Alice Pasquini New Journey close up street art  Back to Jersey City with Alice Pasquini, Mr. Mustart, Li Hill, Ekundayo, Sean Lugo, and Case MaClaim

In my meanderings around Jersey City this past year, I came upon a number of first-rate murals by a wonderful array of artists signed Savage Habbitalong with the artists’ signatures. Just who or what is Savage Habbit? I found out this weekend as Inez, its founder, gave me a tour of Savage Habbit’s walls and answered some questions about its mission:

Mr Mustart street art Jersey City Back to Jersey City with Alice Pasquini, Mr. Mustart, Li Hill, Ekundayo, Sean Lugo, and Case MaClaim

Just what is Savage Habbit?

It is foremost a blog that was founded in 2011.  It is dedicated to showcasing the best art that has made its way onto the streets across the globe.  Among Savage Habbit’s missions today is to bring more street art to our local community.

What motivated you to launch Savage Habbit?

I wanted a blog that represented the art that I love, and the only way I could do that was to start my own.

Li Hill paints street art Jersey City Back to Jersey City with Alice Pasquini, Mr. Mustart, Li Hill, Ekundayo, Sean Lugo, and Case MaClaim

And what about the murals?

I’m a New Jersey girl. I was born and raised here. I wanted to walk around my neighborhood and see art in my community. And I wanted to give back to my state. These murals benefit everyone!

When did your first mural surface?

Last year — in 2013.

Ekundayo street art nyc Back to Jersey City with Alice Pasquini, Mr. Mustart, Li Hill, Ekundayo, Sean Lugo, and Case MaClaim

What has been your greatest challenge?

Finding walls.

You seem to have facilitated quite a few murals. How do you find the artists?

Some contact me, and others I contact when I see that they are in town.

sean lugo street art jersey city Back to Jersey City with Alice Pasquini, Mr. Mustart, Li Hill, Ekundayo, Sean Lugo, and Case MaClaim

What’s ahead?

There are five confirmed walls.  Savage Habbit’s next wall will feature Nanook and Mata Ruda.

And what about the name “Savage Habbit?” What does it represent?

The name is derived from a Wu Tang quote:  Ricochet Rabbit had a habit, he was a savage. We are savagely passionate about our habit, art!

case maclaim street art mural jersey city Back to Jersey City with Alice Pasquini, Mr. Mustart, Li Hill, Ekundayo, Sean Lugo, and Case MaClaim

That sounds right!  We look forward to seeing more art on the streets of Jersey City.

Brief interview and photos by Lois Stavsky

1. Alice Pasquini, close-up

2. Mr. Mustart

3. Li-Hill at work yesterday

4. Ekundayo

5. Sean Lugo

6. Case, MA`CLAIM, close-up

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Wallnuts street art graffiti characters NYC The Wallnuts, SHYE131 and Trans1 in Long Island City

One of the most dynamic graffiti productions in town can be found in Long Island City off Queensboro Plaza.  Showcasing the talents of the Wallnuts, UK-based artists SHYE131 and Trans1, the murals exude an exuberant, infectious energy. Here are a few close-ups from the pride of the neighborhood:

Manny Muse, Wallnuts

Manny Muse The Wallnuts, SHYE131 and Trans1 in Long Island City

Chester Wallnuts

Chester wallnuts NYC graffiti The Wallnuts, SHYE131 and Trans1 in Long Island City

Been3 Wallnuts

Been3 graffiti LIC NYC The Wallnuts, SHYE131 and Trans1 in Long Island City

Col Wallnuts

Col wallnuts graffiti NYC The Wallnuts, SHYE131 and Trans1 in Long Island City

SHYE131

SHYE graffiti NYC The Wallnuts, SHYE131 and Trans1 in Long Island City

Trans1

Trans1 street art The Wallnuts, SHYE131 and Trans1 in Long Island City

 Photos by Lois Stavsky

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Chris RWK Woodward Gallery Project Space1 Speaking with Chris RWK

Founder of the much-loved Robots Will Kill, Staten Island-based artist Chris Rwk Chillemi’s creates delightful character-driven artworks that find a home on the streets, in galleries and — most recently — on WAT-AAH!‘s premium bottled drinking water.  I was delighted to interview him.

When did it all begin? When did you first get into graffiti?

It was back in 1988 in Huguenot, Staten Island. I was 11. My brother and his friends started doing graffiti back then, and I would tag along and photograph it. About two years later, I began doodling on public surfaces.

We associate you with your hugely lovable, iconic characters. What was the inspiration behind them?

Letters didn’t hold my attention for all that long, as I’d always been so interested in cartoons and comics. I loved Gary Larson, Jim Davis and Disney stuff. Their styles were all different, but they all had really strong imagery and messages. My first illegal piece, in fact, was the wizard from Hagar the Horrible with a spray can doing a throw up! I can still remember the colors!

Chris RWK Speaking with Chris RWK

What about Robots Will Kill? Can you tell us something about its origin?

Back in 1999, while on a fellowship in Vermont, I came upon a friend, Chris Rini, painting a giant cellphone holding a man! That’s when I came up with the notion that “robots will kill.”  If you do something too much and too often, it becomes robotic, and you lose your love for it.

Robots Will Kill – that began with you – has evolved into an informal global collective. Who are some of its members?

At first it was just me. Then Kevin and a bit later Veng joined. Since, we’ve collaborated with such artists as Peeta, ECB, Flying Fortress, JesseR. OverUnder and Mike Die.

Would you rather paint alone? Or do you prefer to collaborate with others?

I love both. In my studio, I’d rather work alone. But I love painting with others outdoors as it pushes me to another level.

Any thoughts about illegal vs. legal graffiti?

Ideally — what begins illegally evolves into something legal.

Chris RWK Veng RWK street art NYC Speaking with Chris RWK

You’ve exhibited your work in dozens of galleries. How do you feel about showing in formal settings?

It’s great. There are lots of folks who would never notice my work on the streets.  But when it’s in a gallery, they will have to pay attention to it.

What about the graffiti/street art divide? You seem to successfully straddle both.

Street artists need to respect graffiti writers. They don’t always do. They need to learn the history.

What about the corporate world? How do you feel about sharing your talents with private comporations?

Things aren’t black and white anymore. It’s not a matter of us vs. them. I don’t mind working for a corporation, so long as it’s an ethical one. The corporate world makes money. Why shouldn’t we artists benefit from it?

Chris RWK and Veng RWK street art Bushwick NYC Speaking with Chris RWK

What is the riskiest thing you’ve ever done?

I play it safe. I’m not a risk-taker. When I was in high school, my tag was ND – No Drugs…Never Drunk…Never Dull! I’ve been straight edge my whole life.

How does your family feel about what you were doing?

My family has always been supportive. When I was a kid, they built a wall in my backyard, so I could practice!

You have a 9-5 day job here in Manhattan and you live in Staten Island. How do you manage to find time to do so much great art?

My weekday schedule is tough.  I have to wake up at 6am to leave my house at 7, and I’m often not back home until 7 in the evening. I then have to help my son with his homework. I generally don’t begin working on my art until 10pm, and I don’t get to sleep until 2-3am.

Chris RWK and Veng and Gilf street art WilliamsburgNYC Speaking with Chris RWK

Wow! That is a rough schedule. When you work, do you sketch first or do you just let it flow?

About 70% of the time, I work from a sketch.

Are you generally satisfied with your finished piece?

Yes – but my satisfaction is increased when I get a positive response to it from others.

Have you any ideal work environment?

I need background noise, so that I don’t overly think about what I’m doing!

Chris RWK stickers character on canvas Speaking with Chris RWK

Do you have a formal art education?

I earned my Associate degree at FIT and a BFA in painting from Hunter College.

Do you feel that you benefited from it?

Definitely, as so many elements – from choice of colors to spatial design — are involved in creating a first-rate piece.

Are there any particular cultures that have influenced your aesthetic?

The comic book culture, the sci-fi one and the graffiti culture. I’ve also been inspired by hot-rods and the urban culture, in general.

Chris RWK wat aah Speaking with Chris RWK

What is the source of your inspiration these days?

I’d say my family, my friends and my personal experiences.

How has your work evolved in the past few years?

It’s become more personal. My use of layers and colors has become more important to me. And when I paint, I tend to take my audience into consideration more than I used to.

How do you feel about the role of the Internet in all this?

I think it’s amazing that something I do here can be seen minutes later by someone in Australia. But I also think we’ve been oversaturated with blogs and Instagram.

Chris RWK street art character NYC Speaking with Chris RWK

Have you any feelings about the photographers/bloggers in the scene?

On the positive side, they help get artists known. But I don’t think much thought goes into much of what makes its way out there.

What do you see as the role of the artist in society?

He’s a muse for the general public. Without art, there’d be a lot less for folks to see, feel, think about and talk about.

What do you see as the future of street art and graffiti?

There’s too much going on right now, and too many people trying to get into the game. And so it is likely to fizzle out. But those who are true will survive its fallout. And what will emerge will be even stronger.

What about you? What’s ahead for you?

I will continue to do what I do. Create, paint and get my stickers out there!

Note: Chris will be a featured artist of WAT-AAH!’s upcoming exhibit in Chicago on July 18-20 as part of WAT-AAH! Taking Back the Streets art campaign, which connects today’s leading street artists with the brand’s mission to fight childhood obesity and promote healthy hydration among kids and teens. Joining the likes of Kenny Scharf, Swoon, Shepard Fairey, Haze and Chicago-based POSE, Chris has created a one-of-a kind WAT-AAH! label design featuring PHA’s “Drink Up” drop, as well as an original piece of art (shown above) that becomes featured in the brand’s traveling art campaign, which has been touring the country since its launch in NYC this past February. For more information, visit  wat-aahstreets.com  and follow @wataahstreets.

Interview conducted and edited by Lois Stavsky; photos: 1. and 8. Dani Reyes Mozeson; 2. Original artwork created for WAT-AAH! Taking Back the Streets art Campaign. Chris RWK.  I Tried to Stop.  36″x48″. Mixed media. Image courtesy WAT-AAH! 3. With Veng, Tara Murray; 4. – 6. Lois Stavsky  7. Limited edition bottle design for WAT-AAH! Taking Back the Streets art campaign. Image courtesy WAT-AAH! 

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BG183 graffiti character group ink gallery nine5 TATS CRU, KET and Bisco Smith Begin SoHo Based gallery nine5s Transformation in GROUP INK

The transformation of SoHo-based gallery nine5’s walls from “a private space into a public sphere” has begun with expressive murals — from the playful to the political —  by TATS CRU, Ket and Bisco Smith.  Here’s a sampling of what’s been happening:

TATS CRU‘s BG183 at work to the right of Bio and Nicer

BG183 paints Gallerynine5 TATS CRU, KET and Bisco Smith Begin SoHo Based gallery nine5s Transformation in GROUP INK

BG183 tats cru gallery nine5 TATS CRU, KET and Bisco Smith Begin SoHo Based gallery nine5s Transformation in GROUP INK

Tats Cru gallery nine5 group ink TATS CRU, KET and Bisco Smith Begin SoHo Based gallery nine5s Transformation in GROUP INK

Ket installs dozens of newspaper articles illustrating human sufferings, largely the result of wars

Ket installs for Group Ink TATS CRU, KET and Bisco Smith Begin SoHo Based gallery nine5s Transformation in GROUP INK

And paints over them 

Alan Ket installation gallerynine5 TATS CRU, KET and Bisco Smith Begin SoHo Based gallery nine5s Transformation in GROUP INK

With quote from historian and social activist Howard Zinn

Ket installation Howard Zinn Gallery nine5 TATS CRU, KET and Bisco Smith Begin SoHo Based gallery nine5s Transformation in GROUP INK

And Bisco Smith – in from the West Coast — graces the wall with his distinct aesthetic 

Bisco Smith installation close up gallerynine5 TATS CRU, KET and Bisco Smith Begin SoHo Based gallery nine5s Transformation in GROUP INK

Bisco Smith mural gallery nine5 TATS CRU, KET and Bisco Smith Begin SoHo Based gallery nine5s Transformation in GROUP INK

The public is invited to observe, explore and join the conversation as Vor138, Shiro and Rubin415 contribute to the further transitory makeover of gallery nine5. Keep posted to StreetArtNYC for updates and, if you are in town, be sure to check out the opening reception on July 17, 6-8pm. gallery nine5 is located at 24 Spring Street in SoHo.

Action photos by Dani Reyes Mozeson; others by Lois Stavsky

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Marka27 Marka27, Don Rimx and Ian Kuali`i in TR3SPASS at the Dumbo Spot

Both on the streets and in their studios, Marka27, Don Rimx & Ian Kuali`i fashion extraordinarily rich tantalizing images. An intriguing selection of their largely character-driven mixed-media paintings, prints and more were presented by M27 Designs in the remarkable one-night pop-up exhibit TR3SPASS at the Dumbo Spot this past Friday evening. Here’s a small sampling:

Victor “Marka27″ Quiñonez

Marka27 character Marka27, Don Rimx and Ian Kuali`i in TR3SPASS at the Dumbo Spot

Marka27 artTrespass Marka27, Don Rimx and Ian Kuali`i in TR3SPASS at the Dumbo Spot

Ian Kuali`i

Ian in tresspass Marka27, Don Rimx and Ian Kuali`i in TR3SPASS at the Dumbo Spot

Ian Marka27, Don Rimx and Ian Kuali`i in TR3SPASS at the Dumbo Spot

David “Don Rimx” Sepulveda

Don Rimx character art Trespass Marka27, Don Rimx and Ian Kuali`i in TR3SPASS at the Dumbo Spot

Don Rimx character Trespass1 Marka27, Don Rimx and Ian Kuali`i in TR3SPASS at the Dumbo Spot

Photos of artwork by Sara C. Mozeson and Lois Stavsky

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Rime graffiti art Jersey City Somethings Brewing Over the Hudson: In Jersey City with Rime, Post, Li Hill, Sean Lugo, SP.One, Mata Ruda, LNY, Enoe and more to come

On my recent visit to Jersey City, Gregory D. Edgell aka the Green Villain gave me a tour of some of the city’s first-rate graffiti murals, including a number of recent ones that he had facilitated. Upon further exploration, I came upon some amazing street art walls.  What follows are samples of both and a brief conversation with Greg:

Poser graffiti art Jersey City Somethings Brewing Over the Hudson: In Jersey City with Rime, Post, Li Hill, Sean Lugo, SP.One, Mata Ruda, LNY, Enoe and more to come

What brought you to Jersey City? And when did you first come here?

I moved here in 2009. My best friend – at the time – had moved into a huge warehouse that seemed like the ideal venue for artistic expression. And that’s what brought me here.

Li Hill street art Jersey City Somethings Brewing Over the Hudson: In Jersey City with Rime, Post, Li Hill, Sean Lugo, SP.One, Mata Ruda, LNY, Enoe and more to come

What changes have you observed since moving here?

Jersey City is increasingly attracting more artists and is slowly developing a street art culture, but there are still far too many blank walls.

LNY Mata Ruda close up Jersey City Somethings Brewing Over the Hudson: In Jersey City with Rime, Post, Li Hill, Sean Lugo, SP.One, Mata Ruda, LNY, Enoe and more to come

Where do you think it’s all going? 

Jersey City has the potential to be just as creative as any neighborhood in NYC. It could even be more so, as it’s not as expensive. Within the next five years, this will happen!

SP.one graffiti Jersey City Somethings Brewing Over the Hudson: In Jersey City with Rime, Post, Li Hill, Sean Lugo, SP.One, Mata Ruda, LNY, Enoe and more to come

Mana Contemporary has certainly enhanced Jersey City with its studios, exhibition spaces and more. And soon it will be launching the Mana Museum of Urban Arts, the world’s first permanent space dedicated to street art and graffiti. Any thoughts about that?

I think it’s amazing and particularly wonderful for the global street art and graffiti community, as Mana Contemporary has the backing to create a first-rate educational platform for this art form.

sean lugo artist Jersey City Somethings Brewing Over the Hudson: In Jersey City with Rime, Post, Li Hill, Sean Lugo, SP.One, Mata Ruda, LNY, Enoe and more to come

And what’s ahead for you?

I am currently facilitating a series of murals by some first-rate artists. Among them are: Sheryo & the Yok, Rubin, Jerkface, Mr. Mustart and Distort & Then One.

Enoe graffiti art Jersey City Somethings Brewing Over the Hudson: In Jersey City with Rime, Post, Li Hill, Sean Lugo, SP.One, Mata Ruda, LNY, Enoe and more to come

That sounds great! We’re looking forward to seeing them — as Jersey City is just minutes away from Manhattan!

Interview and photos by Lois Stavsky

1. Rime aka Jersey Joe

2. Post

3. Li Hill

4. Mata Ruda and LNY

5. Sean Lugo

6. SP.One

7. Enoe

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Zeso graffiti Inwood Up in Inwood with Crane, Zeso, 1port and Just WF

One of Upper Manhattan’s gems is the wall on 207th Street and 10th Avenue, directly off the 207th Street stop on the 1 line. Under the direction of South Bronx native Crane, who works up in Inwood, its murals are always changing and always worth checking out. This past Monday, Crane was joined by Zeso1port — in from France — and Just WF aka Just One. Here are some more images captured that day:

Crane at work early in the evening — after a day of work

Crane graffiti NYC Up in Inwood with Crane, Zeso, 1port and Just WF

1port at work adding his touch to Zeso,’s mural

Zeso graffiti and Import Up in Inwood with Crane, Zeso, 1port and Just WF

1port

Import graffiti street art character NYC Up in Inwood with Crane, Zeso, 1port and Just WF

Just WF

Just One graffiti Inwood NYC Up in Inwood with Crane, Zeso, 1port and Just WF

A source of pride to local businesses and residents, this wall is one of three in Inwood under Crane’s curatorial management.

Photos 1 and 3 by City-as-School intern Travis Hicks; photos 2, 4, and 5 by Lois Stavsky

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Speaking with Shiro

June 25, 2014

Huge fans of Shiro’s vibrant, playful aesthetic, we were delighted to meet up with her this past week at SoHo’s gallery nine5, where she will be participating in the gallery’s summer show, GROUP INK.

Shiro graffiti art welling court 2 Speaking with Shiro

When and where did you first get up?

Back in 1998 in Shizuoka, Japan.

What inspired you at the time?

I remember seeing a video with graffiti as the backdrop. I was impressed!  And soon after, I saw the movie Wild Style.

Any early memories stand out?

I remember having to create my own tools. I couldn’t get hold of any spray paint in aerosol cans at the time, and so I had to be inventive. I mostly used hair spray and mosquito spray containers that I filled with paint.

How did your family feel about what you were doing?

At the time my mother didn’t understand it, but now she appreciates it.

Shiro street art mural at 5Pointz NYC Speaking with Shiro

What percentage of your time is devoted to art?

When I am in NYC, 100%. But back in Japan, I work as a nurse, and I can’t devote as much time to my art as I would like to.

Wow! A nurse and a graffiti writer!

Yes, a nurse heals, and so does art.

Have you exhibited your work in galleries?

I’ve shown my work in galleries in the U.S., Germany and Japan. And I’ve participated in projects in India, China, Australia, New Zealand and the Philippines.

Have you any thoughts about the movement of graffiti and street art into galleries?

I’d rather paint on a wall than on a canvas. But when I create work for galleries, I learn and perfect new techniques.

shiro yes1 tone sans 2 Speaking with Shiro

What inspires you these days?

I’m inspired by my own experiences in different situations…and by my imagination. In my art I can be anything!

Are there any particular cultures that have influenced your aesthetics?

The entire graffiti and hip-hop culture, along with, I suppose, my Japanese roots.

What is the riskiest thing you ever did?

I hadn’t planned it to be risky. But back in 2002, I found a deserted wall in Forest Hills, Queens that I thought would be the perfect canvas for me.  As I began painting, a group of boys suddenly appeared and stole my spray paint. One of them had a gun. Soon they were hurling stones and although they weren’t aiming the stones at me, some rocks did hit me and injured me.

Gee, that sounds traumatizing. Do you generally paint alone?

I love painting alone. I am very independent! But I’ve also painted with crews and collaborated with other writers.

shiro meres demer street art graffiti 5Pointz Speaking with Shiro

What are some of the crews you’ve painted with?

TDS (The Death Squad), SUG (Stick Up Girlz), FX and UZNJ (Universal Zulu Nation Japan)

What’s it like being a female writer in what is so much of a man’s world?

I forget about gender when I’m painting. It’s irrelevant.

Do you work with a sketch in hand or do you just let it flow?

Sometimes I work with a sketch; other times I just let it flow.

Shiro and Ree graffiti NYC Speaking with Shiro

Are you generally satisfied with your finished piece?

I mostly feel very happy with it!

How has your work evolved through the years?

It is more detailed, and I paint more quickly. I’ve developed much better can control than I had earlier.

What’s ahead?

I just got my artist’s visa, and so I’m looking forward to spending more time here.  I will just go with the flow!

Note:  Shiro will be participating in gallery nine5‘s summer show, GROUP INK. Along with TATS CRU, Bisco Smith, Alan Ket, Vor138 and Rubin415, she will be transforming the private space over at 24 Spring Street into a public one. It all begins today, Wednesday, June 25 with TATS and bare walls! Keep posted to our Facebook page for updates.

Photos: 1. Welling Court Mural Project, Dani Reyes Mozeson; 2. 5Pointz, Tara Murray; 3. With Sans, Tone and Yes One in Greenpoint, Dani Reyes Mozeson 4. With Meres and Demer at 5Pointz, Dani Reyes Mozeson & 5. On uptown wall with Ree on right in Inwood, Lois Stavsky

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boy kong street art character NYC Florida Based Boy Kong Brings His Playful Aesthetic to NYC Streets and to the Cotton Candy Machine

Orlando, Florida-based artist Boy Kong recently left his mark in NYC. His delightfully fanciful aesthetic has made its way to the exterior of rag & bone on Elizabeth Street in Manhattan and to the shutter at 175 Roebling Street in Williamsburg, Brooklyn. A selection of his distinctly crafted individual pieces can also be seen at Cotton Candy Machine, 235 South 1st Street in Williamsburg, through this week.

On Roebling Street in Williamsburg

Boy Kong street art Williamsburg NYC Florida Based Boy Kong Brings His Playful Aesthetic to NYC Streets and to the Cotton Candy Machine

And a sampling of what’s on view at at Cotton Candy Machine 

Boy Kong Cotton Candy artwork Florida Based Boy Kong Brings His Playful Aesthetic to NYC Streets and to the Cotton Candy Machine

Boy Kong at Cotton Candy Florida Based Boy Kong Brings His Playful Aesthetic to NYC Streets and to the Cotton Candy Machine

Boy Kong Art Cotton Candy Machine Florida Based Boy Kong Brings His Playful Aesthetic to NYC Streets and to the Cotton Candy Machine

Photos by Dani Reyes Mozeson 

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Following are a few more images from Ad Hoc Art’‘s wonderful Fifth Annual Welling Court Mural Project, along with a brief interview with its director, Garrison Buxton.

cern street art welling court mural project astoria queens NYC Ad Hoc Art’s Fifth Annual Welling Court Mural Project — Part II:  Cern, R. Robot, KR One, Ryan Seslow & Cake, Mr. Prvrt and See One

Can you tell us something about the birth of the Welling Court Mural Project? When and how did it all begin?

Jonathan Ellis, a Welling Court resident, came up with the idea for the project over five years ago. He had his wife, Georgiana, were looking to improve their block.  We were introduced through a mutual friend who suggested they contact me.

R Robot street art welling court nyc Ad Hoc Art’s Fifth Annual Welling Court Mural Project — Part II:  Cern, R. Robot, KR One, Ryan Seslow & Cake, Mr. Prvrt and See One

What was the first mural to go up? And when was the first festival held?

While visiting from Poland in 2009, M-City painted Welling Court’s first mural.  The first festival was held in June 2009.

KR 1 graffiti art Ad Hoc Art’s Fifth Annual Welling Court Mural Project — Part II:  Cern, R. Robot, KR One, Ryan Seslow & Cake, Mr. Prvrt and See One

What was the community’s response to it?

The response was wonderful. The entire community participated and loved it. Just about everyone prepared food to share and loved how the artists transformed their neighborhood.

ryan seslow and cake street art welling court nyc Ad Hoc Art’s Fifth Annual Welling Court Mural Project — Part II:  Cern, R. Robot, KR One, Ryan Seslow & Cake, Mr. Prvrt and See One

And now five years later, it’s even more wonderful than ever.

Yes, when we first began, 44 artists participated. This year there are over twice as many, including members of the community. We’ve continued to keep it grassroots.

Mr. PRVRT street art welling court mural project nyc Ad Hoc Art’s Fifth Annual Welling Court Mural Project — Part II:  Cern, R. Robot, KR One, Ryan Seslow & Cake, Mr. Prvrt and See One

How far in advance do you begin organizing each year’s festival?

We usually start in February, but we want to begin planning earlier.

see one street art welling court nyc Ad Hoc Art’s Fifth Annual Welling Court Mural Project — Part II:  Cern, R. Robot, KR One, Ryan Seslow & Cake, Mr. Prvrt and See One

What would you say is your greatest challenge?

The mere organization and the delegation of the different responsibilities.

The vibe here is wonderful. What a great model you are for other communities! 

Yes! It’s about the power of art to create positive social change.

Photos by Dani Reyes Mozeson and Lois Stavsky

1. Cern  

2. R. Nicholas Kuszyk aka R. Robot 

3. Louie “KR.ONE” Gasparro 

4. Ryan Seslow and Jennifer Caviola aka Cake

5. Mr. Prvrt

6. See One

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