Harlem

bayette-ross-smith-Boom-Box

In collaboration with the Marcus Garvey Park Alliance and NYC Parks, FLUX Public Art Projects has brought over three dozen arresting sculptures and installations — all rich with cultural references — to Marcus Garvey Park. Pictured above is Bayeté Ross Smith, Got the Power: Boomboxes.  Here are several more:

Jordan Baker-Caldwell, Golem

Jordan-Baker-Caldwell

Jack Howard Potter, Belvedere Torso

Jack-howard-potter-sculpture

Richard Vivenzio, Untitled

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Suprina, DNA Totem. close-up

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Jason WallaceCrosshairs

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Capucine BourcartTrompe l’oeil

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Bob Clyatt, (E)scape

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Photo credits: 1, 3 & 6 City-as-School intern Sol Raxlen; 2 Lois Stavsky 4, 5, 7 & 8 Tara Murray

Note: Hailed in a range of media from the Huffington Post to the New York Times, our Street Art NYC App is now available for Android devices here.

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A collective of artists based primarily in Harlem, HART has become an active force in the uptown arts scene. While visiting its space, I had the opportunity to speak to one of its founders, Kristy McCarthy aka D Gale.

Can you tell us something about HART’s mission?

Our mission is to use art as a tool to engage, educate and empower the members of our Harlem community.  We are especially interested in beautifying abandoned and neglected spaces.

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When was the Harlem Art Collective first born?  And was anyone – besides you – involved in its conception?

It officially began last February. Gia Gutierrez and I had talked about starting some sort of Harlem-based artist organization. But as she didn’t have enough free time at that point to devote to launching it, Harold Baines and I organized the first few meetings with about 10 other artists and community members.

How did you get the word out?  And how many artists are currently involved?

We initially got the word out mostly via emails and through our personal networks. About 40 artists currently participate.

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Here at HART’s base, you provide space for local artists to live and free studio space for artists to create. In addition, you rent out two of the bedrooms to folks who are in NYC for short periods of time.  How did you come upon such an amazing 5-bedroom space in the heart of East Harlem?

We found out about it from the building’s landlord. And its size and location made it a perfect match for our needs.

Among your projects is the always-engaging Guerilla Gallery on 116th Street off 2nd Avenue. It has introduced us to many new artists, and it also showcases art by some of our all-time favorite ones. What other projects have you initiated? 

We have partnered with other community organizations — such as the East Harlem Block Nursery, Concrete Safaris and the Manatí Community Garden — to paint murals at block parties and community events. We worked with Urban Innovations to paint and install little free libraries in community gardens around Harlem, and we have hosted free art workshops at the HART house.

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How can an artist join your collective?

We hold meetings twice a month. Anyone interested in attending and finding out more about HART can contact us via our Facebook page. We are also going to start a monthly newsletter this spring and, hopefully, add a community calendar to the Guerilla Gallery.

What’s ahead?

We are working on organizing a spring show that will feature artists from the collective and from the neighborhood. We are also working on starting other Guerrilla Galleries on abandoned construction walls around Harlem. And we are planning to paint more murals that directly involve the community. We have, also, recently formed a women’s caucus within the collective to organize projects specifically dedicated to women’s issues and female empowerment.

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That sounds great! Good luck with it all. We are looking forward!

Images:

1. El Nino de las Pinturas, inside the Hart House

2. Lexi Bella, Danielle Mastrion and Kristy McCarthy in East Harlem

3. Kristy McCarthy in East Harlem

4. The Guerrilla Gallery in East Harlem, as seen earlier this year

5. Steve Perez, Zerk Oer and Bio,Tats Cru at the Guerrilla Gallery in East Harlem, as seen this past week on massive wall spelling out E-L  B-A-R-R-I-O

Photo credits: 1 & 4 Tara Murray; 2, 3 & 5 Lois Stavsky

Interview by Lois Stavsky

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iena-cruz audubon-murasl-project-NYC

A collaborative venture between the National Audubon Society and the Gitler & ____ Gallery, the Audubon Mural Project, has brought a series of tantalizing murals of climate-endangered birds to the late John James Audubon’s upper Manhattan neighborhood.

Iena Cruz, Tri-colored Heron, 432 West 163 Street, close-up

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Gaia, Endangered Harlem, 1883 Amsterdam Avenue, close-up

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Gaia, Endangered Harlem, the complete mural

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Hitnis, Fish Crow, 3750 Broadway

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LNY, Swallow-tailed Kite, 575 West 155 Street

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LNY, Swallow-tailed-Kite, close-up

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Mr. Mustart, House Finch, 5 Edward M. Morgan Place

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Keep posted to our Facebook page and this blog for many more Audubon Mural Project images.

Photo credits: 1, 2, 4 & 6 Tara Murray; 3, 5, 7 & 8 Lois Stavsky

Note: This blog will be on vacation through Nov 28th. You can follow us on Facebook and Instagram.

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While visiting the Free Radicals graffiti exhibit at ALL CITY this past Friday, I had the opportunity to speak to noted Martinez Gallery director Hugo Martinez who — together with Dr. Juan Tapia — envisioned and helped realize this wonderful space that serves as a graffiti art gallery, arts center and pediatric clinic.

What an amazing venture this is! A pediatric clinic, a dynamic art gallery and lounge all sharing the same space. Whose concept was this?

It was Einstein’s. “After a certain high level of technical skill is achieved, science and art tend to coalesce in esthetics, plasticity and form,” he once stated. There is a natural synthesis between art and medicine, and a health clinic is an ideal setting to realize it.

Noxer

What made this extraordinary space possible?

2.5 million dollars and seven years.

Who were the main forces behind it?

I work with Dr. Juan Tapia, a pediatrician and former graffiti artist known as C.A.T. 87.  We were inspired to observe and measure evidence-based results of fusing two seemingly antithetical concepts.

"Navy8 and False"

How did you two come to collaborate?

I met Juan over 40 years ago when I was a student at City College and he was a Warlord for the neighborhood division of the Young Savage Nomads gang.  In 1972, we co-founded the United Graffiti Artists (UGA) as an alternative community to the established art world. Juan then went on to earn his GED and attend college and medical school. We have since collaborated on many community-based art and health projects. And in 2008, we established the ALL CITY Foundation.

Can you tell us something about the ALL CITY Foundation?

It is a community-based health and arts collaborative that has brought together a network of medical practitioners, artists and designers to create and run coordinated health and art programs for youth in New York City.

Navy8

Your current exhibit, Free Radicals, is a remarkable representation of various works in different media by a range of prolific artists.

Yes. All of the artists in this exhibit have established all-city reputations, most in NYC and a few in other large cities.

Why did you choose this particular space on the corner of 135th Street and Broadway? It is quite impressive.

It is close to City College, where UGA was first established. And the lay-out of the building, the former Claremont Theater – a 22,500-square-foot landmark that was the first theater to show photoplays — is perfectly designed for our purposes.

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What’s ahead?

A range of programs, activities and revolving art exhibits.

Note: Free Radicals continues through March 31 at 3332 Broadway at 135th Street in Harlem. All artworks are for sale. You can follow the Martinez Gallery online at martinezgallery.com and on Instagram at instagram.com/martinezgallery. You can also visit the space with NY1 and check out this recent story in the New York Times.

Photos

1. Kaput, Noxer and Giz

2Noxer

3. False and Navy8

4. Navy8

5. Soviet, close-up

6. Various artists, as seen from the outside looking inside

Interview and photos by Lois Stavsky

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La Maison d’Art, a lovely guesthouse on West 132 Street in Harlem, is also home to some intriguing art.  On exhibit in its indoor gallery through August 28 is “GETTING UP!” — the Evolution of Graffiti. Here is a small sampling of what is on display:

The legendary T-Kid, Back in Da Day, Acrylic spray on canvas

T-Kid

 King Trio, Acrylic spray on canvas 

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MRS — whose works we’ve seen on the streets of the Bronx –Contact High, Acrylic and mixed media on canvas

Mrs

French artist Oeno, Mechanical Child  Stencil, spray paint,  pencil, markers on canvas

Oeno

Harlem-based Royce Bannon aka Choice Royce, Everyday Hustle, Acrylic on oak (top left); Alone by Myself, and Ride or Die, Acrylic and spray paint on wood

"Choice Royce"

And in the garden is a huge array of works in different media forged with found objects by the masterful Linus Coraggio.

"Linus Corragio"

Close-up from huge mixed-media installation

"Linus Corragio"

Also on exhibit in the gallery are works by Paul Deo,  Mathametics Patterson, Flygirrl and Ausm.  La Maison d’Art is located at 259 W 132 Street in Harlem.

Photos by Dani Reyes Mozeson  

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Presented by No Longer Empty in partnership with Broadway Housing Communities, If You Build It features a range of artwork in different media by more than twenty local, national, and international artists. Located at 155th Street and St. Nicholas Avenue in Sugar Hill on a site designed by architect David Adjaye, the exhibit — along with an impressive array of events and programs — continues through August 10. Here is a sampling of the artworks that can be seen on the site’s grounds and in future apartments:

Rául Ayala, A Blaze of Glory

"Raul Ayala"

Moses Ros-Suárezseated on sculpture he fashioned — one of four structural models of bridges

"Moses Ros"

Carlos Mare aka Mare1398th FreeStyle Archityper

Mare

 Radcliffe Bailey, From the Cabinet: Fire Music — fashioned with recycled piano keys

"Radcliffe Bailey"

Scherezade GarcíaCathedral/Catedral, made up of stacked inner tubes/life savers ‘dipped’ in gold paint “so as to resemble a temporary alter or monument to immigrants and their aspirations”

"Scherezade Garcia"

Brendan Jamison and Mark Revels, Sugar Metropolis — composed with half a million sugar cubes

"Brendan Jamison" "Mark Revels"

The exhibit is open Thursday–Friday 3–7pm & Saturday–Sunday 1–6pm & Wednesday by appointment. 

Photo of Rául Ayala by Lois Stavsky; all others by Dani Reyes Mozeson

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For over 30 years East Harlem’s Graffiti Hall of Fame has been home to hundreds of stylish masterpieces.  This past weekend, generations of fans and writers came together — once again — at 106th and Park to celebrate the extraordinary art movement that began here and continues to impact the world. Here is a selection of images captured at the event:

1983 Wild Style mural by Zephyr, Revolt and Sharp recreated by KingBee and Vase1

Wild Style

Hef and Per1

Hef and Per1

Rain and Demer

rain and demur

Muse, Wallnuts

Muse

Kais

Kais

The Cone

The Cones

Craze, Reo, Page3 and Eazy

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Nic 707 and Tony 164

Nic 707 and Tony 164

One of many talented break dancers

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In front of the main mural celebrating the 30th anniversary of the film Wild Style

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Final photo courtesy of Scott Richardson; other photos by Dani Mozeson, Tara Murray and Lois Stavsky

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A diverse range of work from dozens of artists is currently on view at Heath, a gem of a gallery housed in a landmark townhouse at 24 West 120th Street in Harlem. Among the artworks — all 6 inches by 6 inches — are many by artists who also share their works in public spaces. Here is a sampling:

Harlem-based artist and curator Royce Bannon — whose iconic monsters can be found just about everywhere in NYC

Royce Bannon aka Choice Royce

NYC-based TMNK who maintains an active presence both on NYC streets and galleries world-wide

TMNK aka Nobody

Lower East Side-based graphic designer and painter BlusterOne 

BlusterOne

One of Jenevieve’s intriguing urban landscapes

Jenevieve Reid

And another cityscape — this one by the prolific Joseph Meloy 

Joseph Meloy

Curated by Mike McManus, the exhibit continues through May 10.

Photos by Lois Stavsky

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