frank lexi Bella Kosbe the best of the worst Street Art Prankster Hanksy Brings <em>The Best of the Worst</em> to NYC: Frank Ape, Lexi Bella, Cosbe, Miss Zukie, CB23, Magda Love, Meres, Russell King, Col, UR New York, Mr. Toll, El Sol 25 and much more

The following guest post is by Houda Lazrak, a graduate student in Museum Studies at New York University.  

This past weekend, Hanksy’s much-anticipated show, The Best of the Worst, drew hundreds of street art fans to the former Chase Bank at 104 Delancey Street on Manhattan’s Lower East Side. Along with some of NYC’s most notable graffiti writers and street artists, Hanksy transformed the space into a NYC playground-like arena — with a skate ramp, a Chinese massage parlor and more wonderfully-engaging site-specific installations. Dozens of intriguing, overlapping pieces, paste-ups and stickers paid homage to street art, while, also, poking fun at the scene.

Miss Zukie

Miss Zukie  Street Art Prankster Hanksy Brings <em>The Best of the Worst</em> to NYC: Frank Ape, Lexi Bella, Cosbe, Miss Zukie, CB23, Magda Love, Meres, Russell King, Col, UR New York, Mr. Toll, El Sol 25 and much more

CB23 

CB23 Street Art Prankster Hanksy Brings <em>The Best of the Worst</em> to NYC: Frank Ape, Lexi Bella, Cosbe, Miss Zukie, CB23, Magda Love, Meres, Russell King, Col, UR New York, Mr. Toll, El Sol 25 and much more

Magda Love and Hanksy and more

Magda Love Street Art Prankster Hanksy Brings <em>The Best of the Worst</em> to NYC: Frank Ape, Lexi Bella, Cosbe, Miss Zukie, CB23, Magda Love, Meres, Russell King, Col, UR New York, Mr. Toll, El Sol 25 and much more

Meres and more

Meres the best of the worst Street Art Prankster Hanksy Brings <em>The Best of the Worst</em> to NYC: Frank Ape, Lexi Bella, Cosbe, Miss Zukie, CB23, Magda Love, Meres, Russell King, Col, UR New York, Mr. Toll, El Sol 25 and much more

Russell King, Col and UR New York

Russell King more Street Art Prankster Hanksy Brings <em>The Best of the Worst</em> to NYC: Frank Ape, Lexi Bella, Cosbe, Miss Zukie, CB23, Magda Love, Meres, Russell King, Col, UR New York, Mr. Toll, El Sol 25 and much more

Hanksy

Hanksy the best of the worst Street Art Prankster Hanksy Brings <em>The Best of the Worst</em> to NYC: Frank Ape, Lexi Bella, Cosbe, Miss Zukie, CB23, Magda Love, Meres, Russell King, Col, UR New York, Mr. Toll, El Sol 25 and much more

Included, too, was a rather formally installed art exhibit in the wittily-titled Gag-Osian Gallery featuring some of NYC’s most popular street artists.

Mr. Toll at the Gag-Osian

Mr toll Street Art Prankster Hanksy Brings <em>The Best of the Worst</em> to NYC: Frank Ape, Lexi Bella, Cosbe, Miss Zukie, CB23, Magda Love, Meres, Russell King, Col, UR New York, Mr. Toll, El Sol 25 and much more

El Sol 25 at the Gag-Osian

El Sol25 Street Art Prankster Hanksy Brings <em>The Best of the Worst</em> to NYC: Frank Ape, Lexi Bella, Cosbe, Miss Zukie, CB23, Magda Love, Meres, Russell King, Col, UR New York, Mr. Toll, El Sol 25 and much more

All photos by Houda Lazrak; pictured in the first photo are Frank Ape, Lexi Bella and Cosbe

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This is the ninth in a series of occasional posts featuring the range of faces that surface on NYC open spaces:

James Bullough at the Bushwick Collective

James Bullough street art Bushwick Collective NYC Faces in NYC Public Spaces, Part IX: James Bullough, Alan Aine, Vexta, Zimad, Anser, Sam Kirk and Rafael de los Santos

Alan Aine in Bedford-Stuyvesant

alan aine street art bed stuy Faces in NYC Public Spaces, Part IX: James Bullough, Alan Aine, Vexta, Zimad, Anser, Sam Kirk and Rafael de los Santos

Vexta in the East Village

vexta east village street art nyc Faces in NYC Public Spaces, Part IX: James Bullough, Alan Aine, Vexta, Zimad, Anser, Sam Kirk and Rafael de los Santos

Zimad at the Bushwick Collective

zimad street art nyc Faces in NYC Public Spaces, Part IX: James Bullough, Alan Aine, Vexta, Zimad, Anser, Sam Kirk and Rafael de los Santos

Anser in Bushwick

anser street art bushwick nyc Faces in NYC Public Spaces, Part IX: James Bullough, Alan Aine, Vexta, Zimad, Anser, Sam Kirk and Rafael de los Santos

Sam Kirk in Williamsburg

provoke culture street art nyc Faces in NYC Public Spaces, Part IX: James Bullough, Alan Aine, Vexta, Zimad, Anser, Sam Kirk and Rafael de los Santos

Rafael de los Santos aka Poteleche in Williamsburg

HD Crew Street art nyc Faces in NYC Public Spaces, Part IX: James Bullough, Alan Aine, Vexta, Zimad, Anser, Sam Kirk and Rafael de los Santos

Photo credits: 1 & 3. Tara Murray; 2, 4, 6 & 7 Lois Stavsky; 5. Dani Reyes Mozeson

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Speaking with Mor

March 26, 2015

For the past several years, Mor‘s exquisitely-fashioned stencils have been surfacing on the streets of NYC and beyond. I had the opportunity to speak to Mor earlier this week at Con Artist, where she was preparing for tomorrow’s opening at City Bird Gallery.

Mor with stencil con artist Speaking with Mor

When did you first get up on the streets? What was your medium at the time?

I started almost five years ago with hand-made stickers. And the following year, I pasted up my first one-layer stencil – a face looking upward — in Williamsburg.

What inspired you to work with stencils?

When I was in middle school, I was living in Bushwick — in its early stages of gentrification. I remember passing Swoon’s work on my way to school. Its beauty astounded me. She is my greatest inspiration. And C215’s amazing work – that surfaced in Brooklyn back then — also moved me to experiment with stencils.

What about the streets? What was the appeal of the streets to you?

I love the notion of creating something beautiful and just giving it to others.

mor stencil art Lower East Side NYC Speaking with Mor

Were you ever arrested back then?

I was once caught tagging with a black marker, and I ended up spending the night in jail. It is a risk that all street artists take.

How did your family feel about what you were doing?

They were positive, encouraging me to do what makes me happy

Do you have a formal arts education?

I am, for the most part, self-taught.  But my art teachers always encouraged me.

Mor street art nyc Speaking with Mor

Any thoughts on the graffiti street art divide?

There definitely is a divide, and there will always be some kind of beef between graffiti writers and street artists. It’s not cool when a street artist goes over graffiti. Nor is it cool when a writer tags over street art.  But I think the media – particularly the Internet – is partly responsible for the beef.

How do you feel about the role of the Internet in this scene?

It has definitely changed the playing field!  It’s great that it gives permanence to a transient art form. But — on the negative side — it boosts a type of showmanship, while giving exposure to mediocre artwork.

What inspires you these days?

Much of my inspiration comes from my dreams. I’m also into mysticism.

Mor stencil street art in Bushwick NYC Speaking with Mor

Are there any particular cultures that have influenced your aesthetic?

Tribal ones have the most influence.

Have you collaborated with other artists? 

I haven’t in the past, but I will be painting with Ian Bertram at City Bird in preparation for our joint exhibit.

How do you feel about the movement of street art and graffiti into galleries? 

As my father is an artist, I grew up around galleries. I do think, though, that there is something sterile about galleries as compared to public spaces.  Showing in a gallery is very different from getting up on the streets.  And I don’t feel that the art world understands art — not just street art, any art!

Mor stencil art Centre fuge East Village NYC Speaking with Mor

How has your work evolved in the past few years? 

The streets have energized me to keep pushing myself. I feel that I’ve grown so much in just finding my process.

Have you any preferred surfaces when you are out on the streets?

I love brick walls — the way art ages on brick walls. And I like smooth doors because they’re easy to use.

How would you describe your ideal working space?

At the moment I have my ideal working space — here at Con Artist.  I love my Con Artist family. But I can imagine some day sharing a huge space with the extraordinarily talented Ian Bertram, a constant source of inspiration!

Ian Bertram art Speaking with Mor

What percentage of your time is devoted to art?

As much time as I possibly can — when I’m not dealing with family responsibilities or bartending, my main source of income.

Any thoughts about the marketing of graffiti by the corporate world?

We all know that the corporate world is filled with scoundrels and pirates, but we also know that as artists, we need its financial support.

What do you see as the role of the artist in society?

It is the artist’s role to channel deeply seated emotions and creativity in a positive way. It is an essential role.

Mor stencil art skate boards Speaking with Mor

What do you see as the future of street art?

I have no idea where it’s going. There’s been too much hype around street art.  But graffiti will always sustain. Someone will always be writing his or her name on a wall.

What’s ahead for you?

I just want to continue to channel my creativity into living a productive life as an artist, while engaging and, hopefully, enriching others.  Tomorrow night I will be showing my newest pieces, alongside Ian Bertram, at City Bird Gallery.

Ian Bertram and Mor City Bird Gallery Speaking with Mor

 Congratulations! That sounds great!

Photos: 1 and 7 City-as-School intern Zachariah Messaoud; 2, 4 and 5 Lois Stavsky; 3  Sara C. Mozeson & 6 Ian Bertram

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Living and working as a full-time artist in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, Milan native Federico Massa aka Iena Cruz first visited NYC in 2008. He has since moved here, enhancing NYC and beyond with his strikingly stylish aesthetic. This post is the first in a new series of interviews with artists born abroad who have decided to make NYC home.

iena cruz painting miami auction Federico Massa aka Iena Cruz: From Milan, Italy to Williamsburg, Bklyn

When did you first visit NYC?

It was the summer of 2008. I stayed here for a month.  At the time, I didn’t know anyone in NYC.

What brought you here? Why NYC?

I was on vacation, and I was interested in exploring other cities. I had begun to feel that Milan is too small for me.  NYC seemed like a logical place to visit.

Iena Cruz in studio Federico Massa aka Iena Cruz: From Milan, Italy to Williamsburg, Bklyn

What was your first impression of NYC?

I fell in love with it at once.  I didn’t understand it, but I loved it. I felt inspired by the chance to be connected to so many different cultures. I thought everything about NYC is great!

What was your image of NYC back in Milan?

It was out of focus. The only image I had of it came from what I saw in movies and music videos. I really had no idea what to expect.

Iena Cruz street art williamsburg NYC Federico Massa aka Iena Cruz: From Milan, Italy to Williamsburg, Bklyn

When did you decide to return here? 

I knew soon after my first visit that I needed to come back.

How did your family feel about you leaving Milan for NYC?

They were supportive. They know how difficult life is for an artist in Milan. Back home no artist is taken seriously until after he is past 50.

iena cruz puerto rico street art Federico Massa aka Iena Cruz: From Milan, Italy to Williamsburg, Bklyn

What were some of the challenges you faced once you decided to make NYC home?

I had to learn a new language. I had to find work to meet basic living expenses. I constantly had to concern myself with visa requirements and paper work. And in order to do all this, I had to put aside my painting. There was a general sense of instability.

Your current living situation is ideal – as your home is also your studio. How did you get so lucky?

I discovered this place on craigslist. When I contacted the owner, he asked me to show him a sample of my artwork! As soon as he saw it, he took me on as a tenant. At the time there were two other artists living here, both Mexican.

Iena Cruz bushwick street art Federico Massa aka Iena Cruz: From Milan, Italy to Williamsburg, Bklyn

What was that like – sharing the space with these other artists?

It was wonderful at the time! And they’ve had a tremendous influence on my aesthetic. Through them, I discovered Mexican culture, and I’ve since adapted elements of it into my artworks.

Now that the space is all yours, how do you meet all your expenses?

Largely through a variety of commissioned projects. I also sell artworks and do set design.

iena cruz street art NYC Federico Massa aka Iena Cruz: From Milan, Italy to Williamsburg, Bklyn

Do any particular projects stand out?

The huge mural I did for the Williamsburg Cinemas on the corner of Grand and Driggs was an experience! It was unlike anything I had done before – both aesthetically and in terms of the people with whom I interacted while painting it.  And last month, I had the opportunity to participate in FAAM, Fine Art Auction Miami in Wynwood.

How has your artwork evolved or changed since you came here?

My current works feature and fuse elements of Italy, Mexico and NYC.  And as I’m inspired to push myself here, my art is certain to continue to evolve and develop.

Cruz close up street art Williamsburg nyc Federico Massa aka Iena Cruz: From Milan, Italy to Williamsburg, Bklyn

How receptive have New Yorkers been to your artwork? To you?

It’s been so positive. My sense is that folks here admire my work, and they’ve been so welcoming.

What’s ahead?

Now that I have my green card, I just want to keep painting murals and exhibiting my artwork.

Interview by Lois Stavsky with City-as-School intern Zachariah Messaoud  

Photos: 1. In Miami for the FAAM MAJOR STREET ART AUCTION and 4. In Puerto Rico, courtesy of the artist; 2. In the artist’s studio, Lois Stavsky; and 3, 5-7, In NYC, Dani Reyes Mozeson

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The first day of spring 2015 brought wintry snow to NYC. Here are a few images I captured while in Greenpoint for the day:

 Phetus

phetus greenpoint Back to Greenpoint on a Snowy First Day of Spring with Phetus, Matthew Denton Burrows, Cern, Faring Purth, Shiro, Yes One, Tone. Miro & more

Matthew Denton Burrows

matthew denton burrows street art nyc Back to Greenpoint on a Snowy First Day of Spring with Phetus, Matthew Denton Burrows, Cern, Faring Purth, Shiro, Yes One, Tone. Miro & more

Cern

Cern street art greenpoint Brooklyn NYC Back to Greenpoint on a Snowy First Day of Spring with Phetus, Matthew Denton Burrows, Cern, Faring Purth, Shiro, Yes One, Tone. Miro & more

Tone

tone greenpoint Back to Greenpoint on a Snowy First Day of Spring with Phetus, Matthew Denton Burrows, Cern, Faring Purth, Shiro, Yes One, Tone. Miro & more

 Faring Purth

Farin Purth greenpoint NYC Back to Greenpoint on a Snowy First Day of Spring with Phetus, Matthew Denton Burrows, Cern, Faring Purth, Shiro, Yes One, Tone. Miro & more

ShiroYes One and Tone MST

shiro yes1 tone graffiti greenpoint nyc Back to Greenpoint on a Snowy First Day of Spring with Phetus, Matthew Denton Burrows, Cern, Faring Purth, Shiro, Yes One, Tone. Miro & more

To be identified

greenpoint graffiti nyc Back to Greenpoint on a Snowy First Day of Spring with Phetus, Matthew Denton Burrows, Cern, Faring Purth, Shiro, Yes One, Tone. Miro & more

 Miro RIS (& Shiro, top right)

Miro graffiti Greenpoint nyc Back to Greenpoint on a Snowy First Day of Spring with Phetus, Matthew Denton Burrows, Cern, Faring Purth, Shiro, Yes One, Tone. Miro & more 

Photos by Lois Stavsky

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Royce Bannon Kerren Hasson Fishing Buddies art Royce Bannon on Living the After Life at 17 Frost

On exhibit through tomorrow — Saturday — evening at 17 Frost is Royce Bannon‘s Living the After Life.  Fashioned on a range of found surfaces — some collaboratively — all of the images intrigue. Curious as to what is going on, I posed some questions to Royce.

What does this all mean? What is going on here?

These works represent my ideal vision of the afterlife — doing the things that I enjoy doing — when I am living as a ghost. It is a celebration of life after death.

Royce Bannon KA art 17 Frost Royce Bannon on Living the After Life at 17 Frost

Royce Bannon Afterlife Royce Bannon on Living the After Life at 17 Frost

 What, do you suppose, was the impetus behind this theme? Why the focus on life after death?

My mother recently died. For quite awhile I’d been preparing myself for her death and thinking about the afterlife. Death is not the end.

Royce Bannon Only Positive Thoughts Royce Bannon on Living the After Life at 17 Frost

How have folks responded to this body of work? 

The response has been positive. There’s been considerable interest in the works.

Royce Bannon Observer Obscuraart Frost Royce Bannon on Living the After Life at 17 Frost

How can folks to be sure see the exhibit before it closes?

Everyone is invited to the closing party to be held tomorrow evening — Saturday, March 21 — at 17 Frost Street from 7-11pm.

living the after life party invite Royce Bannon on Living the After Life at 17 Frost

Note: Tomorrow evening’s closing party will feature a new collabo with EKG and a live drum machine performance by Jefferson Wells.

Images

1. Fishing buddies, Collab with Keren Hasson, Acrylic on wood

2. The swing is always broken in limbo, Collab with KA, Acrylic and spray paint on metal.

3. Remember that day, pt 2, Acrylic on wood

4. Only positive thoughts, Acrylic on metal

5. So far, Collab with Observer Obscura, Mixed media on wood

Photos of artworks by Lois Stavsky

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While in L.A. earlier this week to celebrate the expansion of the Google Cultural Institute’s Street Art Project, Houda Lazrak  – co-curator of the Bushwick Collective online exhibit and the earlier 5Pointz one – had the opportunity to check out the neighboring streets. Here’s a sampling of what she found:

Beau Stanton

beau stanton street art LA Street Art NYC in L.A. with: Beau Stanton, Pixel Pancho, Fin DAC & Christina Angelina, Lady Aiko, Hueman and Roa

Pixel Pancho

Pixel Pancho street art LA Street Art NYC in L.A. with: Beau Stanton, Pixel Pancho, Fin DAC & Christina Angelina, Lady Aiko, Hueman and Roa

Fin DAC and Christina Angelina

Fin DAC Angelina Christina street art LA Street Art NYC in L.A. with: Beau Stanton, Pixel Pancho, Fin DAC & Christina Angelina, Lady Aiko, Hueman and Roa

Lady Aiko

Lady Aiko street art LA Street Art NYC in L.A. with: Beau Stanton, Pixel Pancho, Fin DAC & Christina Angelina, Lady Aiko, Hueman and Roa

Hueman

Hueman close up LA Street Art NYC in L.A. with: Beau Stanton, Pixel Pancho, Fin DAC & Christina Angelina, Lady Aiko, Hueman and Roa

Roa

Roa street art LA  Street Art NYC in L.A. with: Beau Stanton, Pixel Pancho, Fin DAC & Christina Angelina, Lady Aiko, Hueman and Roa

Photos by Houda Lazrak

Note: Houda Lazrak, a graduate student in Museum Studies at New York University, is a frequent contributor to StreetArtNYC and co-curator of the Bushwick Collective and 5Pointz on-line exhibits for the Google Cultural Institute’s Street Art Project.

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Home to three distinct galleries – Artemisia GalleryAzart Gallery and MZ Urban Art – Chelsea 27 is currently presenting Spring Group Show featuring works by an eclectic range of emerging and established international artists. While visiting the gallery yesterday, we had the opportunity to speak to Marina Hadley, owner of MZ Urban Art.

pez azart <em>Spring Group Show</em> at Chelsea 27: El Pez, Kokian, Sliks, Sen2, Esther Barend, Kurar, Joyce DiBona and more

Can you tell us something about Chelsea 27?  This current exhibit features artworks presented by three distinct galleries, yet the pieces seem to seamlessly work together. 

We are three friends. I had previously worked with Latifa Metheny, the owner of Azart Gallery, at 547 West 27th Street, and I met Christine Jeanquier, who runs Artemisia Gallery, through a mutual friend.  We respect each other’s visions and choices.

kokian artwork artemisia <em>Spring Group Show</em> at Chelsea 27: El Pez, Kokian, Sliks, Sen2, Esther Barend, Kurar, Joyce DiBona and more

You seem to all share a somewhat similar vision. 

Yes, we are interested in showcasing emerging and contemporary artists — who are working in a range of media and styles – from across the globe. We are interested, too, in discovering new talents. Latifa Metheny particularly focuses on the culture of street art and Christine Jeanquier on French artists.

sliks abstract art chelsea27 <em>Spring Group Show</em> at Chelsea 27: El Pez, Kokian, Sliks, Sen2, Esther Barend, Kurar, Joyce DiBona and more

 Why did you choose this particular location?

It is on the ground level of an ideal space in the heart of the Chelsea art district. It was a step I was ready to take, as it is the perfect location for attracting serious collectors.

sen2 azart galllery <em>Spring Group Show</em> at Chelsea 27: El Pez, Kokian, Sliks, Sen2, Esther Barend, Kurar, Joyce DiBona and more

Yes, it does seem perfect! What advice would you offer an emerging artist who would like to see his work featured in a Chelsea gallery?

Before approaching a gallery, get to know its owner and the work that it features. That is how you will know if the gallery is likely to be receptive to your work. Be sure to have a professional-looking website with each image labeled with its size and medium. When visiting a gallery, bring business cards and a cover letter that look professional. Check out — as often as possible — what other artists are doing. Work hard and be persistent! And be sure to have a body of work and a recognizable style before approaching a gallery owner.

Esther Barand <em>Spring Group Show</em> at Chelsea 27: El Pez, Kokian, Sliks, Sen2, Esther Barend, Kurar, Joyce DiBona and more

That certainly sounds like great advice! Is there anything in particular that you, yourself, look for in an artist?

Yes, I look for someone who has a statement to make and is willing to take risks to make it. I develop a personal relationship with each artist whose works I exhibit.

kurar stencil artist artemisa <em>Spring Group Show</em> at Chelsea 27: El Pez, Kokian, Sliks, Sen2, Esther Barend, Kurar, Joyce DiBona and more

So much is happening in the contemporary art scene. How do you keep up with it all?

I follow social media sites like Facebook and Twitter. I regularly read the New York Times, the London Times and the LA Times. I read essential blogs and I talk to people.

Joyce DiBona MZ Urban Art <em>Spring Group Show</em> at Chelsea 27: El Pez, Kokian, Sliks, Sen2, Esther Barend, Kurar, Joyce DiBona and more

We’re looking forward to upcoming exhibits and events, and we are delighted that Chelsea 27 is showcasing so many artists who are active on our streets.

Note:  The exhibit continues through Saturday, March 21.

 Artworks

1. El Pez 

2. Kokian

3. Sliks

4. Sen2

5. Esther Barend, close-up

6. Kurar

7. Joyce DiBona

Interview by Lois Stavsky with City-as-School intern Zachariah Messaoud

Photo credits: 1, 2, 5 & 6 City-as-School intern Zachariah Messaoud; 3 & 7 Lois Stavsky and 4 Dani Reyes Mozeson

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Betso Mickey Splash PIQ <em>Twisted Mouse</em> at Grand Centrals PIQ Pays Homage to Mickey Mouse: Betso, Eric Orr, Sienide, Miss Zukie, Chris RWK and more

An extraordinary range of artworks in various media celebrating the iconic Mickey Mouse is currently on exhibit at PIQ at 8 Grand Central Terminal in the Shuttle Passage. Among the artists featured in Twisted Mouse are many who also grace the streets of our cities. I recently had the opportunity to speak to its curator, Sabina Nowik.

Can you tell us something about this exhibit? What is happening here?

It is a celebration of Mickey Mouse with dozens of works ranging from the quirky to the gruesome.

Eric orr Mickey Mouse PIQ <em>Twisted Mouse</em> at Grand Centrals PIQ Pays Homage to Mickey Mouse: Betso, Eric Orr, Sienide, Miss Zukie, Chris RWK and more

Why Mickey Mouse? What is his significance to you?

Having lived and worked in Orlando, Florida, I’ve always had a special relationship with Disney’s characters. Mickey Mouse represents youth and fun!

sienide artwork Mickey Mouse PIQ <em>Twisted Mouse</em> at Grand Centrals PIQ Pays Homage to Mickey Mouse: Betso, Eric Orr, Sienide, Miss Zukie, Chris RWK and more

How did you bring such an extraordinary array of artists together? How did you find them all?

I knew some of the artists from the previous exhibit here at PIQ; some I discovered via word-of-mouth. And I did considerable online research.

Miss Zukie Mickey PIQ <em>Twisted Mouse</em> at Grand Centrals PIQ Pays Homage to Mickey Mouse: Betso, Eric Orr, Sienide, Miss Zukie, Chris RWK and more

What was the experience like? Was it different from what you had expected?

It was very pleasant, as I had expected it to be. But the installation itself — incorporating everything from soft vinyl to triptych art — came together far more seamlessly than I had anticipated.

chris rwk art piq <em>Twisted Mouse</em> at Grand Centrals PIQ Pays Homage to Mickey Mouse: Betso, Eric Orr, Sienide, Miss Zukie, Chris RWK and more

Note: Twisted Mouse continues through March, with many artworks to remain on exhibit through April. Hours: Monday-Thursday: 8-10 | Friday 8-11 | Saturday: 8-10 | Sunday 9-9.

Artworks

1. Betso, Mickey Splash

2. Eric Orr, Max with Mickey Ears

3. Sienide, Wickey Mouse

4. Miss Zukie, Stuffed Mouse

5. Chris RWK, Tourist Trap

Photo credits: 1 Sara C. Mozeson; 2 – 4 Lois Stavsky and 5 courtesy of the artist

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Andre downtown Manhattan NYC street art Curious Characters on NYC Streets, Part VI: André, Bradley Theodore, Kashink, Dasic & Spok Briller, RRobots, See One, Rob Plater, Nepo & Son

This is the sixth in a series of occasional posts featuring the range of curious characters that have made their way onto NYC open spaces:

French artist André in Downtown Manhattan

andre. street art nyc Curious Characters on NYC Streets, Part VI: André, Bradley Theodore, Kashink, Dasic & Spok Briller, RRobots, See One, Rob Plater, Nepo & Son

Bradley Theodore in SoHo

Bradley theodore street art nyc Curious Characters on NYC Streets, Part VI: André, Bradley Theodore, Kashink, Dasic & Spok Briller, RRobots, See One, Rob Plater, Nepo & Son

French artist Kashink in Bushwick 

Kashink street art nyc Curious Characters on NYC Streets, Part VI: André, Bradley Theodore, Kashink, Dasic & Spok Briller, RRobots, See One, Rob Plater, Nepo & Son

Dasic and Spanish artist Spok Briller at the Bushwick Collective

Dasic spok brillor street art Curious Characters on NYC Streets, Part VI: André, Bradley Theodore, Kashink, Dasic & Spok Briller, RRobots, See One, Rob Plater, Nepo & Son

 Nick Kuszyk aka RRobots in Williamsburg

RRobot street art nyc Curious Characters on NYC Streets, Part VI: André, Bradley Theodore, Kashink, Dasic & Spok Briller, RRobots, See One, Rob Plater, Nepo & Son

See One at the Bushwick Collective

see one street art NYC Curious Characters on NYC Streets, Part VI: André, Bradley Theodore, Kashink, Dasic & Spok Briller, RRobots, See One, Rob Plater, Nepo & Son

Robert Plater for JMZ Walls

Robert plater Curious Characters on NYC Streets, Part VI: André, Bradley Theodore, Kashink, Dasic & Spok Briller, RRobots, See One, Rob Plater, Nepo & Son

Puerto Rican artists Nepo and Son in Bushwick for this past summer’s Juicy Art Fest

Nepo son street art Curious Characters on NYC Streets, Part VI: André, Bradley Theodore, Kashink, Dasic & Spok Briller, RRobots, See One, Rob Plater, Nepo & Son

Photos: 1, 2, 5-7 & 9  Lois Stavsky; 3 Dani Reyes Mozeson; 4 & 8 Tara Murray

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