Deborah Fisher Paul Ramirez Jones <em>No Longer Empty</em> Transforms Former Bronx Borough Courthouse: Deborah Fisher & Paul Ramirez Jonas, Teresa Diehl, Shellyne Rodriguez, David Scanavino, Ellen Harvey, Lady K Fever and more

Almost 40 years ago the historic Old Bronx Courthouse building closed its doors. This past Thursday evening, the landmark structure reopened to host When You Cut Into the Present the Future Leaks Out, a thoroughly engaging multi-media exhibit, curated by Regine Basha for No Longer Empty Featuring over two dozen artists on three levels, its title references the remix suggested by William S. Boroughs. Here are a few more images captured on Thursday:

Teresa DiehlL-Alber-Into, Video and sound installation

Teresa Diehl <em>No Longer Empty</em> Transforms Former Bronx Borough Courthouse: Deborah Fisher & Paul Ramirez Jonas, Teresa Diehl, Shellyne Rodriguez, David Scanavino, Ellen Harvey, Lady K Fever and more

 Another view of  Teresa Diehl‘s ever-transforming hallucinatory musical installation

Diehl <em>No Longer Empty</em> Transforms Former Bronx Borough Courthouse: Deborah Fisher & Paul Ramirez Jonas, Teresa Diehl, Shellyne Rodriguez, David Scanavino, Ellen Harvey, Lady K Fever and more

Shellyne RodriguezPrototype For Belphegor’s Eye, 168 flesh-tint dyed mousetraps, rhinestones, gold chains, copper wire, plywood

Shellyne <em>No Longer Empty</em> Transforms Former Bronx Borough Courthouse: Deborah Fisher & Paul Ramirez Jonas, Teresa Diehl, Shellyne Rodriguez, David Scanavino, Ellen Harvey, Lady K Fever and more

Shellyne RodriguezGeperudeta, Ceramic

Shellyne Rodriguez Geperudeta <em>No Longer Empty</em> Transforms Former Bronx Borough Courthouse: Deborah Fisher & Paul Ramirez Jonas, Teresa Diehl, Shellyne Rodriguez, David Scanavino, Ellen Harvey, Lady K Fever and more

David Scanavino, Untitled, Linoleum tile

David scanvino tile installation <em>No Longer Empty</em> Transforms Former Bronx Borough Courthouse: Deborah Fisher & Paul Ramirez Jonas, Teresa Diehl, Shellyne Rodriguez, David Scanavino, Ellen Harvey, Lady K Fever and more

Ellen HarveyAlien Souvenir Stand (close-up), Oil on aluminum, watercolor on gesso board, propane tanks, plywood, aluminum siding and poles, aluminum diamond plate, magnets

ellen harvey alien souveneir stand <em>No Longer Empty</em> Transforms Former Bronx Borough Courthouse: Deborah Fisher & Paul Ramirez Jonas, Teresa Diehl, Shellyne Rodriguez, David Scanavino, Ellen Harvey, Lady K Fever and more

Lady K FeverAll Rise (close-up), Mylar on façade of  building

Lady K Fever Old Court House <em>No Longer Empty</em> Transforms Former Bronx Borough Courthouse: Deborah Fisher & Paul Ramirez Jonas, Teresa Diehl, Shellyne Rodriguez, David Scanavino, Ellen Harvey, Lady K Fever and more

The exhibit continues through July 19, along with a variety of programs ranging from fashion shows to presentations by such Bronx-based artists as Eric Orr, Per One and Joe Conzo. The old Bronx Courthouse is located at 878 Brook Avenue at East 161 Street and Third Avenue in the South Bronx. 

Note: First photo features Deborah Fisher and Paul Ramirez Jonas, Something for Nothing, Mixed media, Custom designed neon sign

Research for this post by City-As-School student Diana Davidova; photos 1, 5, and 7 Diana Davidova; 2-4, 6 and 8 Lois Stavsky

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roa mural Belgian Artist Roa in Jersey City and at the Jonathan LeVine Gallery

The extraordinarily gifted Belgian artist Roa has recently shared his talents and passion for the animal kingdom with us outdoors in Jersey City and indoors at the Jonathan LeVine Gallery. The following images were captured this past Saturday near the entrance to the Holland Tunnel, not far from Mana Contemporary where Roa created his works for Metazoa, currently on exhibit at Jonathan LeVine:

Close-up

Roa street art Belgian Artist Roa in Jersey City and at the Jonathan LeVine Gallery

Close-up with Roa at work

Roa paints Belgian Artist Roa in Jersey City and at the Jonathan LeVine Gallery

The mural, full view

Roa street art Jersey City mural Belgian Artist Roa in Jersey City and at the Jonathan LeVine Gallery

And here is a sampling of ROA‘s interactive works at Jonathan LeVine, largely created on found, salvaged materials:

Sturnus Vulgaris, mixed-media

Roa Composition ll Jonathan Levine Gallery Belgian Artist Roa in Jersey City and at the Jonathan LeVine GalleryRoa Sturnus Vulgaris Jonathan Levine Belgian Artist Roa in Jersey City and at the Jonathan LeVine Gallery

Composition II: Lutrinate, Salmonidae, Anguilliformes, mixed media

Sturnus Vulgaris, mixed media

Roa Sylvilagus Audubonii Jonathan Levine Belgian Artist Roa in Jersey City and at the Jonathan LeVine Gallery

NY Canidae, mixed media, rear

Roa Metazoa Belgian Artist Roa in Jersey City and at the Jonathan LeVine Gallery

Metazoa continues through May 2 at Jonathan LeVine at the gallery’s 529 West 20th Street space.

Note: For a wonderfully interactive view of several pieces check out this post on Colosaal

Photos of Roa in Jersey City by bytegirl; of Roa’s works at Jonathan LeVine, Dani Reyes Mozeson

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Jamie Martinez Mountain Cat  Jamie Martinezs Triangulism Art in <em>Hunt for Inspiration</em> Continues until April 23 at Chelseas Galerie Protégé

Until April 23 it is still possible to see Jamie Martinez’s distinctly wonderful art at Gallerie Protégé.  Fashioned meticulously and inventively from triangles, Jamie’s works on display range from exquisite oil paintings to tantalizing abstract designs. Here is a sampling of the works from the exhibit, Hunt for Inspiration, curated by Oscar A. Laluyan:

Leopardo, 552 individual oil paintings on wood

Jamie Martinez art Leopardo oil on wood  Jamie Martinezs Triangulism Art in <em>Hunt for Inspiration</em> Continues until April 23 at Chelseas Galerie Protégé

El Lobo, oil on canvas

Jamie Martinez El Lobo oil on canvas  Jamie Martinezs Triangulism Art in <em>Hunt for Inspiration</em> Continues until April 23 at Chelseas Galerie Protégé

Abstract 15, digital c-print

Jamie Martinez abstract  Jamie Martinezs Triangulism Art in <em>Hunt for Inspiration</em> Continues until April 23 at Chelseas Galerie Protégé

Particularly exciting news for us street art aficionados is that several of Jamie Martinez‘s abstract works will be blown up between 6-9 feet for an upcoming public art project, Off the Grid: Innovations in Contemporary Abstraction.  The works will remain on exhibit for a minimum of six months at the site of the West Village Triangle Park at 7th Avenue and 12th Street.

Note:  Gallerie Protégé is located on the lower level of Chelsea Frames at 197 9th Avenue

galerie protege  Jamie Martinezs Triangulism Art in <em>Hunt for Inspiration</em> Continues until April 23 at Chelseas Galerie Protégé

Photo credits: 1, 2, and 5 Dani Reyes Mozeson; 3 Lois Stavsky; 4 courtesy of the artist; the first image pictured is Mountain Cat, oil on canvas; the final image is Medusa, 414 individual oil paintings on wood.

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Boone Room Bronx graffiti Cope2 Celebrating the Launch of the Boone Room Website Tonight at Exit Room

Some of NYC’s most vibrant and striking murals–on Boone Avenue between 172nd and 173rd Streets in the Bronx–were demolished last year to be replaced by residential buildings. But thanks to the efforts of SLO Architecture, various artists, neighboring Fannie Lou Hamer High School, Maria Krajewski, City-As-School students and several others, the spirit of Boone Avenue lives. Featuring dozens of images, interviews and more, the Boone Room website, constructed by City-As-School students, can now be viewed online. To celebrate its launch, the public is invited to join the City-As-School family, several of the artists and a host of performers and musicians tonight at Exit Room.

 Artists interviewed for the Boone Room website include: Cope2, Eric Orr, Marthalecia and Valerie Larko who has preserved the walls in her amazing photorealistic paintings.

Screen Shot 2015 04 14 at 3.59.41 PM.png Celebrating the Launch of the Boone Room Website Tonight at Exit Room

Lady K Fever

Lady K Fever graffiti Bronx NYC Celebrating the Launch of the Boone Room Website Tonight at Exit Room

Kashink — who was visiting NYC from Paris — to the left of Lady K Fever

Kashink Lady K Fever Street Art graffiti Bronx NYC Celebrating the Launch of the Boone Room Website Tonight at Exit Room

 Tonight at 270 Meserole Street in Bushwick

Boone Room Launch Party Celebrating the Launch of the Boone Room Website Tonight at Exit Room

Post by City-As-School intern Zachariah Messaoud with Lois Stavsky; photos 3 and 4 courtesy Maria Krajewski

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Ron English Temper Tot Ron English Brings His Vision to the Legendary Houston & Bowery Wall

Yesterday famed artist Ron English brought his vision to the legendary wall on Bowery and Houston. We are thrilled that this space is once again serving as Downtown Manhattan’s most exhilarating, rotating, outdoor canvas.

The artist and his mural — to be further enhanced — featuring his iconic Temper Tot and his take on the American flag

Ron English street art Bowery Houston Ron English Brings His Vision to the Legendary Houston & Bowery Wall

Ron English‘s wonderfully sardonic commentary on it all

Ron English mural Bowery NYC Ron English Brings His Vision to the Legendary Houston & Bowery Wall

Another close-up

Ron English political commentary Ron English Brings His Vision to the Legendary Houston & Bowery Wall

Note: Ron English continues to work on his mural on Houston and Bowery; he is to begin painting it today, further enhancing his amazing work!

Photos by Dani Reyes Mozeson

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LMNOPI art Brooklyn Is the Future <em>Brooklyn Is the Future</em> to Open This Evening at the Vazquez in Bushwick: N Carlos J, Chris Soria, Eelco, Marc Evan, Savior Elmundo, Ben Angotti, Rob Plater, LMNOPI and many more

Featuring an awesome array of outdoor and indoor murals, along with a range of smaller works in different media, Brooklyn is the Future opens this evening at the Vazquez at 93 Forrest Street in Bushwick. Here is a small sampling of what I saw when I stopped by yesterday.

Brooklyn is the Future curator, N Carlos J at work.

N Carlos J street art NYC1 <em>Brooklyn Is the Future</em> to Open This Evening at the Vazquez in Bushwick: N Carlos J, Chris Soria, Eelco, Marc Evan, Savior Elmundo, Ben Angotti, Rob Plater, LMNOPI and many more

Chris Soria at work 

Chris Soria paints street art nyc <em>Brooklyn Is the Future</em> to Open This Evening at the Vazquez in Bushwick: N Carlos J, Chris Soria, Eelco, Marc Evan, Savior Elmundo, Ben Angotti, Rob Plater, LMNOPI and many more

 Eelco at work

eelco paints <em>Brooklyn Is the Future</em> to Open This Evening at the Vazquez in Bushwick: N Carlos J, Chris Soria, Eelco, Marc Evan, Savior Elmundo, Ben Angotti, Rob Plater, LMNOPI and many more

Marc Evan at work

Marc Evan paints <em>Brooklyn Is the Future</em> to Open This Evening at the Vazquez in Bushwick: N Carlos J, Chris Soria, Eelco, Marc Evan, Savior Elmundo, Ben Angotti, Rob Plater, LMNOPI and many more

Savior Elmundo, close-up

savior el munco art close up <em>Brooklyn Is the Future</em> to Open This Evening at the Vazquez in Bushwick: N Carlos J, Chris Soria, Eelco, Marc Evan, Savior Elmundo, Ben Angotti, Rob Plater, LMNOPI and many more

Ben Angotti, close-up

Ben Angotti painting <em>Brooklyn Is the Future</em> to Open This Evening at the Vazquez in Bushwick: N Carlos J, Chris Soria, Eelco, Marc Evan, Savior Elmundo, Ben Angotti, Rob Plater, LMNOPI and many more

Rob Plater

Plater art <em>Brooklyn Is the Future</em> to Open This Evening at the Vazquez in Bushwick: N Carlos J, Chris Soria, Eelco, Marc Evan, Savior Elmundo, Ben Angotti, Rob Plater, LMNOPI and many more

The two-weekend long exhibit and charity event opens this evening at 6pm.

Brooklyn <em>Brooklyn Is the Future</em> to Open This Evening at the Vazquez in Bushwick: N Carlos J, Chris Soria, Eelco, Marc Evan, Savior Elmundo, Ben Angotti, Rob Plater, LMNOPI and many more

Photos by Lois Stavsky; the first photo features LMNOPI

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In this third in our series of interviews with artists born abroad who have made NYC home, we feature Pesu. Inspired by hip-hop, Pesu began his art career back in Japan in 1996 as a graffiti writer. Here in NYC he is best-known for his live painting in various venues and the many Art Battle competitions he has won. His works on canvas in a multiplicity of styles — from stencil art to abstract art — increasingly attract collectors, as well.

Pesu stencil art einstein PESU: From Fuji, Shizuoka to Manhattan’s East Village

When did you first visit NY? And what brought you here?

In 2001 I left Japan for Sacramento, California on a student visa. But life there was too slow for me. So in 2004, I decided to check out New York City.

What was your impression of it at the time?

I was thoroughly overwhelmed. I remember walking on 5th Avenue and crying – tears of joy! This city has everything: so much energy, art, graffiti, mix of people and amazing architecture. And there is always something happening here.

Pesu black book graffiti PESU: From Fuji, Shizuoka to Manhattan’s East Village

What is the image of NYC in your native country?

Back in Japan we think of NYC as the number one city in the world. It is the place of opportunity.

Do you think this is accurate? Why or why not?

Yes! I agree! Everything is possible here in NYC.

Pesu art face  PESU: From Fuji, Shizuoka to Manhattan’s East Village

When did you decide to move here? And why?

I decided to move here the following year – in 2005. Why? Because I loved it!

How did your family feel about your move?

They were great. Everyone was very supportive. And they were always worried about me when I was doing graffiti back in Japan.

Pesu blackbook graffiti PESU: From Fuji, Shizuoka to Manhattan’s East Village

What were some of the challenges you faced when you first moved here?

I had to find a way to earn money. And I had to worry about having a visa. I also wasn’t used to living in such a competitive city.

You now have a great space in the East Village. Where did you live when you first moved here? And why did you choose that particular neighborhood?

When I first moved here, I lived in Bed-Stuy.  I found the apartment through a broker. I chose Bed-Stuy because I love Biggie so much.

Pesu abstract PESU: From Fuji, Shizuoka to Manhattan’s East Village

Have you encountered any prejudice here?

Yes. I’ve encountered some. Folks here are not all that accustomed to seeing Asians in the hip-hop scene.

How has your artwork evolved or changed since you came here?

I tend to use brighter, more vivid colors. My art is more alive here in NYC! And it’s become more professional.

Pesu and shiro graffiti art PESU: From Fuji, Shizuoka to Manhattan’s East Village

How receptive have New Yorkers been to your artwork? To you?

They seem somewhat surprised by what I do, as they are not used to seeing Asians in this scene!

What would you like to accomplish here?

As an artist, I want to make people happy. And on a more personal level, I would like to bring my parents to America.

Pesu fine art PESU: From Fuji, Shizuoka to Manhattan’s East Village

What do you miss most about your native country?

My parents and the food I ate back in Japan.

Interview by Lois Stavsky with City-as-School intern Zachariah Messaoud; photos 1-4, 6 (collab with Shiro) & 7 by Lois Stavsky; 5 by Zachariah Messaoud; images  2 & 4 are from Pesu’s blackbooks from the late 90′s.

Note: Several of Pesu’s works will be on exhibit in Brooklyn is the Future opening Friday at the Vazquez at 93 Forrest Street in Bushwick.

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This is the twelfth in a series of occasional posts featuring the diverse range of trucks and vans that strike our streets.

Cern

cern art on NYC truck NYC’s Stylish Trucks & Vans – from the Whimsical to the Wild, Part XII: Cern, CashRFC, Keely, Cone, YNN, NME, Frank Ape and more

Cash RFC

Cash rfc graffiti on truck NYC’s Stylish Trucks & Vans – from the Whimsical to the Wild, Part XII: Cern, CashRFC, Keely, Cone, YNN, NME, Frank Ape and more

Keely, Deeker… 

Keely and Deeker art on van NYC NYC’s Stylish Trucks & Vans – from the Whimsical to the Wild, Part XII: Cern, CashRFC, Keely, Cone, YNN, NME, Frank Ape and more

Cone

cone graffiti truck nyc NYC’s Stylish Trucks & Vans – from the Whimsical to the Wild, Part XII: Cern, CashRFC, Keely, Cone, YNN, NME, Frank Ape and more

YNN

ynn graffiti truck nyc NYC’s Stylish Trucks & Vans – from the Whimsical to the Wild, Part XII: Cern, CashRFC, Keely, Cone, YNN, NME, Frank Ape and more

NME

nme art truck nyc  NYC’s Stylish Trucks & Vans – from the Whimsical to the Wild, Part XII: Cern, CashRFC, Keely, Cone, YNN, NME, Frank Ape and more

Frank Ape

frank ape art truck NYC’s Stylish Trucks & Vans – from the Whimsical to the Wild, Part XII: Cern, CashRFC, Keely, Cone, YNN, NME, Frank Ape and more

Photo Credits: 1 Tara Murray; 2, 3, 6 & 7 Dani Reyes Mozeson; 4 Lois Stavsky; 5 Houda Lazrak

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Fusing elements of graffiti, painting, drawing and graphic design, N Carlos J creates masterful, atmospheric works both on and off the streets. He is particularly interested in the unconscious as it reflects our inmost emotions. We recently met up with the Brooklyn-based artist and had the opportunity to speak to him.

N Carlos J Untitled enamel and acrylic on canvas Speaking with Brooklyn Based Artist N Carlos J

You have quite a presence in Bushwick and beyond these days — painting murals, organizing projects and now curating. Can you tell us something about your background?

I attended Art & Design in the 80’s, and I was around graff heads all the time back then. Like just about everyone else there, I got up when I could.

Do any early graffiti-related memories stand out?

The first time I tried to spray my name, I ended up covering my entire hand with Krylon paint. It was impossible for me to wash it off, and I knew I had better before my mother would see it.

I suppose your mom wasn’t too happy about what you were doing!

She wasn’t. She thought I was crazy!

N Carlos J mural Brooklyn Speaking with Brooklyn Based Artist N Carlos J

Did you continue to study art in a formal setting?

Yes. I attended F.I.T., where I earned a Bachelors Degree in Fine Arts.  But soon after, I took a 15-year break from art.

Why was that?

I was married, and I felt pressured to earn money.

But these days you are back into it.

Yes, 100% of my time now is devoted to art.  When I’m not doing my own art, I am organizing projects, working on commissions or teaching art. And I am busy now curating an exhibit to open next Friday.

N Carlos J panel  Speaking with Brooklyn Based Artist N Carlos J

Now that art is playing such a central role in your life, do you feel that your formal art education was worthwhile?

Absolutely. It taught me discipline, and it helped me master technique and color theory.

Any thoughts on the graffiti/ street art divide?

I feel that they must coexist. It is a conversation that we must have.

What do you see as the future of street art?

Street artists are going to continue to treat themselves more like businessmen.

N carlos J Bushwick progress Speaking with Brooklyn Based Artist N Carlos J

N Carlos J at work Speaking with Brooklyn Based Artist N Carlos J

Yes, I can see that happening. But that’s a whole other conversation! How do you feel about the movement of graffiti and street art into galleries?

I love it!

Have you shown in galleries?

I’ve participated in many group shows and I’m working on two solo exhibitions for fall, 2015.

What about the corporate world’s engagement with graffiti and street art? How do you feel about that?

If it pays well enough, I have no problem with it.

N Carlos J street art NYC Speaking with Brooklyn Based Artist N Carlos J

What about the role of the Internet in this scene?

It is a blessing and a curse.  It gives us exposure, and that is, of course, a good thing. But it makes it too easy for others to steal styles and ideas from us.

How would you describe your ideal working environment?

Painting outside on a summer day with hip-hop music blasting.

What inspires you these days?

Listening to music by Kendrick Lamar or CyHi the Prynce inspires me. And reading excerpts from books like A Tale of Two Cities or The House of Rothschild gets me in the right space.

N carlos J shutter street art NYC Speaking with Brooklyn Based Artist N Carlos J

Are there any particular cultures that you feel have influenced your aesthetic?

American pop culture, but Renaissance and post-impressionist painting have also influenced me.

What about artists? Who are some of your favorite artists?

Among those I particularly love are: Borondo, Connor Harrington and Alexis Diaz

Do you work with a sketch in your hand or do you let it flow?

Sometimes I work with a sketch, and sometimes I don’t.

N Carlos J street art Bushwick NYC Speaking with Brooklyn Based Artist N Carlos J

Are you generally satisfied with your work?

No! I am a perfectionist.

How has your work evolved in the past few years?

I tend to more freely fuse figurative and expressionistic elements.

What do you see as the role of the artist in society?

The artist is the keeper of the flame. We are what moves this planet.

Brooklyn is the future exhibit Speaking with Brooklyn Based Artist N Carlos J

What’s ahead?

I’m currently curating, Brooklyn is the Future, a huge, two-weekend long exhibit and charity event to open next Friday, April 17, at the Vazquez at 93 Forrest Street in Bushwick.  Among the three dozen participating artists are: Damien Mitchell, Eelco, Ghost, Li-Hill, Mr. Prvrt, Rocko and Rubin. The artists are asked to envision the future of Brooklyn metaphorically or literally.  I am also curating a show called Good Times Bushwick for Bushwick Open Studios opening on Friday, June 5 at Express Yourself Barista. It will include a gallery show, outdoor murals, along with a day party and a barbecue.

Wow! It sounds great! Good luck with it all!

Interview by Lois Stavsky with Houda Lazrak

Photos: 1 and 3 (close-up of panel for Brooklyn is the Future) courtesy of the artist; 2, 7 & 8 Lois Stavsky; 4 & 5 Dani Reyes Mozeson and 6 Tara Murray

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keith haring close up untitled 1984 <em>Keith Haring: Heaven and Hell</em> at Skarstedt in Chelsea through April 18

Unlike so many of Keith Haring‘s playfully iconic works that exude a child-like innocence, the huge works on exhibit in Heaven and Hell largely suggest an eerie darkness and unfettered eroticism. Here’s a sampling:

Wide view of two untitled works, 1984

keith haring <em>Keith Haring: Heaven and Hell</em> at Skarstedt in Chelsea through April 18

Untitled, 1985

Keith haring Untitled 1985 <em>Keith Haring: Heaven and Hell</em> at Skarstedt in Chelsea through April 18

Untitled, 1984

keith haring untitled artwork 1984 <em>Keith Haring: Heaven and Hell</em> at Skarstedt in Chelsea through April 18

Untitled, 1984

Keith Haring art <em>Keith Haring: Heaven and Hell</em> at Skarstedt in Chelsea through April 18

Heaven and Hell remains on exhibit at Skarstedt at 550 West 21 Street through next Saturday.

Photos of images: 1, 4 and 5 City-as-School intern Zachariah Messaoud; 2 and 3 Dani Reyes Mozeson. Note: First photo is a close-up from the huge mural below it (R).

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