a great outlet for talent and creativity. And getting up in a public space gives you great exposure. Not everyone has the means or know-how to get into a gallery.

taki 183 signs graffiti tag The Legendary TAKI 183 on Tagging, <em>The New York Times</em>, the Wall on 207th Street, InstaFame Phantom Art, Graffiti and more

What advice would you give to the young taggers out there?

Be careful!

Interview conducted and edited by Lois Stavsky.

Photos: 1 & 4 Lois Stavsky; 3 Italian artist Jorit with his portrait of TAKI 183 in the Bronx, courtesy Patrick Styx One; 5 Tara Murray

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For over three decades Bronx native Just One has been making his mark on NYC public and private spaces. We recently had the opportunity to speak to the prolific artist.

Just One graffiti Bushwick NYC Speaking with Bronx Based Just One

When did you first get up? And where?

It was back in 1984 — over 30 years ago — in the West Farms section of the Bronx. I was 14 at the time.

What inspired you to do so?

My older brother and his friends were all doing it. It was the natural thing to do.

Any early memories that stand out?

I was at a handball court in Crotona Park when the spray can I was holding in my hand almost burst into flames.

How did that happen?

It came into contact with a cigarette lighter, and could have easily blown up.

We’re glad it didn’t! We’ve noticed your work in quite a few projects these days – from JMZ Walls in Bushwick, Brooklyn to Operation Skittles at August Martin High School in Jamaica, Queens. Do you prefer legal or illegal surfaces?

I love painting anywhere – but to experience the full essence of graffiti, there is nothing like painting on a surface I discover on my own. Finding a space, being there alone and creating something out of nothing is the ultimate experience.

just one JMZ Walls graffiti NYC Speaking with Bronx Based Just One

Have you ever been arrested for graffiti?

No!

How’s that?

I have good instincts.

What was the riskiest graffiti-related thing you’ve ever done? And why did you do it?

Hitting an elevated abandoned train line, where I had to hop over each wall to do another letter. Why did I do it? I’d been eyeballing that spot for quite awhile and nobody else took it, so I’d figure I’d take my chance. And, yes, it was worth it!

How does your family feel about what you are doing?

My children love it!

What percentage of your day is devoted to your art these days?

About 70%.

Just graffiti three pieces1 Speaking with Bronx Based Just One

What keeps you painting after all these years?

Passion and the adrenalin rush!  It also relieves my stress.

Any thoughts on the graffiti/ street art divide?

I, myself, prefer the movement and flow of graffiti. But art is art. And street art can be beautiful.

How do you feel about the movement of graffiti and street art into galleries? Have you shown your work in galleries?

I don’t have a problem with that. It’s a good thing! I’ve shown at the Jeffrey Leder Gallery in Long Island City and in bars and other alternative spaces around town.

Do you prefer working alone or collaborating with others?

Both.

Is there anyone in particular you would like to collaborate with?

I’d like to paint with Mitch 77, Jamie Hef and Lee Quinones.

just one graffiti street art mural NYC Speaking with Bronx Based Just One

Do you rep any crews?

TMC, TFO, KD, COA and I’m the prez of WF, World Famous Crew.

How you feel about the role of the Internet in this scene?

It can be too much. When it gets too much into your business, it’s bad.

Do you have a formal arts education?

I’m self-taught, but my teachers always encouraged me to draw.

Do you work with a sketch in your hand or do you let it flow?

I freestyle.

Are you generally satisfied with your work?

Most of the time!

Just one graffiti august martin high school nyc Speaking with Bronx Based Just One

How has your work evolved in the past few years?

It’s sharper and neater. And I work much faster.

What do you see as the role of the artist in society?

To inspire others to express themselves.

How do you feel about the photographers in this scene?

The more exposure our works get, the better for us.

What do you see as the future of graffiti? Where is it going?

It will continue to evolve.

And what about you? What’s ahead for you?

I plan to keep painting.  And I want to get back into the canvas scene and hopefully — sometime soon — do a solo show.

Interview by Lois Stavsky with City-As-School intern Diana Davidovaphotos: 1, 3-5 courtesy of Just; 2 & 6 (with Awez) Lois Stavsky

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erin kelli staten island street art <em>Centrefuge Public Art Project</em> in Staten Island with: Erin Kelli, Mr. Prvrt & Col Wallnuts, ScrambledEggsit, Danielle Mastrion, Denton Burrows, ChrisRWK & Kwue Molly

The Centrefuge Public Art Project made its way to Staten Island this past spring, bringing color and intrigue to Wave Street off Bay, a short walk from the ferry. Among the works are these:

Mr. Prvrt and Col Wallnuts

col wallnuts mr pervert street art nyc edited 1 <em>Centrefuge Public Art Project</em> in Staten Island with: Erin Kelli, Mr. Prvrt & Col Wallnuts, ScrambledEggsit, Danielle Mastrion, Denton Burrows, ChrisRWK & Kwue Molly

ScrambledEggsit

scrambledeggsit street art staten island nyc <em>Centrefuge Public Art Project</em> in Staten Island with: Erin Kelli, Mr. Prvrt & Col Wallnuts, ScrambledEggsit, Danielle Mastrion, Denton Burrows, ChrisRWK & Kwue Molly

Danielle Mastrion

Danielle Mastrion Staten Island <em>Centrefuge Public Art Project</em> in Staten Island with: Erin Kelli, Mr. Prvrt & Col Wallnuts, ScrambledEggsit, Danielle Mastrion, Denton Burrows, ChrisRWK & Kwue Molly

Denton Burrows

denton burrows street art staten island nyc <em>Centrefuge Public Art Project</em> in Staten Island with: Erin Kelli, Mr. Prvrt & Col Wallnuts, ScrambledEggsit, Danielle Mastrion, Denton Burrows, ChrisRWK & Kwue Molly

ChrisRWK and Kwue Molly

Chris RWK and Kwue Molly <em>Centrefuge Public Art Project</em> in Staten Island with: Erin Kelli, Mr. Prvrt & Col Wallnuts, ScrambledEggsit, Danielle Mastrion, Denton Burrows, ChrisRWK & Kwue Molly

And great news — especially for us Manhattanites — is that the Centrefuge Public Art Project‘s 17th cycle of murals is currently underway on the trailer at First Street and First Avenue.

First photo is of image by Erin Kelli

Photos: 1, 3-6 Lois Stavsky; 2 Tara Murray

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noir and trans1 graffiti NYC At Manhattans Uptown Open Air Gallery with Trans1, Noir, Ree, Rocky184, Keon1 and T Kid170

Always a showcase for NYC — mostly veteran — writers, the always-rotating walls off the 1 train on 207th Street and 210th Street increasingly host artists from abroad. Here is a sampling of what was sighted this past week:

London-based Trans1

trans1 street art nyc At Manhattans Uptown Open Air Gallery with Trans1, Noir, Ree, Rocky184, Keon1 and T Kid170

London-based Noir

noir graffiti Inwood At Manhattans Uptown Open Air Gallery with Trans1, Noir, Ree, Rocky184, Keon1 and T Kid170

NYC-based veteran writer Ree 

Ree graffiti inwood nyc At Manhattans Uptown Open Air Gallery with Trans1, Noir, Ree, Rocky184, Keon1 and T Kid170

Bronx-based veteran writer Rocky184

rocky184 graffiti inwood nyc At Manhattans Uptown Open Air Gallery with Trans1, Noir, Ree, Rocky184, Keon1 and T Kid170

Veteran writer Keon1, mgs gnd 

Keon1 graffiti Inwood At Manhattans Uptown Open Air Gallery with Trans1, Noir, Ree, Rocky184, Keon1 and T Kid170

Legendary Bronx-native T-Kid

T Kid graffiti street art NYC At Manhattans Uptown Open Air Gallery with Trans1, Noir, Ree, Rocky184, Keon1 and T Kid170

Photos 1-5 and 7 by Lois Stavsky; 6 courtesy of Keon1

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icy sot welling court street art edited 1 The 6th Annual Welling Court Mural Project Launches in Astoria, Queens with: Icy and Sot, Chris Cardinale, LMNOPI, Wane, RRobots, Evan Cairo, Sinned, See One, Queen Andrea and more

Curated by Ad Hoc Art, the Welling Court Mural Project is once again bringing a wonderfully diverse array of public art to Welling Court and its neighboring blocks in Astoria, Queens. Here is a sampling of what’s been happening as artists ready for today’s official launch:

Chris Cardinale

chris cardinale welling court street art The 6th Annual Welling Court Mural Project Launches in Astoria, Queens with: Icy and Sot, Chris Cardinale, LMNOPI, Wane, RRobots, Evan Cairo, Sinned, See One, Queen Andrea and more

LMNOPI

LMNOPI street art welling court1 The 6th Annual Welling Court Mural Project Launches in Astoria, Queens with: Icy and Sot, Chris Cardinale, LMNOPI, Wane, RRobots, Evan Cairo, Sinned, See One, Queen Andrea and more

Wane

wane paints graffiti welling court The 6th Annual Welling Court Mural Project Launches in Astoria, Queens with: Icy and Sot, Chris Cardinale, LMNOPI, Wane, RRobots, Evan Cairo, Sinned, See One, Queen Andrea and more

RRobots and Evan Cairo to his right

RRobot evan cairo The 6th Annual Welling Court Mural Project Launches in Astoria, Queens with: Icy and Sot, Chris Cardinale, LMNOPI, Wane, RRobots, Evan Cairo, Sinned, See One, Queen Andrea and more

Sinned

sinned street art action welling court The 6th Annual Welling Court Mural Project Launches in Astoria, Queens with: Icy and Sot, Chris Cardinale, LMNOPI, Wane, RRobots, Evan Cairo, Sinned, See One, Queen Andrea and more

See One

see one welling court street art The 6th Annual Welling Court Mural Project Launches in Astoria, Queens with: Icy and Sot, Chris Cardinale, LMNOPI, Wane, RRobots, Evan Cairo, Sinned, See One, Queen Andrea and more

Queen Andrea

queen andrea graffiti welling court The 6th Annual Welling Court Mural Project Launches in Astoria, Queens with: Icy and Sot, Chris Cardinale, LMNOPI, Wane, RRobots, Evan Cairo, Sinned, See One, Queen Andrea and more

The 6th Annual Welling Court Mural Project officially opens with a block party today, Saturday, June 13, at 30th Ave & 12th Street from 12-8PM.

Note: First image is of Icy & Sot.

All photos by Tara Murray.

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lady k Fever with graffiti writers <em>No Longer Empty</em> Presents <em>A Timeline of Handstyles: Signatures from the 1960s to Present Day</em> Across from Old Bronx Borough Courthouse

Conceived and curated by Lady K FeverA Timeline of Handstyles: Signatures from the 1960′s to Present Day, presents an extraordinary array of writers’ signatures spanning three generations. While visiting the space — across from the Old Bronx Borough Courthouse – I had the opportunity to speak to Lady K.

I love this! There is so much history here. What prompted you to organize this?

When I first hit the streets, I did so as a tagger. And the first book I ever read on this culture, The Faith of Graffiti, alerted me to the significance of the tag. On a more personal level, this wall is also my way of paying homage to the old school writers who were so supportive of me when I first moved to NYC.

Charmin65 and Swan3 Old School Writers Time line of handstyles <em>No Longer Empty</em> Presents <em>A Timeline of Handstyles: Signatures from the 1960s to Present Day</em> Across from Old Bronx Borough Courthouse

This wall serves as a canvas for early legends, as well as for some of the new artists on the scene. How did you get the word out?

I spoke to a number of writers from different generations, and asked them to invite others.

Stella handstyle <em>No Longer Empty</em> Presents <em>A Timeline of Handstyles: Signatures from the 1960s to Present Day</em> Across from Old Bronx Borough Courthouse

Nicholai Khan handstyle <em>No Longer Empty</em> Presents <em>A Timeline of Handstyles: Signatures from the 1960s to Present Day</em> Across from Old Bronx Borough Courthouse

What were some of the challenges you faced in curating this?

Figuring out the logistics of it all, engaging younger writers, and dealing with the inevitable politics.

Dun one handstyle <em>No Longer Empty</em> Presents <em>A Timeline of Handstyles: Signatures from the 1960s to Present Day</em> Across from Old Bronx Borough Courthouse

Meek hand style <em>No Longer Empty</em> Presents <em>A Timeline of Handstyles: Signatures from the 1960s to Present Day</em> Across from Old Bronx Borough Courthouse

Were there any particular surprises?

Folks rumored to be dead suddenly surfaced! Seeing Swan 3 was, perhaps, the biggest surprise! What a pleasure that was! And I was surprised — and delighted — that so many folks were willing to travel here from afar to tag this wall.

Broham 380 handstyle <em>No Longer Empty</em> Presents <em>A Timeline of Handstyles: Signatures from the 1960s to Present Day</em> Across from Old Bronx Borough Courthouse

What’s next?

I’d love to curate a huge warehouse and engage far more people.

Handstyles complete <em>No Longer Empty</em> Presents <em>A Timeline of Handstyles: Signatures from the 1960s to Present Day</em> Across from Old Bronx Borough Courthouse

Timeline LadyK <em>No Longer Empty</em> Presents <em>A Timeline of Handstyles: Signatures from the 1960s to Present Day</em> Across from Old Bronx Borough Courthouse

The mural will remain on view through the end of this month — with a special public viewing on Sunday, June 28, 1:00 pm – 6:00 pm.

Note: Special thanks to Delicioso Coco Helado for providing the space and supporting the project.

Photos: 1-7 Lois Stavsky; 8 & 9 Lady K Fever

Note: Photo 2 features Charmin 65 and Swan 3; photo 3 Stella Isabella; photo 4 Nicholai Khan; photo 5 Dun One; photo 6 Meek; photo 7 Broham380

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Savior el mundo Frida The Impact Show, <em>El Momento del Impacto</em>, Continues at Williamsburgs <em>Cafe de la Esquina </em>with: Savior Elmundo, Danielle Mastrion, Esteban del Valle, Juan Carlos Pinto, Albertus Alburg, Ben Angotti and more

Highlighting the impact that Mexican civilization has had on other cultures, The Impact Show, El Momento del Impacto, presents a stunning array of artworks that reflect various aspects of the Mexican experience. Here are a few more images that can be seen in the backyard garden of the lovely Cafe de la Esquina in Williamsburg, Brooklyn.

Danielle Mastrion

danielle mastrion frida The Impact Show, <em>El Momento del Impacto</em>, Continues at Williamsburgs <em>Cafe de la Esquina </em>with: Savior Elmundo, Danielle Mastrion, Esteban del Valle, Juan Carlos Pinto, Albertus Alburg, Ben Angotti and more

Esteban del Valle, close-up

esteban del valle art impact show No Se Vende The Impact Show, <em>El Momento del Impacto</em>, Continues at Williamsburgs <em>Cafe de la Esquina </em>with: Savior Elmundo, Danielle Mastrion, Esteban del Valle, Juan Carlos Pinto, Albertus Alburg, Ben Angotti and more

Juan Carlos Pinto

carlos pinto Frida and Diego The Impact Show, <em>El Momento del Impacto</em>, Continues at Williamsburgs <em>Cafe de la Esquina </em>with: Savior Elmundo, Danielle Mastrion, Esteban del Valle, Juan Carlos Pinto, Albertus Alburg, Ben Angotti and more

Albertus Alburg, close-up

albertus alburg art La Soldederas The Impact Show, <em>El Momento del Impacto</em>, Continues at Williamsburgs <em>Cafe de la Esquina </em>with: Savior Elmundo, Danielle Mastrion, Esteban del Valle, Juan Carlos Pinto, Albertus Alburg, Ben Angotti and more

Ben Angotti

Ben Angotti art the impact show The Impact Show, <em>El Momento del Impacto</em>, Continues at Williamsburgs <em>Cafe de la Esquina </em>with: Savior Elmundo, Danielle Mastrion, Esteban del Valle, Juan Carlos Pinto, Albertus Alburg, Ben Angotti and more

Curated by Savior Elmundo and Frankie Velez, the Impact Show remains on view for the next several weeks — with a closing party 7-10pm on Thursday, June 25 — at 225 Wythe Avenue, a short walk from the Bedford stop on the L train.  

Note: First image is a close-up from  Savior Elmundo‘s Frida.

Photos: 1 – 6 Dani Reyes Mozeson and 7 Lois Stavsky

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checker170 graffiti mission Bushwick Veteran Writers on a Graffiti Mission in Bushwick: Checker 170, Styx, Ghetto 149, Keon, Chris 217, Mark 198 and more

Mission Graffiti arrived in Bushwick earlier this month featuring several veteran writers who generally paint in Upper Manhattan and in the Bronx. Here are a few images of their wall in progress:

Styx and Ghetto 149 at work

styx ghetto graffiti NYC Veteran Writers on a Graffiti Mission in Bushwick: Checker 170, Styx, Ghetto 149, Keon, Chris 217, Mark 198 and more

Keon at work

Keon graffiti bushwick nyc Veteran Writers on a Graffiti Mission in Bushwick: Checker 170, Styx, Ghetto 149, Keon, Chris 217, Mark 198 and more

Airbrush and tattoo artist Israel Garcia and his character join the writers

Izzy  Veteran Writers on a Graffiti Mission in Bushwick: Checker 170, Styx, Ghetto 149, Keon, Chris 217, Mark 198 and more

The crew

Mission Graffiti pioneers NYC Veteran Writers on a Graffiti Mission in Bushwick: Checker 170, Styx, Ghetto 149, Keon, Chris 217, Mark 198 and more

And a few of the completed pieces — along with shout-outs to the original Mission Graffiti writers — that we captured this past week:

Checker170 mission graffiti  Veteran Writers on a Graffiti Mission in Bushwick: Checker 170, Styx, Ghetto 149, Keon, Chris 217, Mark 198 and more

Chris 217

Chris217 mission graffiti Bushwick NYC Veteran Writers on a Graffiti Mission in Bushwick: Checker 170, Styx, Ghetto 149, Keon, Chris 217, Mark 198 and more

Mark 198

Mark 198 Veteran Writers on a Graffiti Mission in Bushwick: Checker 170, Styx, Ghetto 149, Keon, Chris 217, Mark 198 and more

Note: First photo features Checker 170 

Photos: 1-5 Dani Reyes Mozeson; 6 Tara Murray; 7 Lois Stavsky and 8. City-As-School intern Diana Davidova

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Subway Entrance Queen Andrea Mural Art Beautifies the 191st Street Subway Tunnel and Entrance with: Queen Andrea, Jessie and Katey, RRobots, Cekis and Cope2

The once drab and dull 900-foot long tunnel connecting Broadway and St. Nicholas Avenue at the 191st Street subway station is now a wondrous canvas featuring bright and bold graffiti and fine art.  While visiting it last week, we had the opportunity to speak to Jessie and Katey, the Baltimore-based duo, who — along with NYC-based artists, Queen Andrea, RRobots, Cekis and Cope2 — were selected to paint murals along the tunnel.

Jessie and Katey artists Mural Art Beautifies the 191st Street Subway Tunnel and Entrance with: Queen Andrea, Jessie and Katey, RRobots, Cekis and Cope2

We love the way you are beautifying this Upper Manhattan tunnel. How did you two first meet? And how did you two — Baltimore-based artists —  become involved in this NYC project?

We met when we were both students at MICA: Maryland Institute College of Art. And about four years ago, we started painting together. We’ve both lived in New York, and when we heard about the Department of Transportation‘s open call for artists who specialize in painting large scale murals, we applied.

Jessie katey abstract art DOT Mural Art Beautifies the 191st Street Subway Tunnel and Entrance with: Queen Andrea, Jessie and Katey, RRobots, Cekis and Cope2

Jessie and katey abstract art mural with passerby DOT Mural Art Beautifies the 191st Street Subway Tunnel and Entrance with: Queen Andrea, Jessie and Katey, RRobots, Cekis and Cope2

What aspect of the project most appealed to you?

We loved the idea of returning to NYC to paint such a huge, awesome space.

Queen Andrea Live Your Dreans DOT NYC Mural Art Beautifies the 191st Street Subway Tunnel and Entrance with: Queen Andrea, Jessie and Katey, RRobots, Cekis and Cope2

R Robot tunnel DOT NYC Mural Art Beautifies the 191st Street Subway Tunnel and Entrance with: Queen Andrea, Jessie and Katey, RRobots, Cekis and Cope2

What was it like working with the other muralists on this project? 

It was great, and getting to know them all was wonderful.

Cekis art DOT with skateboard Mural Art Beautifies the 191st Street Subway Tunnel and Entrance with: Queen Andrea, Jessie and Katey, RRobots, Cekis and Cope2

Cekis art mural DOT Mural Art Beautifies the 191st Street Subway Tunnel and Entrance with: Queen Andrea, Jessie and Katey, RRobots, Cekis and Cope2

What about the Department of Transportation? What was it like working for the DOT?

It was the bomb! They even supported us with potties!

Cope2 graffiti Art Is Life Mural Art Beautifies the 191st Street Subway Tunnel and Entrance with: Queen Andrea, Jessie and Katey, RRobots, Cekis and Cope2

cope2 graffiti tunnel DOT Mural Art Beautifies the 191st Street Subway Tunnel and Entrance with: Queen Andrea, Jessie and Katey, RRobots, Cekis and Cope2

Were there any particular challenges?

At one point the walls cried, and we had to repaint some spots. But — overall — the entire experience was awesome.

 Photos of images:

1. Queen Andrea, Lois Stavsky

2. Jessie and Katey, Lois Stavsky; 3. Dani Reyes Mozeson 4. City-As-School intern Diana Davidova 

5. Queen AndreaDani Reyes Mozeson

6. RRobots, Dani Reyes Mozeson

7. & 8. CekisDani Reyes Mozeson

9. Cope2, Tara Murray; 10. Dani Reyes Mozeson

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MadC graffiti Yonkers NY German Artist Claudia “MadC” Walde on the Streets of Yonkers and in <em>Bits and Pieces</em> at WallWorks NY

A master of form, composition and color, German artist Claudia “MadC” Walde fashions luscious artworks that surface both on public spaces and in galleries world-wide. Her current exhibit Bits and Pieces at WallWorks NY remains on view through June 2.  Here are a few images:

1700Acrylic, watercolor and spray paint on canvas

MadC 1700 2015 wall works NYC German Artist Claudia “MadC” Walde on the Streets of Yonkers and in <em>Bits and Pieces</em> at WallWorks NY

2035Acrylic, watercolor and spray paint on canvas

MadC 2035 2015 Wallworks NY German Artist Claudia “MadC” Walde on the Streets of Yonkers and in <em>Bits and Pieces</em> at WallWorks NY

1126, Acrylic, watercolor and spray paint on canvas

MadC 1126 2015 Wall works NYC German Artist Claudia “MadC” Walde on the Streets of Yonkers and in <em>Bits and Pieces</em> at WallWorks NY

1342Acrylic, watercolor and spray paint on canvas

MadC 1342 wallworks NY German Artist Claudia “MadC” Walde on the Streets of Yonkers and in <em>Bits and Pieces</em> at WallWorks NY

1149, Acrylic, watercolor and spray paint on canvas

MadC 1149 2015 German Artist Claudia “MadC” Walde on the Streets of Yonkers and in <em>Bits and Pieces</em> at WallWorks NY

Wide View

madc wide view wall works German Artist Claudia “MadC” Walde on the Streets of Yonkers and in <em>Bits and Pieces</em> at WallWorks NY

WallWorks NY is located at 39 Bruckner Blvd in the Bronx, just a few minutes away from Manhattan.

Photo credits: 1 Sara C Mozeson; 2, 4, 6 & 7 Tara Murray; 3 Lois Stavsky; 5 City-As-School intern Diana Davidova

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