Doze Green abstract painting Doze Green Continues at Jonathan LeVine Gallery through Saturday

A graffiti writer and b-boy back in the 70′s, California-based Doze Green crafts extraordinary artwork that exudes all the energy, exuberance and irreverence of the New York City streets that were once his.  Out of Nowhere, his current exhibit and fifth solo show at Jonathan LeVine, continues through Saturday at 557C West 23rd Street. Here are a few more images:

Set with Osirian Strap (Penis Envy)mixed media on canvas

Doze Green painting Doze Green Continues at Jonathan LeVine Gallery through Saturday

Napoleon Bonefart, mixed media on wood

Doze Gteen artwork Doze Green Continues at Jonathan LeVine Gallery through Saturday

H Thrice, mixed-media on canvas

doze green H Thrice Doze Green Continues at Jonathan LeVine Gallery through Saturday

The Initiate, mixed media on canvas 

Doze Green Abstract art  edited 1 Doze Green Continues at Jonathan LeVine Gallery through Saturday

The Jonathan LeVine Gallery is open from 11am to 6pm.

Photos of images by Dani Reyes Mozeson; first image is Prophet in the Desert, mixed-media on canvas

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Earlier this fall, the Dodworth Street Mural art project began a wondrous transformation of the area on and around Dodworth Street between Bushwick Avenue and Broadway. Here are just a few of the murals that have surfaced:

Eelco ’Virus’ Van den BergRocko and Vera Times

eelco rocko street art Dodworth Mural NYC Dodworth Street Mural Art Project with: Eelco, Rocko & Vera Times, David Louf, Miss Zukie & Lexi Bella, Fumero, Danielle Mastrion, CB23, Col, Marthalicia, BK, Damien Mitchell & Edob LOV3

David Louf 

David Louf dodworth street art Dodworth Street Mural Art Project with: Eelco, Rocko & Vera Times, David Louf, Miss Zukie & Lexi Bella, Fumero, Danielle Mastrion, CB23, Col, Marthalicia, BK, Damien Mitchell & Edob LOV3

Miss Zukie and Lexi Bella

zukie and lexi bella dodworth mural street art nyc 2 Dodworth Street Mural Art Project with: Eelco, Rocko & Vera Times, David Louf, Miss Zukie & Lexi Bella, Fumero, Danielle Mastrion, CB23, Col, Marthalicia, BK, Damien Mitchell & Edob LOV3

Fumero

Fumero street art dodworth Dodworth Street Mural Art Project with: Eelco, Rocko & Vera Times, David Louf, Miss Zukie & Lexi Bella, Fumero, Danielle Mastrion, CB23, Col, Marthalicia, BK, Damien Mitchell & Edob LOV3

Danielle Mastrion and CB23

danielle mastrion and cb street art dodworth mural NYC Dodworth Street Mural Art Project with: Eelco, Rocko & Vera Times, David Louf, Miss Zukie & Lexi Bella, Fumero, Danielle Mastrion, CB23, Col, Marthalicia, BK, Damien Mitchell & Edob LOV3

Col Wallnuts, Marthalicia, BK, Damien Mitchell & Edob LOV3

col mathalicia BK Damien Mitchell dodworth mural street art nyc Dodworth Street Mural Art Project with: Eelco, Rocko & Vera Times, David Louf, Miss Zukie & Lexi Bella, Fumero, Danielle Mastrion, CB23, Col, Marthalicia, BK, Damien Mitchell & Edob LOV3

Photo credits: 1, 3 – 5 Lois Stavsky; 2 & 6 Dani Reyes Mozeson 

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This is the sixth in a series of occasional posts featuring images of children that surface on NYC public spaces:

Jerkface in the East Village

jerkface street art nyc Kids on Walls — Part VI: Jerkface, Axel Void, Billy Mode & Chris Stain, Damien Mitchell, Enzo & Nio, Banksy, Jef Aerosol and Razo & Dead Rat

Axel Void in East Harlem

Axel Void street art East Harlem Kids on Walls — Part VI: Jerkface, Axel Void, Billy Mode & Chris Stain, Damien Mitchell, Enzo & Nio, Banksy, Jef Aerosol and Razo & Dead Rat

Billy Mode and Chris Stain at the Bushwick Collective

billy mode chris stain 2 Kids on Walls — Part VI: Jerkface, Axel Void, Billy Mode & Chris Stain, Damien Mitchell, Enzo & Nio, Banksy, Jef Aerosol and Razo & Dead Rat

Damien Mitchell at the Bushwick Collective

damien mitchell bushwick close up Kids on Walls — Part VI: Jerkface, Axel Void, Billy Mode & Chris Stain, Damien Mitchell, Enzo & Nio, Banksy, Jef Aerosol and Razo & Dead Rat

Enzo and Nio in Williamsburg

enzo nio street art brooklyn nyc Kids on Walls — Part VI: Jerkface, Axel Void, Billy Mode & Chris Stain, Damien Mitchell, Enzo & Nio, Banksy, Jef Aerosol and Razo & Dead Rat

Banksy on the Upper West Side

Banksy stencil art nyc Kids on Walls — Part VI: Jerkface, Axel Void, Billy Mode & Chris Stain, Damien Mitchell, Enzo & Nio, Banksy, Jef Aerosol and Razo & Dead Rat

Jef Aerosol at the Bushwick Collective

jef aerosol street art nushwick collective nyc Kids on Walls — Part VI: Jerkface, Axel Void, Billy Mode & Chris Stain, Damien Mitchell, Enzo & Nio, Banksy, Jef Aerosol and Razo & Dead Rat

Razo and Dead Rat on the Lower East Side

razo street art Kids on Walls — Part VI: Jerkface, Axel Void, Billy Mode & Chris Stain, Damien Mitchell, Enzo & Nio, Banksy, Jef Aerosol and Razo & Dead Rat

Photo 1, 3 – 6 by Dani Reyes Mozeson; 2, 7 & 8 by Lois Stavsky

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chalfant graffiti photography Moving Murals: Henry Chalfant & Martha Cooper’s All City Graffiti Archive through Thursday  with Closing Event Sat. 12/20 at City Lore

Moving Murals: Henry Chalfant & Martha Cooper’s All-City Graffiti Archive, a mosaic of 850 wall images of subway graffiti photographed by Chalfant – along with a series of Martha Cooper’s artist portraits — continues through this Thursday, December 18 at 4pm.  A homage to the boundless creativity of the graffiti artists whose talents and passions paved the way to the global street art movement, Moving Murals is the first exhibit to grace the City Lore Gallery at 56 East 1st Street.

Another close-up from Henry Chalfant collage, featuring the legendary Iz the Wiz

Henry Chalfant subway graffiti City Lore Moving Murals: Henry Chalfant & Martha Cooper’s All City Graffiti Archive through Thursday  with Closing Event Sat. 12/20 at City Lore

Martha Cooper’s portraits

Martha cooper Moving Murals City Lore Moving Murals: Henry Chalfant & Martha Cooper’s All City Graffiti Archive through Thursday  with Closing Event Sat. 12/20 at City Lore

Including such contemporaries as Lady Aiko (top left)

Martha cooper photography city lore nyc1 Moving Murals: Henry Chalfant & Martha Cooper’s All City Graffiti Archive through Thursday  with Closing Event Sat. 12/20 at City Lore

And next Saturday, December 20, 12pm – 6pm, you will have the opportunity to take home one of Henry Chalfant’s graffiti train prints as City Lore will be offering Chalfant’s train photographs from the Moving Murals exhibit with each membership purchased. Membership begins at $35. Hot cider and a variety of gifts by local NYC artists will also be available for sale at the City Lore Store

City Lore Moving Murals: Henry Chalfant & Martha Cooper’s All City Graffiti Archive through Thursday  with Closing Event Sat. 12/20 at City Lore

Moving Murals City Lore Moving Murals: Henry Chalfant & Martha Cooper’s All City Graffiti Archive through Thursday  with Closing Event Sat. 12/20 at City Lore

Final photo courtesy of City Lore; photos of Henry Chalfant’s installation by Lois Stavsky; of Martha Cooper’s by Dani Reyes Mozeson

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Currently based in Brooklyn, New York, Genea Barnes began exhibiting her artful photography in 2005. Her current work has taken her into the streets of over 50 cities where she has photographed hundreds of ghost bikes. 

genea barnes ghost bike child nyc Genea Barnes Takes Us on a Photographic Ghost Bike Journey

When and where did you begin photographing ghost bikes?  

I saw my first ghost bike in Brooklyn in May 2010. It struck me. It felt like someone had punched me in the chest. That was the first ghost bike I photographed. I’ve since traveled to over 50 cities photographing them.

genea barnes ghost bike williamsburg nyc Genea Barnes Takes Us on a Photographic Ghost Bike Journey

Why — do you suppose — you became so committed to this project?

I feel a special connection to these bikes. I am taken by their intense beauty. Their impact was — and still is — tremendous on me. They remind us of lives that were lost and they remind us to keep safe. I knew, at once, that I wanted not only to photograph them, but to share my findings with others.

genea barnes ghost bike and man nyc Genea Barnes Takes Us on a Photographic Ghost Bike Journey

Have you any particular message you would like your photos to convey?

I am frustrated by people’s lack of spatial awareness. A ghost bike represents the most grievous outcome of this. A ghost bike, like much of  street art, is a way to call people out. We must all start paying closer attention to our surroundings.

genea barnes ghost bike and graffiti nyc Genea Barnes Takes Us on a Photographic Ghost Bike Journey

Why a book?

I had always hoped that my art would make a difference…that it would raise awareness. And after my first exhibit of ghost bike images, I knew that it could. Not everyone will attend an exhibit, but anyone can check out a book and, hopefully, be moved by it.  We are so distracted by technology that we often forget to pay attention to our surroundings. And the outcome of that can be fatal.

genea barnes ghost bike nyc Genea Barnes Takes Us on a Photographic Ghost Bike Journey

You can find out more about Genea’s remarkable photography project here and help fund her book at her Kickstarter here.  

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Currently based in Bogota, Colombia, the Australian artist CRISP continues to bring his vision to a range of spaces throughout the globe. We met up with him on his recent visit to NYC.

crisp political street art Speaking with Bogota Based Australian Artist CRISP in NYC

When did you first start painting on public surfaces? And where?

I’m a late bloomer, as back in Australia and during my time in the UK, I was mostly into sculpting and drawing.  But when I moved to Bogota, I became very interested in getting my art out in the street. That was over five years ago now, and I never looked back.

Were there any particular folks who inspired you?

Definitely the Canadian graffiti writer Opek — who was living in Bogota at the time — as he encouraged me to get my art up in the street. Dj Lu / Juegasiempre was an important influence, great support and my favorite stencil artist. Also the local work of Toxicómano , Guache, Kochino, Senil, Vogel, Praxis and others certainly inspired me.

Do you have any preferred surfaces?

The great thing about the urban space is that it’s filled with different textures and surfaces. In terms of my stencils, though, I generally like flat concrete ones, as they’re easier to work with and brighten up an otherwise dull, grey corner of the city.

crisp street art bogota Speaking with Bogota Based Australian Artist CRISP in NYC

Any thoughts on the graffiti/ street art divide?

To me they are one and the same. I try not to get into the politics. Live and let live I say. It’s all expression, creativity and passion.

Have you any thoughts about the corporate world’s engagement with graffiti and street art?

I’ve never liked how corporations have always been able to impose their images on our urban environment while graffiti and street art are almost always deemed illegal. Public spaces are for everybody, not just for companies that want to make sales and money. I feel uneasy how private corporations now use urban art to sell their brand, but I also understand that artists need to earn a living!

How you feel about the role of the Internet in this scene?

It’s changed everything.  So much more artwork is accessible to so many.  It’s not just the people in a particular neighborhood or city who can enjoy the pieces now. It also helps bring awareness to a wider audience of street artists from countries that are less visited or unknown. Bogota has one of the most prolific and best urban art scenes in the world, but not many people know about it or visit.

crisp mask Williamsburg NYC street art Speaking with Bogota Based Australian Artist CRISP in NYC

Do you have a formal arts education?

Not in the formal institutionalized sense, but both my parents are artists, and I grew up around art all my life. My dad is a sculptor, and my mom is a traditional painter. They taught me a lot from a very young age.

How do they feel about what you are doing these days?

They love it. I’ve even turned my mom on to street art! When she came to Bogota, she painted some walls with me!

What’s the riskiest thing you’ve done?

Well, I did get stabbed in the hand during a robbery this year while photographing street art in a dodgy neighborhood in Bogota. I was stupidly doing the wrong thing in the wrong place, and I learnt the hard way! I had to paint with my left hand for a few months while my right hand healed.

Crisp street art stencil portraits Speaking with Bogota Based Australian Artist CRISP in NYC

What inspires you these days to keep getting your art up in public spaces?

I love the idea of sharing my work with a wider audience without the limitations galleries and internal private spaces impose. And I love it when folks discover my work by chance and enjoy it! I want to be a part of a city’s visual landscape – the one I live in and the ones I visit.

What’s your ideal working environment?

Working in areas of cities where my street art will impact passersby by adding something to their commute, walk or day. Every city and street has its own unique aesthetic and feel.

Has your aesthetic been influenced by any particular cultures?

I’m especially influenced by Asian cultures and by different tribal aesthetics from around the world. Also popular culture, current world events and the environment influence my work. My work is a mix of socio-political and solely visual expression.

Crisp street art shutter NYC Speaking with Bogota Based Australian Artist CRISP in NYC

How has your work evolved in the past few years?

I work on larger surfaces, and I’m experimenting more with different materials and subject matters. I’m doing more complex stencils and experimenting with mixing free style with stencils. Also, I’ve started doing more sculptural works in the street through my masks.

Would you rather work alone, or do you prefer to collaborate with others?

Both. It’s always fun to collaborate with other artists, as it can add something new to all our pieces. Among the artists I’ve collaborated with are: Ronzo, Pez, DjLu, Dast, Tarboxx2, Miko and Kochino.

Where else – besides Bogota and NYC – have you gotten up?

I’ve gotten up in London, Mexico City, Miami, Atlanta, Sydney, Alaska, Canada and the Dominican Republic. May favorite place by far, though, is Bogota, Colombia!

crisp political stencil street art Speaking with Bogota Based Australian Artist CRISP in NYC

What do you see as the role of the artist in society?

To visually reflect a particular perspective of the history and culture of the times and place. The artist highlights a people’s social and political values in a way that’s aesthetically expressive and open to different interpretations.

What about the photographers and bloggers? How do you feel about them?

Urban art is continuously evolving, changing and disappearing. It’s important that it’s documented as eventually it won’t exist. And as I mentioned before, it helps people discover and learn about scenes and artists they wouldn’t generally access.

What’s ahead?

I want to keep painting and creating as much as possible. I want my work to keep evolving. I love combining my love of travel with street art, so I will keep mixing that up! My family and my art are the most important things in my life!

Interview by Lois Stavsky; photos 1, 2, 4 & 6 courtesy of the artist; photos 3 and 5 in Williamsburg, Brooklyn by Lois Stavsky 

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Sometimes they last for months; other times for weeks or even just days. But the graffiti that surfaces on Bushwick’s walls, particularly on those streets off the L line, are among NYC’s best.  Here’s a small sampling of what we captured last month:

Denver-based Home

home denver graffiti Bushwick NYC Bushwicks Stylish Graffiti Walls: Home, Owns, Rath, Spot, Yes1, Shiro, Gusto and Vers

Owns

owns bk Bushwicks Stylish Graffiti Walls: Home, Owns, Rath, Spot, Yes1, Shiro, Gusto and Vers

Rath

rath graffiti Bushwick NYC Bushwicks Stylish Graffiti Walls: Home, Owns, Rath, Spot, Yes1, Shiro, Gusto and Vers

Spot KMS captured at work; completed piece here

spot graffiti Bushwick NYC Bushwicks Stylish Graffiti Walls: Home, Owns, Rath, Spot, Yes1, Shiro, Gusto and Vers

Yes1 captured at work, with Shiro to his right

shiro yes1 paints graffiti nyc Bushwicks Stylish Graffiti Walls: Home, Owns, Rath, Spot, Yes1, Shiro, Gusto and Vers

Gusto

gusto graffiti Bushwick NYC Bushwicks Stylish Graffiti Walls: Home, Owns, Rath, Spot, Yes1, Shiro, Gusto and Vers

Vers

vers graffiti Bushwick NYC Bushwicks Stylish Graffiti Walls: Home, Owns, Rath, Spot, Yes1, Shiro, Gusto and Vers

Photos by Dani Reyes Mozeson

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I am Michael Alan Michael Alan on His Recently Released Book, Artistic Freedom and more

Earlier this fall, the wonderfully talented multi-media artist Michael Alan released a book of selected drawings and writings. With the limited edition just about sold out, Michael offers some insights into it all.

Why did you decide to publish this book?

I am tired of artistic control. The government. The police.  Most outlets for publication.  I am also tired of solo shows in New York. Super stress to basically make some dumb money and hear people talk about beer. So came the idea of the book. My work is too intricate for the web. It needs to be in your hand. People need to slow down. That’s what books do. They slow you down. I also wanted my friends and fans who can’t — or don’t want to —  buy a painting to be able to own a handmade affordable piece. The book is a work of art.  And I’ve been sick. In case something happens to me, I don’t want anyone rewriting my mind.

Michael Alan art1 Michael Alan on His Recently Released Book, Artistic Freedom and more

How did you decide what to include? 

Kristen Collins chose the works. She is a lovely, brilliant artist who made this possible. She is passion.

Michael alan artworks book Michael Alan on His Recently Released Book, Artistic Freedom and more

What are your personal favorites and why?

They are all my favorites. My work is about change. Energy. Life. These differ every day. That’s why I work in multiple styles.

michael alan alien Michael Alan on His Recently Released Book, Artistic Freedom and more

How have folks responded to the book?

The response has been great. It’s attracted a range of fans – from as far as Australia. We had only gotten the word out on Facebook and Instagram, and we are almost sold out. This will be the first blog to cover it.

Michael Alan art Michael Alan on His Recently Released Book, Artistic Freedom and more

If you are interested in owning a signed copy of the book, you can contact the artist at artisticrevolution@gmail.com.

All images © Michael Alan 

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Hottea Yarn Bombing street art Hottea on His Recent NYC Installation, Gentrification and UUGGHH

Last month, Minneapolis-based artist Eric Rieger aka Hottea came to NYC with a message. Here’s what he has to say about his installation on the iconic, recently-purchased building on Bowery and Spring Street:

Can you tell us something about this specific site?  What is its significance to you?

This building used to be the old Germania Bank and was built in 1898-99.  Today it is no longer a bank, but a residence.  For such a big building you would think that there is more than one tenant.  Not the case.  There is only one family living there, and that is the family of Jay Maisel.  Unfortunately, this is not for much longer.  He reportedly sold the property for 50 million dollars.  That is quite the profit considering he bought it for around 100k.  Over the years that Jay and his family lived there, they refused to clean its exterior walls.  The outcome was a collage of graffiti, wheatepastes and stickers. This building is significant to me because it made me think of a different way of installing my work.

HotTea spring street Hottea on His Recent NYC Installation, Gentrification and UUGGHH

Why did you choose to install the word “UUGGHH?”

I wanted this piece to be about the recent purchase of the building and the decision to turn it into a condo development/private gallery space.  I have seen gentrification taking place all over the world, and NYC is no stranger to it.  There are so many iconic buildings that are lost due to the desire for “New.”

Hottea street art installation NYC Hottea on His Recent NYC Installation, Gentrification and UUGGHH

What about the process of the installation?  How did you go about it?  How long did it take?

The process was done in three parts.  I did a lot of organizing in my hometown of Minneapolis, such as ordering lumber, reserving a moving truck, etc.  The second part was gathering all the materials once in NYC and building the lettering.  This proved to be much more complicated than I was expecting.  Many of the supplies were hauled via the subway and once on site, there was little room to work.  We used an abandoned lot, but got kicked out so we just worked in front of where I was staying.  Not much room at all.  The third and final part was hauling the letters on site and installing. The whole process from beginning to end took about two weeks.

Hottea street art bowery and spring Hottea on His Recent NYC Installation, Gentrification and UUGGHH

What kinds of responses has your installation received?

A lot of people were curious when I was installing.  They were curious as to what it meant and who it was for.  I think a lot of people assume that if you are wearing a reflective vest and working during the day, that you must be doing something for a brand or for the city.  This installation was done to remember what NYC once used to be.  I was never able to experience it first-hand, but through images and video I was able to sense the energy and spirit behind the work being done. The reactions have been like mine.  UUGGHH, not another building lost to gentrification.  

And for a wonderful documentation of it all, check out this video.

All photos courtesy Hottea

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In its mission to “make the JMZ lines more colorful – one wall, one gate, one space at a time,” JMZ Walls has brought not only color, but intrigue and charm, to Broadway and Myrtle and its immediate vicinity. Here is a  sampling:

Jay Shells

Jay shells street art bushwck JMZ Walls Brings Color and Intrigue to the JMZ Line with Jay Shells, Fumero, Danielle Mastrion, Claw Money, BK Foxx, Zukie and more

@ducklings

ducklings street art bushwick nyc JMZ Walls Brings Color and Intrigue to the JMZ Line with Jay Shells, Fumero, Danielle Mastrion, Claw Money, BK Foxx, Zukie and more

Fumero

fumero street art bushwick NYC JMZ Walls Brings Color and Intrigue to the JMZ Line with Jay Shells, Fumero, Danielle Mastrion, Claw Money, BK Foxx, Zukie and more

Danielle Mastrion‘s homage to Michael Brown, the unarmed black teen shot dead in Ferguson, Missouri

danielle mastrion steet art Bushwick JMZ Walls Brings Color and Intrigue to the JMZ Line with Jay Shells, Fumero, Danielle Mastrion, Claw Money, BK Foxx, Zukie and more

Claw Money

claw money jmz walls street art nyc JMZ Walls Brings Color and Intrigue to the JMZ Line with Jay Shells, Fumero, Danielle Mastrion, Claw Money, BK Foxx, Zukie and more

BK Foxx

bk foxx street art jmz walls JMZ Walls Brings Color and Intrigue to the JMZ Line with Jay Shells, Fumero, Danielle Mastrion, Claw Money, BK Foxx, Zukie and more

Zukie

zukie street art bushwick nyc JMZ Walls Brings Color and Intrigue to the JMZ Line with Jay Shells, Fumero, Danielle Mastrion, Claw Money, BK Foxx, Zukie and more

Photo of Claw Money by Dani Reyes Mozeson; all others by Lois Stavsky

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