Walls

Ron English Temper Tot Ron English Brings His Vision to the Legendary Houston & Bowery Wall

Yesterday famed artist Ron English brought his vision to the legendary wall on Bowery and Houston. We are thrilled that this space is once again serving as Downtown Manhattan’s most exhilarating, rotating, outdoor canvas.

The artist and his mural — to be further enhanced — featuring his iconic Temper Tot and his take on the American flag

Ron English street art Bowery Houston Ron English Brings His Vision to the Legendary Houston & Bowery Wall

Ron English‘s wonderfully sardonic commentary on it all

Ron English mural Bowery NYC Ron English Brings His Vision to the Legendary Houston & Bowery Wall

Another close-up

Ron English political commentary Ron English Brings His Vision to the Legendary Houston & Bowery Wall

Note: Ron English continues to work on his mural on Houston and Bowery; he is to begin painting it today, further enhancing his amazing work!

Photos by Dani Reyes Mozeson

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LMNOPI art Brooklyn Is the Future <em>Brooklyn Is the Future</em> to Open This Evening at the Vazquez in Bushwick: N Carlos J, Chris Soria, Eelco, Marc Evan, Savior Elmundo, Ben Angotti, Rob Plater, LMNOPI and many more

Featuring an awesome array of outdoor and indoor murals, along with a range of smaller works in different media, Brooklyn is the Future opens this evening at the Vazquez at 93 Forrest Street in Bushwick. Here is a small sampling of what I saw when I stopped by yesterday.

Brooklyn is the Future curator, N Carlos J at work.

N Carlos J street art NYC1 <em>Brooklyn Is the Future</em> to Open This Evening at the Vazquez in Bushwick: N Carlos J, Chris Soria, Eelco, Marc Evan, Savior Elmundo, Ben Angotti, Rob Plater, LMNOPI and many more

Chris Soria at work 

Chris Soria paints street art nyc <em>Brooklyn Is the Future</em> to Open This Evening at the Vazquez in Bushwick: N Carlos J, Chris Soria, Eelco, Marc Evan, Savior Elmundo, Ben Angotti, Rob Plater, LMNOPI and many more

 Eelco at work

eelco paints <em>Brooklyn Is the Future</em> to Open This Evening at the Vazquez in Bushwick: N Carlos J, Chris Soria, Eelco, Marc Evan, Savior Elmundo, Ben Angotti, Rob Plater, LMNOPI and many more

Marc Evan at work

Marc Evan paints <em>Brooklyn Is the Future</em> to Open This Evening at the Vazquez in Bushwick: N Carlos J, Chris Soria, Eelco, Marc Evan, Savior Elmundo, Ben Angotti, Rob Plater, LMNOPI and many more

Savior Elmundo, close-up

savior el munco art close up <em>Brooklyn Is the Future</em> to Open This Evening at the Vazquez in Bushwick: N Carlos J, Chris Soria, Eelco, Marc Evan, Savior Elmundo, Ben Angotti, Rob Plater, LMNOPI and many more

Ben Angotti, close-up

Ben Angotti painting <em>Brooklyn Is the Future</em> to Open This Evening at the Vazquez in Bushwick: N Carlos J, Chris Soria, Eelco, Marc Evan, Savior Elmundo, Ben Angotti, Rob Plater, LMNOPI and many more

Rob Plater

Plater art <em>Brooklyn Is the Future</em> to Open This Evening at the Vazquez in Bushwick: N Carlos J, Chris Soria, Eelco, Marc Evan, Savior Elmundo, Ben Angotti, Rob Plater, LMNOPI and many more

The two-weekend long exhibit and charity event opens this evening at 6pm.

Brooklyn <em>Brooklyn Is the Future</em> to Open This Evening at the Vazquez in Bushwick: N Carlos J, Chris Soria, Eelco, Marc Evan, Savior Elmundo, Ben Angotti, Rob Plater, LMNOPI and many more

Photos by Lois Stavsky; the first photo features LMNOPI

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Fusing elements of graffiti, painting, drawing and graphic design, N Carlos J creates masterful, atmospheric works both on and off the streets. He is particularly interested in the unconscious as it reflects our inmost emotions. We recently met up with the Brooklyn-based artist and had the opportunity to speak to him.

N Carlos J Untitled enamel and acrylic on canvas Speaking with Brooklyn Based Artist N Carlos J

You have quite a presence in Bushwick and beyond these days — painting murals, organizing projects and now curating. Can you tell us something about your background?

I attended Art & Design in the 80’s, and I was around graff heads all the time back then. Like just about everyone else there, I got up when I could.

Do any early graffiti-related memories stand out?

The first time I tried to spray my name, I ended up covering my entire hand with Krylon paint. It was impossible for me to wash it off, and I knew I had better before my mother would see it.

I suppose your mom wasn’t too happy about what you were doing!

She wasn’t. She thought I was crazy!

N Carlos J mural Brooklyn Speaking with Brooklyn Based Artist N Carlos J

Did you continue to study art in a formal setting?

Yes. I attended F.I.T., where I earned a Bachelors Degree in Fine Arts.  But soon after, I took a 15-year break from art.

Why was that?

I was married, and I felt pressured to earn money.

But these days you are back into it.

Yes, 100% of my time now is devoted to art.  When I’m not doing my own art, I am organizing projects, working on commissions or teaching art. And I am busy now curating an exhibit to open next Friday.

N Carlos J panel  Speaking with Brooklyn Based Artist N Carlos J

Now that art is playing such a central role in your life, do you feel that your formal art education was worthwhile?

Absolutely. It taught me discipline, and it helped me master technique and color theory.

Any thoughts on the graffiti/ street art divide?

I feel that they must coexist. It is a conversation that we must have.

What do you see as the future of street art?

Street artists are going to continue to treat themselves more like businessmen.

N carlos J Bushwick progress Speaking with Brooklyn Based Artist N Carlos J

N Carlos J at work Speaking with Brooklyn Based Artist N Carlos J

Yes, I can see that happening. But that’s a whole other conversation! How do you feel about the movement of graffiti and street art into galleries?

I love it!

Have you shown in galleries?

I’ve participated in many group shows and I’m working on two solo exhibitions for fall, 2015.

What about the corporate world’s engagement with graffiti and street art? How do you feel about that?

If it pays well enough, I have no problem with it.

N Carlos J street art NYC Speaking with Brooklyn Based Artist N Carlos J

What about the role of the Internet in this scene?

It is a blessing and a curse.  It gives us exposure, and that is, of course, a good thing. But it makes it too easy for others to steal styles and ideas from us.

How would you describe your ideal working environment?

Painting outside on a summer day with hip-hop music blasting.

What inspires you these days?

Listening to music by Kendrick Lamar or CyHi the Prynce inspires me. And reading excerpts from books like A Tale of Two Cities or The House of Rothschild gets me in the right space.

N carlos J shutter street art NYC Speaking with Brooklyn Based Artist N Carlos J

Are there any particular cultures that you feel have influenced your aesthetic?

American pop culture, but Renaissance and post-impressionist painting have also influenced me.

What about artists? Who are some of your favorite artists?

Among those I particularly love are: Borondo, Connor Harrington and Alexis Diaz

Do you work with a sketch in your hand or do you let it flow?

Sometimes I work with a sketch, and sometimes I don’t.

N Carlos J street art Bushwick NYC Speaking with Brooklyn Based Artist N Carlos J

Are you generally satisfied with your work?

No! I am a perfectionist.

How has your work evolved in the past few years?

I tend to more freely fuse figurative and expressionistic elements.

What do you see as the role of the artist in society?

The artist is the keeper of the flame. We are what moves this planet.

Brooklyn is the future exhibit Speaking with Brooklyn Based Artist N Carlos J

What’s ahead?

I’m currently curating, Brooklyn is the Future, a huge, two-weekend long exhibit and charity event to open next Friday, April 17, at the Vazquez at 93 Forrest Street in Bushwick.  Among the three dozen participating artists are: Damien Mitchell, Eelco, Ghost, Li-Hill, Mr. Prvrt, Rocko and Rubin. The artists are asked to envision the future of Brooklyn metaphorically or literally.  I am also curating a show called Good Times Bushwick for Bushwick Open Studios opening on Friday, June 5 at Express Yourself Barista. It will include a gallery show, outdoor murals, along with a day party and a barbecue.

Wow! It sounds great! Good luck with it all!

Interview by Lois Stavsky with Houda Lazrak

Photos: 1 and 3 (close-up of panel for Brooklyn is the Future) courtesy of the artist; 2, 7 & 8 Lois Stavsky; 4 & 5 Dani Reyes Mozeson and 6 Tara Murray

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In an eclectic range of visual styles and themes, music makes it way to NYC walls. Here  is a small sampling:

Zeso, close-up from huge mural in Bushwick

zeso close up Silent Music on NYC Streets: Zeso, Andre Trenier, Kingbee, Pose2, Chemis, Meres, Slone, See TF, Shiro, Manny Vega, Sonni and more

Andre Trenier, lead artist, in the Bronx

andre collaborative Silent Music on NYC Streets: Zeso, Andre Trenier, Kingbee, Pose2, Chemis, Meres, Slone, See TF, Shiro, Manny Vega, Sonni and more

 Kingbee, Pose2 and Chemis in East Harlem

kingbee pose2 chemis harlem street art Silent Music on NYC Streets: Zeso, Andre Trenier, Kingbee, Pose2, Chemis, Meres, Slone, See TF, Shiro, Manny Vega, Sonni and more

MeresSloneSee TFShiroIZK and more in Bushwick

hip hop street art bk Silent Music on NYC Streets: Zeso, Andre Trenier, Kingbee, Pose2, Chemis, Meres, Slone, See TF, Shiro, Manny Vega, Sonni and more

Close-up

meres and slone street art nyc Silent Music on NYC Streets: Zeso, Andre Trenier, Kingbee, Pose2, Chemis, Meres, Slone, See TF, Shiro, Manny Vega, Sonni and more

Manny Vega in East Harlem

Manny Vega street art portraits NYC Silent Music on NYC Streets: Zeso, Andre Trenier, Kingbee, Pose2, Chemis, Meres, Slone, See TF, Shiro, Manny Vega, Sonni and more

Sonni in Bushwick

Sonni street art NYC  Silent Music on NYC Streets: Zeso, Andre Trenier, Kingbee, Pose2, Chemis, Meres, Slone, See TF, Shiro, Manny Vega, Sonni and more

Mike Brown on the Lower East Side

Mike Brown street art nyc Silent Music on NYC Streets: Zeso, Andre Trenier, Kingbee, Pose2, Chemis, Meres, Slone, See TF, Shiro, Manny Vega, Sonni and more

Unidentified artist in Bedford-Stuyvesant

unidentified bed stuy nyc Silent Music on NYC Streets: Zeso, Andre Trenier, Kingbee, Pose2, Chemis, Meres, Slone, See TF, Shiro, Manny Vega, Sonni and more

Photo credits: 1, 2, 5 – 9 Lois Stavsky; 3 Dani Reyes Mozeson; 4 Tara Murray

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Argentine artist Magdalena Marcenaro aka Magda Love shares with us some of her early experiences and impressions of NYC in this second in our series of interviews with artists born abroad who have made NYC home.

Magda Love street art Brooklyn NYC Magda Love: From Buenos Aires to Brooklyn

When did you first visit New York City?

I first came here in 2000 with a bag and $300. My uncle had paid for my ticket.

What was your initial impression of this city?

I wasn’t impressed! I was raised in Buenos Aires, a similarly large city. And large cities don’t move me that much. I’m far more impressed by nature.  And I always thought of Europe as far cooler than the United States, as Europeans seem to value culture more than Americans do. London seemed like the ideal place to live because I was into fashion at the time.

Magda Love street art NYC close up Magda Love: From Buenos Aires to Brooklyn

Why, then, did you decide to stay in NYC?

Just about everyone was telling me that NYC is the place to be, and then four months later, I was married.

How did your family feel about your move?

My mother was very supportive. She raised me to be independent. She, herself, is very adventurous.

Magda Love art exhibit Magda Love: From Buenos Aires to Brooklyn

What were some of the challenges you faced when you first came here –before you were married?

My biggest challenge was finding a place to live.  When I first arrived, I called a friend I’d met in Argentina and I spent my first two weeks in her place on Roosevelt Island. There was a huge snowstorm at the time. I can’t forget that! I had never seen snow in Buenos Aires. I then worked in a hostel on 106th Street and Central Park West in exchange for a place to sleep. After that, I just crashed in lots of different spaces, wherever anyone had a spare bed.

That must have been difficult.

Yes, I remember spending an entire night on a computer in Times Square checking for possible rentals.  For a while I ended up renting a room in Alphabet City. It was in the Projects on Avenue D. I didn’t even know what the Projects were. And there I was — walking around in a fur coat! And as my Spanish is so different from that of the people living in the Projects, I could barely communicate with anyone. And, of course, dealing with paper work that any newcomer to the US has to deal with is always a challenge.

magda love art at welling court Magda Love: From Buenos Aires to Brooklyn

How did you meet your basic expenses early on?

I first worked in a coffee shop, and then I worked as a bartender. I also sold some clothes I’d made to Patricia Field. Back in Buenos Aires, I designed fashion.

Have you encountered any prejudice here?

Not here in NYC. Living in this city is like living in a bubble. But when I’m with my son  – who is biracial – outside of NYC, I do feel prejudice.

Magda Love Cobble Hill street art NYC Magda Love: From Buenos Aires to Brooklyn

How has your artwork evolved or changed since you moved here?

It changes all the time. I feel that I’ve grown tremendously. Being around so many talented artists – especially those who paint on the streets  – exposed me to so much. It has helped me develop different techniques.

Have New Yorkers been receptive to your artwork?

Yes. I’ve been fortunate.

Magda love close up collate at Nu Hotel NYC Magda Love: From Buenos Aires to Brooklyn

What would you like to accomplish here?

I’m eager to paint a huge wall. I want to collaborate with some of my favorite artists. And I’d love to have a solo show. Actually, my goal is to conquer the world!

What do you miss most about your native country?

I miss seeing my brother’s kids grow up and I miss the countryside.

Magda sneaker art Magda Love: From Buenos Aires to Brooklyn

Do you see yourself living here on a permanent basis or returning to your country?

I’m here to stay!

Interview conducted by Lois Stavsky and City-as-School intern Zachariah Messaoud; photo credits: 1, 2, 5 & 7 Zachariah Messaoud; 3 Dani Reyes Mozeson; 4 Tara Murray & 6 Lois Stavsky

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This is the ninth in a series of occasional posts featuring the range of faces that surface on NYC open spaces:

James Bullough at the Bushwick Collective

James Bullough street art Bushwick Collective NYC Faces in NYC Public Spaces, Part IX: James Bullough, Alan Aine, Vexta, Zimad, Anser, Sam Kirk and Rafael de los Santos

Alan Aine in Bedford-Stuyvesant

alan aine street art bed stuy Faces in NYC Public Spaces, Part IX: James Bullough, Alan Aine, Vexta, Zimad, Anser, Sam Kirk and Rafael de los Santos

Vexta in the East Village

vexta east village street art nyc Faces in NYC Public Spaces, Part IX: James Bullough, Alan Aine, Vexta, Zimad, Anser, Sam Kirk and Rafael de los Santos

Zimad at the Bushwick Collective

zimad street art nyc Faces in NYC Public Spaces, Part IX: James Bullough, Alan Aine, Vexta, Zimad, Anser, Sam Kirk and Rafael de los Santos

Anser in Bushwick

anser street art bushwick nyc Faces in NYC Public Spaces, Part IX: James Bullough, Alan Aine, Vexta, Zimad, Anser, Sam Kirk and Rafael de los Santos

Sam Kirk in Williamsburg

provoke culture street art nyc Faces in NYC Public Spaces, Part IX: James Bullough, Alan Aine, Vexta, Zimad, Anser, Sam Kirk and Rafael de los Santos

Rafael de los Santos aka Poteleche in Williamsburg

HD Crew Street art nyc Faces in NYC Public Spaces, Part IX: James Bullough, Alan Aine, Vexta, Zimad, Anser, Sam Kirk and Rafael de los Santos

Photo credits: 1 & 3. Tara Murray; 2, 4, 6 & 7 Lois Stavsky; 5. Dani Reyes Mozeson

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Speaking with Mor

March 26, 2015

For the past several years, Mor‘s exquisitely-fashioned stencils have been surfacing on the streets of NYC and beyond. I had the opportunity to speak to Mor earlier this week at Con Artist, where she was preparing for tomorrow’s opening at City Bird Gallery.

Mor with stencil con artist Speaking with Mor

When did you first get up on the streets? What was your medium at the time?

I started almost five years ago with hand-made stickers. And the following year, I pasted up my first one-layer stencil – a face looking upward — in Williamsburg.

What inspired you to work with stencils?

When I was in middle school, I was living in Bushwick — in its early stages of gentrification. I remember passing Swoon’s work on my way to school. Its beauty astounded me. She is my greatest inspiration. And C215’s amazing work – that surfaced in Brooklyn back then — also moved me to experiment with stencils.

What about the streets? What was the appeal of the streets to you?

I love the notion of creating something beautiful and just giving it to others.

mor stencil art Lower East Side NYC Speaking with Mor

Were you ever arrested back then?

I was once caught tagging with a black marker, and I ended up spending the night in jail. It is a risk that all street artists take.

How did your family feel about what you were doing?

They were positive, encouraging me to do what makes me happy

Do you have a formal arts education?

I am, for the most part, self-taught.  But my art teachers always encouraged me.

Mor street art nyc Speaking with Mor

Any thoughts on the graffiti street art divide?

There definitely is a divide, and there will always be some kind of beef between graffiti writers and street artists. It’s not cool when a street artist goes over graffiti. Nor is it cool when a writer tags over street art.  But I think the media – particularly the Internet – is partly responsible for the beef.

How do you feel about the role of the Internet in this scene?

It has definitely changed the playing field!  It’s great that it gives permanence to a transient art form. But — on the negative side — it boosts a type of showmanship, while giving exposure to mediocre artwork.

What inspires you these days?

Much of my inspiration comes from my dreams. I’m also into mysticism.

Mor stencil street art in Bushwick NYC Speaking with Mor

Are there any particular cultures that have influenced your aesthetic?

Tribal ones have the most influence.

Have you collaborated with other artists? 

I haven’t in the past, but I will be painting with Ian Bertram at City Bird in preparation for our joint exhibit.

How do you feel about the movement of street art and graffiti into galleries? 

As my father is an artist, I grew up around galleries. I do think, though, that there is something sterile about galleries as compared to public spaces.  Showing in a gallery is very different from getting up on the streets.  And I don’t feel that the art world understands art — not just street art, any art!

Mor stencil art Centre fuge East Village NYC Speaking with Mor

How has your work evolved in the past few years? 

The streets have energized me to keep pushing myself. I feel that I’ve grown so much in just finding my process.

Have you any preferred surfaces when you are out on the streets?

I love brick walls — the way art ages on brick walls. And I like smooth doors because they’re easy to use.

How would you describe your ideal working space?

At the moment I have my ideal working space — here at Con Artist.  I love my Con Artist family. But I can imagine some day sharing a huge space with the extraordinarily talented Ian Bertram, a constant source of inspiration!

Ian Bertram art Speaking with Mor

What percentage of your time is devoted to art?

As much time as I possibly can — when I’m not dealing with family responsibilities or bartending, my main source of income.

Any thoughts about the marketing of graffiti by the corporate world?

We all know that the corporate world is filled with scoundrels and pirates, but we also know that as artists, we need its financial support.

What do you see as the role of the artist in society?

It is the artist’s role to channel deeply seated emotions and creativity in a positive way. It is an essential role.

Mor stencil art skate boards Speaking with Mor

What do you see as the future of street art?

I have no idea where it’s going. There’s been too much hype around street art.  But graffiti will always sustain. Someone will always be writing his or her name on a wall.

What’s ahead for you?

I just want to continue to channel my creativity into living a productive life as an artist, while engaging and, hopefully, enriching others.  Tomorrow night I will be showing my newest pieces, alongside Ian Bertram, at City Bird Gallery.

Ian Bertram and Mor City Bird Gallery Speaking with Mor

 Congratulations! That sounds great!

Photos: 1 and 7 City-as-School intern Zachariah Messaoud; 2, 4 and 5 Lois Stavsky; 3  Sara C. Mozeson & 6 Ian Bertram

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Living and working as a full-time artist in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, Milan native Federico Massa aka Iena Cruz first visited NYC in 2008. He has since moved here, enhancing NYC and beyond with his strikingly stylish aesthetic. This post is the first in a new series of interviews with artists born abroad who have decided to make NYC home.

iena cruz painting miami auction Federico Massa aka Iena Cruz: From Milan, Italy to Williamsburg, Bklyn

When did you first visit NYC?

It was the summer of 2008. I stayed here for a month.  At the time, I didn’t know anyone in NYC.

What brought you here? Why NYC?

I was on vacation, and I was interested in exploring other cities. I had begun to feel that Milan is too small for me.  NYC seemed like a logical place to visit.

Iena Cruz in studio Federico Massa aka Iena Cruz: From Milan, Italy to Williamsburg, Bklyn

What was your first impression of NYC?

I fell in love with it at once.  I didn’t understand it, but I loved it. I felt inspired by the chance to be connected to so many different cultures. I thought everything about NYC is great!

What was your image of NYC back in Milan?

It was out of focus. The only image I had of it came from what I saw in movies and music videos. I really had no idea what to expect.

Iena Cruz street art williamsburg NYC Federico Massa aka Iena Cruz: From Milan, Italy to Williamsburg, Bklyn

When did you decide to return here? 

I knew soon after my first visit that I needed to come back.

How did your family feel about you leaving Milan for NYC?

They were supportive. They know how difficult life is for an artist in Milan. Back home no artist is taken seriously until after he is past 50.

iena cruz puerto rico street art Federico Massa aka Iena Cruz: From Milan, Italy to Williamsburg, Bklyn

What were some of the challenges you faced once you decided to make NYC home?

I had to learn a new language. I had to find work to meet basic living expenses. I constantly had to concern myself with visa requirements and paper work. And in order to do all this, I had to put aside my painting. There was a general sense of instability.

Your current living situation is ideal – as your home is also your studio. How did you get so lucky?

I discovered this place on craigslist. When I contacted the owner, he asked me to show him a sample of my artwork! As soon as he saw it, he took me on as a tenant. At the time there were two other artists living here, both Mexican.

Iena Cruz bushwick street art Federico Massa aka Iena Cruz: From Milan, Italy to Williamsburg, Bklyn

What was that like – sharing the space with these other artists?

It was wonderful at the time! And they’ve had a tremendous influence on my aesthetic. Through them, I discovered Mexican culture, and I’ve since adapted elements of it into my artworks.

Now that the space is all yours, how do you meet all your expenses?

Largely through a variety of commissioned projects. I also sell artworks and do set design.

iena cruz street art NYC Federico Massa aka Iena Cruz: From Milan, Italy to Williamsburg, Bklyn

Do any particular projects stand out?

The huge mural I did for the Williamsburg Cinemas on the corner of Grand and Driggs was an experience! It was unlike anything I had done before – both aesthetically and in terms of the people with whom I interacted while painting it.  And last month, I had the opportunity to participate in FAAM, Fine Art Auction Miami in Wynwood.

How has your artwork evolved or changed since you came here?

My current works feature and fuse elements of Italy, Mexico and NYC.  And as I’m inspired to push myself here, my art is certain to continue to evolve and develop.

Cruz close up street art Williamsburg nyc Federico Massa aka Iena Cruz: From Milan, Italy to Williamsburg, Bklyn

How receptive have New Yorkers been to your artwork? To you?

It’s been so positive. My sense is that folks here admire my work, and they’ve been so welcoming.

What’s ahead?

Now that I have my green card, I just want to keep painting murals and exhibiting my artwork.

Interview by Lois Stavsky with City-as-School intern Zachariah Messaoud  

Photos: 1. In Miami for the FAAM MAJOR STREET ART AUCTION and 4. In Puerto Rico, courtesy of the artist; 2. In the artist’s studio, Lois Stavsky; and 3, 5-7, In NYC, Dani Reyes Mozeson

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The first day of spring 2015 brought wintry snow to NYC. Here are a few images I captured while in Greenpoint for the day:

 Phetus

phetus greenpoint Back to Greenpoint on a Snowy First Day of Spring with Phetus, Matthew Denton Burrows, Cern, Faring Purth, Shiro, Yes One, Tone. Miro & more

Matthew Denton Burrows

matthew denton burrows street art nyc Back to Greenpoint on a Snowy First Day of Spring with Phetus, Matthew Denton Burrows, Cern, Faring Purth, Shiro, Yes One, Tone. Miro & more

Cern

Cern street art greenpoint Brooklyn NYC Back to Greenpoint on a Snowy First Day of Spring with Phetus, Matthew Denton Burrows, Cern, Faring Purth, Shiro, Yes One, Tone. Miro & more

Tone

tone greenpoint Back to Greenpoint on a Snowy First Day of Spring with Phetus, Matthew Denton Burrows, Cern, Faring Purth, Shiro, Yes One, Tone. Miro & more

 Faring Purth

Farin Purth greenpoint NYC Back to Greenpoint on a Snowy First Day of Spring with Phetus, Matthew Denton Burrows, Cern, Faring Purth, Shiro, Yes One, Tone. Miro & more

ShiroYes One and Tone MST

shiro yes1 tone graffiti greenpoint nyc Back to Greenpoint on a Snowy First Day of Spring with Phetus, Matthew Denton Burrows, Cern, Faring Purth, Shiro, Yes One, Tone. Miro & more

To be identified

greenpoint graffiti nyc Back to Greenpoint on a Snowy First Day of Spring with Phetus, Matthew Denton Burrows, Cern, Faring Purth, Shiro, Yes One, Tone. Miro & more

 Miro RIS (& Shiro, top right)

Miro graffiti Greenpoint nyc Back to Greenpoint on a Snowy First Day of Spring with Phetus, Matthew Denton Burrows, Cern, Faring Purth, Shiro, Yes One, Tone. Miro & more 

Photos by Lois Stavsky

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While in L.A. earlier this week to celebrate the expansion of the Google Cultural Institute’s Street Art Project, Houda Lazrak  – co-curator of the Bushwick Collective online exhibit and the earlier 5Pointz one – had the opportunity to check out the neighboring streets. Here’s a sampling of what she found:

Beau Stanton

beau stanton street art LA Street Art NYC in L.A. with: Beau Stanton, Pixel Pancho, Fin DAC & Christina Angelina, Lady Aiko, Hueman and Roa

Pixel Pancho

Pixel Pancho street art LA Street Art NYC in L.A. with: Beau Stanton, Pixel Pancho, Fin DAC & Christina Angelina, Lady Aiko, Hueman and Roa

Fin DAC and Christina Angelina

Fin DAC Angelina Christina street art LA Street Art NYC in L.A. with: Beau Stanton, Pixel Pancho, Fin DAC & Christina Angelina, Lady Aiko, Hueman and Roa

Lady Aiko

Lady Aiko street art LA Street Art NYC in L.A. with: Beau Stanton, Pixel Pancho, Fin DAC & Christina Angelina, Lady Aiko, Hueman and Roa

Hueman

Hueman close up LA Street Art NYC in L.A. with: Beau Stanton, Pixel Pancho, Fin DAC & Christina Angelina, Lady Aiko, Hueman and Roa

Roa

Roa street art LA  Street Art NYC in L.A. with: Beau Stanton, Pixel Pancho, Fin DAC & Christina Angelina, Lady Aiko, Hueman and Roa

Photos by Houda Lazrak

Note: Houda Lazrak, a graduate student in Museum Studies at New York University, is a frequent contributor to StreetArtNYC and co-curator of the Bushwick Collective and 5Pointz on-line exhibits for the Google Cultural Institute’s Street Art Project.

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