With a strong presence on the streets throughout Manhattan, Brooklyn, the Bronx and Queens, Joseph Meloy’s distinctive aesthetic has also made its way into a range of galleries and alternative spaces.  Opening this evening at Galerie Protégé at 197 Ninth Avenue in Chelsea is The Playground of the Fantastical!, an intriguing selection of Meloy’s recent works on an array of surfaces. I stopped by the exhibit yesterday and also had the opportunity to speak to Joseph.

Joseph Meloy street art Manhattan nyc Joseph Meloy on Street Art, Vandal Expressionism, The Playground of the Fantastical! and more

You have quite a presence on the streets. What inspired you to get your vision up on public spaces?

As a kid, I was obsessed with Cost and Revs.  Their presence on the streets fascinated me. I used to stay up until two in the morning to watch their public access show. Undoubtedly, they were an inspiration.

When did you first get up and where?

When I was a student at the Bronx High School of Science, I was into drawing squirrels – and I began hanging posters of them all over my school. But 2006 is when I started getting wheat pastes up on the streets. They were largely random digital creations at the time.

What about galleries? The Playground of the Fantastical is your second exhibit at Galerie Protégé.  When did you first begin showing in galleries?

My first exhibit was in a pop-up space back in 2011. Since, I’ve shown in quite a few spaces – from alternative ones to more traditional gallery settings. Among these are — in addition to Galerie Protégé – Le Salon d’ Art,  Succulent Studios, and the Fountain Art Fair.

Joseph Meloy abstract Joseph Meloy on Street Art, Vandal Expressionism, The Playground of the Fantastical! and more

How do you feel about the movement of graffiti and street art into galleries?

It’s a natural and inevitable progression.  What’s happening now is a resurgence of what was going down 30 years ago.

Do you have a formal arts education?

No. I majored in Spanish in college. I’m self-taught.

What inspires you these days?

Introspection. My inspiration is internal.

Joseph Meloy at Galerie Protege Joseph Meloy on Street Art, Vandal Expressionism, The Playground of the Fantastical! and more

Has your aesthetic been influenced by any particular cultures?

No one particular culture. But there are obvious influences from ancient hieroglyphics and palaeographics.

What is your ideal working environment?

Any place with enough room for me to create without having to worry about messing it up.

Are there any particular artists whose aesthetics have inspired or influenced you?

Michael Alan – a friend who is a wonderful artist and inspiration. And I suppose that — like so many others — I’ve been inspired and influenced by Keith Haring and Basquiat.

Joseph Meloy art close up Joseph Meloy on Street Art, Vandal Expressionism, The Playground of the Fantastical! and more

Would you rather work alone or collaborate with other artists?

I like the concept of collaboration, but it’s easier for me to work alone. I’ve successfully collaborated with Michael Alan and Fumero, and I’m looking forward to collaborating with Col, Wallnuts.

We identify you with the term Vandal Expressionism – that you coined. Can you tell us something about that?  When did it originate? What does it mean?

I came up with it in the summer of 2010. It seemed to best represent what I do and who I am. It signifies how I repurposed the visual language of graffiti and street art. And it’s quite universal, as it translates well into other languages.

What about the title of this show – the Playground of the Fantastical?

It was actually coined by the gallery’s director, Robert Dimin, as it reflects both my work and that of the Brazilian artist, Maria Lynch, who is exhibiting alongside me. The title is perfect as it suggests both a childlike innocence and a whimsical sense of adventure.

Meloy street art NYC Joseph Meloy on Street Art, Vandal Expressionism, The Playground of the Fantastical! and more

What do you see as the role of the artist in society?

The artist has many roles – to reflect on society, to inspire…to amuse…and to make people think.

I can certainly see that in your work!

Note: The Playground of the Fantastical opens tonight, Thursday, from 6-8pm at 197 Ninth Avenue and 22nd Street and continues through October 3rd. Tomorrow evening Joseph Meloy will be exhibiting along with City Kitty and others in Downtown Denim at the City Life Gallery in Jersey City.

Interview conducted and edited by Lois Stavsky; photos 1 and 4 by Dani Reyes Mozeson; 2 and 3 by Lois Stavsky and 5 by Tara Murray.

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Speaking with Sean Lugo

September 3, 2014

Based in Weehawken, New Jersey, Sean Lugo has been sharing his distinct vision and talents with us not only on the streets of nearby Jersey City, but here in NYC, as well. I was delighted to have the opportunity to speak to him.

sean lugo self portrait Speaking with Sean Lugo

When did you first get up? And where?

It was back in 1998; I was 17. I tagged up around my neighborhood in Union City, NJ.

Had you any preferred surfaces back then?

Nope! Any open space was fine.

How did your family feel about what you were doing?

I was living with my sister at the time. She thought I was an idiot!

Sean Lugo artwork Speaking with Sean Lugo

Have you any early graffiti-related memories that stand out?

I remember going to a Mets game with my father and seeing graffiti on the trains and at 5Pointz as we rode by on the 7 line. I was amazed! It was the most graffiti I’d ever seen anywhere. I was about 12 at the time.

What percentage of your day is devoted to art?

Just about all of it! I work as an art handler during the day, and then I spend about five hours each day working on my own art.

Any other interests?

Sports. I love football!

Sean Lugogreenpoint 2 Speaking with Sean Lugo

Any thoughts on the graffiti/ street art divide?

I don’t personally feel the divide. They are both outlets for us to express ourselves.

How do you feel about the movement of graffiti and street art into galleries

I like it! I’d like to see even more gallery owners open their spaces to us. Folks who run galleries need to be more aware of what’s going on in the streets.

How you feel about the role of the Internet in this scene?

I think it’s beautiful.  It’s connected me to so many others.

Sean Lugo street art NYC Speaking with Sean Lugo

Do you have a formal arts education?

No. I’m self-taught.

What’s the riskiest thing you’ve done?

Well, definitely the stupidest was bombing with Werds off the High Line. We climbed up via a truck, and after spending over eight hours up there, we had to jump down to reach the ground.

What inspires you these days?

Concepts. I’m inspired by the masks that people wear as they try to project a false illusion of themselves. Most people are fake. And it is the incongruity between who people appear to be and who they really are that drives my art these days.

sean lugo artist Jersey City Speaking with Sean Lugo

Has your aesthetic been influenced by any particular cultures?

I’m influenced by all cultures – but particularly my own, the Spanish culture.

Do you work with a sketch in your hand, or do you let it flow?

I draw everything out, and I like to choose a spot before I draw.

What is your ideal working environment?

A quiet room with any kind of music in the background.

sean lugo pig street art Speaking with Sean Lugo

Are you generally satisfied with your finished product?

Yes.

How has your work evolved in the past few years?

It’s become more dramatic, and I engage with it more seriously.

How’s that?

I look at life differently than I used to. On August 1, 2011, I was in a car accident in Jersey City. The guy who hit me died, and I almost did. As a result of this trauma, I’ve come to understand just how brief and fragile life is.

And can you tell us something about wheat pastes – your preferred medium?

Yes, I love using wheat pastes because they perfectly mirror life’s temporality.

Sean Lugo street art character Speaking with Sean Lugo

What do you see as the role of the artist in society?

To spur others to become more creative.

And what about how society views the artist? Any thoughts as to how others view you?

Too many folks view art as a business.

Any favorite artists who share their work on the streets?

So many! But to name a few: LNY, Ekundayo, Vinz, NoseGo

What’s ahead?

I want to continue doing art on the streets and interacting more with public space. I’d love to create an entire, interactive scene just using wheatpastes!

Interview conducted and edited by Lois Stavsky; photos 3, 5 and 6 by Lois Stavsky; others courtesy of Sean Lugo.

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Groundswell public art community NYC  Groundswell Youth Muralists    with Esteban del Valle and Jose de Jesus Rodriguez    Address Mass Incarceration on Brownsville Mural

We were introduced to Esteban del Valle’s remarkable talents a number of years back at 5Pointz. We’ve since seen his deftly crafted artwork in Bushwick, the Lower East Side, Red Hook, Welling Court and recently at the 21st Precinct Art Exhibit.  And in addition to forging his own artwork, Esteban has been sharing his skills and vision with youth this past summer in Brownsville, Brooklyn.  Last week, the mural created by 17 young men in Groundswell’s Summer Leadership Institute, along with Esteban and his assistant artist, Jose de Jesus Rodriguez, was officially unveiled.  Located at 417 Junius Street on the wall of the Food Bazaar Supermaket, it represents the best possible model for public art. At the mural’s dedication ceremony, I had the opportunity to find out from Esteban a bit more about this particular project, P. I. C. T. U. R. E. S Prison Industrial Complex: Tyranny Undermining Rights, Education and Society.

Esteban del valle public mural NYC  Groundswell Youth Muralists    with Esteban del Valle and Jose de Jesus Rodriguez    Address Mass Incarceration on Brownsville Mural

This mural is quite amazing. When did you begin working on it?

We began on July 2nd.

Can you tell us something about the process?

We spent the first two weeks researching the issue, discussing the justice system and designing our representation of it. The final four weeks were devoted to painting the mural.

Groundswell Public Art  Groundswell Youth Muralists    with Esteban del Valle and Jose de Jesus Rodriguez    Address Mass Incarceration on Brownsville Mural

Why this topic?

It’s of particular relevance to this community. We see this mural as a way to raise awareness and provoke discussion about the subject of the prison industrial complex. Some of the youth involved in this all-male Making His’tory mural team have had first-hand experience with the way the justice system functions.

Esteban del valle public mural  Groundswell Youth Muralists    with Esteban del Valle and Jose de Jesus Rodriguez    Address Mass Incarceration on Brownsville Mural

How have the young muralists responded to this project?

The response has been great. We’ve had many intense discussions and we can all walk away with a sense of accomplishment.

What has this experience been like for you, personally?

It was very exciting. And it was great for all of us to see an idea executed into a reality.

Esteban del valle and Groundswell youth street art mural close up  Groundswell Youth Muralists    with Esteban del Valle and Jose de Jesus Rodriguez    Address Mass Incarceration on Brownsville Mural

Have you any personal message?

With these tools (pen and paint brush in hand), you can change your life and your community.

Elijah Barrington, one of the project’s participants, added the following to our conversation:  We sweated every day to get this wall to look the way we wanted it to. I felt focused and happy, and I learned so much. I’m already looking forward to the next project.

Brief interview and photos by Lois Stavsky

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Topaz graffiti NYC At the NYC Graffiti Hall of Fame with Topaz, Scratch, Ligisd, Hops, Bver, Wiz Art & Queen Andrea and on the Street with Tats Cru, Crash. Nick Walker and more

Yesterday at noon, the 14th edition of the NYC Graffiti Hall of Fame, presented by Joey TDS and James Top, was officially launched inside the famed East Harlem schoolyard on 106th Street and Park Avenue. Here is a small sampling of what went down during the early afternoon:

Topaz

Topaz graffiti mural NYC At the NYC Graffiti Hall of Fame with Topaz, Scratch, Ligisd, Hops, Bver, Wiz Art & Queen Andrea and on the Street with Tats Cru, Crash. Nick Walker and more

Scratch

scratch graffiti hall of fame At the NYC Graffiti Hall of Fame with Topaz, Scratch, Ligisd, Hops, Bver, Wiz Art & Queen Andrea and on the Street with Tats Cru, Crash. Nick Walker and more

Ligisd

Graffiti Hall of Fame At the NYC Graffiti Hall of Fame with Topaz, Scratch, Ligisd, Hops, Bver, Wiz Art & Queen Andrea and on the Street with Tats Cru, Crash. Nick Walker and more

Hops

Hops street Art graffiti hall of fame At the NYC Graffiti Hall of Fame with Topaz, Scratch, Ligisd, Hops, Bver, Wiz Art & Queen Andrea and on the Street with Tats Cru, Crash. Nick Walker and more

Bver

Bver graffiti hall of fame NYC At the NYC Graffiti Hall of Fame with Topaz, Scratch, Ligisd, Hops, Bver, Wiz Art & Queen Andrea and on the Street with Tats Cru, Crash. Nick Walker and more

Wiz Art

Wiz Art graffiti hall of fame nyc At the NYC Graffiti Hall of Fame with Topaz, Scratch, Ligisd, Hops, Bver, Wiz Art & Queen Andrea and on the Street with Tats Cru, Crash. Nick Walker and more

Queen Andrea

Queen Andrea graffiti Hall of Fame NYC At the NYC Graffiti Hall of Fame with Topaz, Scratch, Ligisd, Hops, Bver, Wiz Art & Queen Andrea and on the Street with Tats Cru, Crash. Nick Walker and more

 And earlier in the week, Tats Cru – with Crash and Nick Walker – fashioned a huge mural outside the school yard. Here are some close-ups:

crash bio nick walker At the NYC Graffiti Hall of Fame with Topaz, Scratch, Ligisd, Hops, Bver, Wiz Art & Queen Andrea and on the Street with Tats Cru, Crash. Nick Walker and more

Tats Cru graffti Hall of Fame copy At the NYC Graffiti Hall of Fame with Topaz, Scratch, Ligisd, Hops, Bver, Wiz Art & Queen Andrea and on the Street with Tats Cru, Crash. Nick Walker and more

Tats close up At the NYC Graffiti Hall of Fame with Topaz, Scratch, Ligisd, Hops, Bver, Wiz Art & Queen Andrea and on the Street with Tats Cru, Crash. Nick Walker and more

The 14th edition of the NYC Graffiti Hall of Fame continues today from noon to 8pm.

Photos by Dani Reyes Mozeson

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Featuring a wondrous array of characters in a diverse range of styles, What a Character – curated by See One – continues through September 11 at Low Brow Artique. Here are a few of the characters — from the comical to the surreal — that greet you:

Patch Whisky, Tripping Faces

patch whiskey character artwork painting What a Character Continues through Sept. 11 at Low Brow Artique with:  Patch Whisky, Reno Msad, Chris Cortes, Royce Bannon, Plasmaslug, Shiro and more

Reno Msad, Multiple Personalities

Reno Msad Multiple Personalities artwork What a Character Continues through Sept. 11 at Low Brow Artique with:  Patch Whisky, Reno Msad, Chris Cortes, Royce Bannon, Plasmaslug, Shiro and more

Chris Cortes, Dragon

chris cortes character What a Character Continues through Sept. 11 at Low Brow Artique with:  Patch Whisky, Reno Msad, Chris Cortes, Royce Bannon, Plasmaslug, Shiro and more

Royce Bannon, Ride or Die

royce bannon character What a Character Continues through Sept. 11 at Low Brow Artique with:  Patch Whisky, Reno Msad, Chris Cortes, Royce Bannon, Plasmaslug, Shiro and more

PlasmaslugIntergalactic

Plasmaslug Intergalactic artwork What a Character Continues through Sept. 11 at Low Brow Artique with:  Patch Whisky, Reno Msad, Chris Cortes, Royce Bannon, Plasmaslug, Shiro and more

Shiro, Pillow

Shiro character What a Character Continues through Sept. 11 at Low Brow Artique with:  Patch Whisky, Reno Msad, Chris Cortes, Royce Bannon, Plasmaslug, Shiro and more

Also featured are works by Cern, Epic Uno, Marka 27, Sheryo and the Yok.  Low Brow Artique is located at 143 Central Avenue in Bushwick.

Photos of images by Dani Reyes Mozeson

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Under the curatorial direction of Tag Public Arts Project founder, SinXero, the walls on and off the 6 line in the South Central section of the Bronx have become one of the borough’s visual highlights.  Loved by both local residents and passersby, these murals, in fact, are now incorporated into an official tour of the Bronx. Here is a small sampling of what can be seen:

Marthalicia Matarrita and Raquel Echanique 

Raquel Echanique street art Bronx TAG Public Arts Project Adds Visual Intrigue to the Bronx with Marthalicia Matarrita, Raquel Echanique, Sexer, SinXero, See TF, Col, Werc, Daek William, Damien Mitchell, Chris Stain, Billy Mode and Zimad

Marthalicia Matarrita, close-up

Mathalicia Mattarita street art Bronx TAG Public Arts Project Adds Visual Intrigue to the Bronx with Marthalicia Matarrita, Raquel Echanique, Sexer, SinXero, See TF, Col, Werc, Daek William, Damien Mitchell, Chris Stain, Billy Mode and Zimad

Sexer

sexer graffiti Bronx NYC 2 TAG Public Arts Project Adds Visual Intrigue to the Bronx with Marthalicia Matarrita, Raquel Echanique, Sexer, SinXero, See TF, Col, Werc, Daek William, Damien Mitchell, Chris Stain, Billy Mode and Zimad

 SinXero

Sin Xero street art Bronx NYC TAG Public Arts Project Adds Visual Intrigue to the Bronx with Marthalicia Matarrita, Raquel Echanique, Sexer, SinXero, See TF, Col, Werc, Daek William, Damien Mitchell, Chris Stain, Billy Mode and Zimad

See TF

See TF street art Bronx NYC TAG Public Arts Project Adds Visual Intrigue to the Bronx with Marthalicia Matarrita, Raquel Echanique, Sexer, SinXero, See TF, Col, Werc, Daek William, Damien Mitchell, Chris Stain, Billy Mode and Zimad

Col Wallnuts

Col wallnuts street art graffiti Bronx TAG Public Arts Project Adds Visual Intrigue to the Bronx with Marthalicia Matarrita, Raquel Echanique, Sexer, SinXero, See TF, Col, Werc, Daek William, Damien Mitchell, Chris Stain, Billy Mode and Zimad

Werc

Werc street art Bronx NYC TAG Public Arts Project Adds Visual Intrigue to the Bronx with Marthalicia Matarrita, Raquel Echanique, Sexer, SinXero, See TF, Col, Werc, Daek William, Damien Mitchell, Chris Stain, Billy Mode and Zimad

Daek William – in from Australia 

Daek William street art Bronx NYC TAG Public Arts Project Adds Visual Intrigue to the Bronx with Marthalicia Matarrita, Raquel Echanique, Sexer, SinXero, See TF, Col, Werc, Daek William, Damien Mitchell, Chris Stain, Billy Mode and Zimad

Damien Mitchell

Damien Mitchell street art Bronx NYC TAG Public Arts Project Adds Visual Intrigue to the Bronx with Marthalicia Matarrita, Raquel Echanique, Sexer, SinXero, See TF, Col, Werc, Daek William, Damien Mitchell, Chris Stain, Billy Mode and Zimad

Billy Mode and Chris Stain

Billy Mode Chris Stain street art Bronx NYC TAG Public Arts Project Adds Visual Intrigue to the Bronx with Marthalicia Matarrita, Raquel Echanique, Sexer, SinXero, See TF, Col, Werc, Daek William, Damien Mitchell, Chris Stain, Billy Mode and Zimad

Zimad – close-up 

Zimad close up street art Bronx NYC TAG Public Arts Project Adds Visual Intrigue to the Bronx with Marthalicia Matarrita, Raquel Echanique, Sexer, SinXero, See TF, Col, Werc, Daek William, Damien Mitchell, Chris Stain, Billy Mode and Zimad

Keep posted to our Facebook page for many more Tag Public Arts Project images and check here for piece painted by the legendary John Matos aka Crash.

Photos by Lois Stavsky

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This is the third in a series of occasional posts featuring the range of creatures that share our streets with us:

Werc and Gera Luz in Gowanus, Brooklyn

Werc and Gera Luz street art Gowanus NYC A Feast of Beasts on NYC Streets, Part III:  Werc & Gera Luz, Ishmael, Kaffeine & Li Hill, Mr. Prvrt, IDT Crew, Kremen, Vers, KA and Hitnes

Ishmael at the Bushwick Collective

ismael Rivera Bushwick Collective A Feast of Beasts on NYC Streets, Part III:  Werc & Gera Luz, Ishmael, Kaffeine & Li Hill, Mr. Prvrt, IDT Crew, Kremen, Vers, KA and Hitnes

Kaffeine and Li Hill at the Bushwick Collective

Kaffeine and li hill street art Bushwick NYCNYC A Feast of Beasts on NYC Streets, Part III:  Werc & Gera Luz, Ishmael, Kaffeine & Li Hill, Mr. Prvrt, IDT Crew, Kremen, Vers, KA and Hitnes

Mr. Prvrt in Bushwick

mr prvrt street art nyc A Feast of Beasts on NYC Streets, Part III:  Werc & Gera Luz, Ishmael, Kaffeine & Li Hill, Mr. Prvrt, IDT Crew, Kremen, Vers, KA and Hitnes

IDT Crew in Williamsburg

IDT Crew williamsburg NYC A Feast of Beasts on NYC Streets, Part III:  Werc & Gera Luz, Ishmael, Kaffeine & Li Hill, Mr. Prvrt, IDT Crew, Kremen, Vers, KA and Hitnes

Kremen in Bushwick

Kremen street art Bushwick NYC A Feast of Beasts on NYC Streets, Part III:  Werc & Gera Luz, Ishmael, Kaffeine & Li Hill, Mr. Prvrt, IDT Crew, Kremen, Vers, KA and Hitnes

Vers in Bushwick

Vers street art NYC A Feast of Beasts on NYC Streets, Part III:  Werc & Gera Luz, Ishmael, Kaffeine & Li Hill, Mr. Prvrt, IDT Crew, Kremen, Vers, KA and Hitnes

KA in Bushwick

KA street art BushwickJPG A Feast of Beasts on NYC Streets, Part III:  Werc & Gera Luz, Ishmael, Kaffeine & Li Hill, Mr. Prvrt, IDT Crew, Kremen, Vers, KA and Hitnes

Hitnes at the Bushwick Collective

Hitnes street art Bushwick Collective NYC A Feast of Beasts on NYC Streets, Part III:  Werc & Gera Luz, Ishmael, Kaffeine & Li Hill, Mr. Prvrt, IDT Crew, Kremen, Vers, KA and Hitnes

Photos 1 – 3, 6 – 9 by Dani Reyes Mozeson; photo 4 by Tara Murray; photo 5 by Lois Stavsky

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ambi 67 mixed media art  BQE: Brooklyn Queens Elite Continues through Sunday at Dumbos PowerHouse Arena with: Ambi67, UR New York, Alice Mizrachi, KEL 5MH, David Cooper, Cernesto & more

Featuring the artwork of a dozen talented Brooklyn and Queens natives, BQE: Brooklyn Queens Elite continues through this Sunday, August 24th at Dumbo’s powerHouse Arena.  Here are a few more images from this exhibit curated by Queens native Yvette “Yvey” Hidalgo.

UR New York

U R New York on canvas  BQE: Brooklyn Queens Elite Continues through Sunday at Dumbos PowerHouse Arena with: Ambi67, UR New York, Alice Mizrachi, KEL 5MH, David Cooper, Cernesto & more

Alice Mizrachi

Alice Mizrachi portrait  BQE: Brooklyn Queens Elite Continues through Sunday at Dumbos PowerHouse Arena with: Ambi67, UR New York, Alice Mizrachi, KEL 5MH, David Cooper, Cernesto & more

KEL 5MH

Kel5MH  BQE: Brooklyn Queens Elite Continues through Sunday at Dumbos PowerHouse Arena with: Ambi67, UR New York, Alice Mizrachi, KEL 5MH, David Cooper, Cernesto & more

David Cooper

david cooper art on canvas  BQE: Brooklyn Queens Elite Continues through Sunday at Dumbos PowerHouse Arena with: Ambi67, UR New York, Alice Mizrachi, KEL 5MH, David Cooper, Cernesto & more

Cernesto

Cern at Powerhouse  BQE: Brooklyn Queens Elite Continues through Sunday at Dumbos PowerHouse Arena with: Ambi67, UR New York, Alice Mizrachi, KEL 5MH, David Cooper, Cernesto & more

Included, too, are works by Ernie Paniccioli, Greg Larmache, Olivia Jarowski-­Lovera, TooFly, Tommy Rebel and WRY TCK. The powerHouse Arena, also home to a wonderful bookstore and more, is located at 37 Main Street in Dumbo, Brooklyn.

The first image is a close-up from a mixed-media work by Ambi67. Photos of images by Dani Reyes Mozeson.

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Nic707 graffiti wildstyle on train InstaFame Phantom Art Brings Back Graffiti to NYC Trains with Nic707, Kingbee, Pulse, Yes One, Praxis, Meres and Tony164

The brainchild of veteran graffiti writer Nic707,  InstaFame Phantom Art continues to bring graffiti back to NYC trains — with artists from across the globe now contributing to this ingenious project. Here are a few images of artworks captured on the 1 and 6 lines:

The legendary Kingbee

King Bee graffiti in transit InstaFame Phantom Art Brings Back Graffiti to NYC Trains with Nic707, Kingbee, Pulse, Yes One, Praxis, Meres and Tony164

British graffiti pioneer Pulse

Pulse from London graffiti NYC InstaFame Phantom Art Brings Back Graffiti to NYC Trains with Nic707, Kingbee, Pulse, Yes One, Praxis, Meres and Tony164

Bronx native Yes One

Yes one graffiti subway NYC InstaFame Phantom Art Brings Back Graffiti to NYC Trains with Nic707, Kingbee, Pulse, Yes One, Praxis, Meres and Tony164

Bogota-based stencil artist Praxis

Praxis stencil art subway usa InstaFame Phantom Art Brings Back Graffiti to NYC Trains with Nic707, Kingbee, Pulse, Yes One, Praxis, Meres and Tony164

Style-master Meres — of 5Pointz fame

Meres graffiti instafame NYC InstaFame Phantom Art Brings Back Graffiti to NYC Trains with Nic707, Kingbee, Pulse, Yes One, Praxis, Meres and Tony164

Old School writer Tony164

Tony164 graffiti NYC transit InstaFame Phantom Art Brings Back Graffiti to NYC Trains with Nic707, Kingbee, Pulse, Yes One, Praxis, Meres and Tony164

And new from Nic707

Nic707 2014 graffiti InstaFame Phantom Art Brings Back Graffiti to NYC Trains with Nic707, Kingbee, Pulse, Yes One, Praxis, Meres and Tony164

Photos by Lois Stavsky 

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This is the eighth in a series of occasional posts featuring the diverse range of trucks and vans that strike our streets:

Erica

Erica graffiti truck NYC NYC’s Stylish Trucks & Vans, Part IX: Erica, Cern, Mast, Uta, Urban Animal, Gano and Zeso

Cern

cern on truck NYC NYC’s Stylish Trucks & Vans, Part IX: Erica, Cern, Mast, Uta, Urban Animal, Gano and Zeso

Mast

Mast graffiti on van NYC NYC’s Stylish Trucks & Vans, Part IX: Erica, Cern, Mast, Uta, Urban Animal, Gano and Zeso

Uta

uta graffiti truck NYC NYC’s Stylish Trucks & Vans, Part IX: Erica, Cern, Mast, Uta, Urban Animal, Gano and Zeso

Urban Animal

urban animal art truck NYC NYC’s Stylish Trucks & Vans, Part IX: Erica, Cern, Mast, Uta, Urban Animal, Gano and Zeso

Gano

gano graffiti truck NYC NYC’s Stylish Trucks & Vans, Part IX: Erica, Cern, Mast, Uta, Urban Animal, Gano and Zeso

Zeso

Zeso graffiti truck NYC 2 NYC’s Stylish Trucks & Vans, Part IX: Erica, Cern, Mast, Uta, Urban Animal, Gano and Zeso

 Photo credits:  1, 2 & 6, Tara Murray; 3, Dani Reyes Mozeson; 4 and 7, Lois Stavsky; 5. Sara C. Mozeson 

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