Lady Aiko Lady Aikos Playful Bunny Party at Red Hooks Gallery Brooklyn with Closing Party Next Saturday, March 29

With a range of stencil artwork on different media — from a skateboard deck to cupboard doors — along with a a playfully seductive mural, Lady Aiko has transformed Red Hook’s Gallery Brooklyn into a magical bunny party. This is a sampling of what can be seen at 351 Van Brundt Avenue through next Saturday.

Kiss

Lady Aiko stencil art kiss Lady Aikos Playful Bunny Party at Red Hooks Gallery Brooklyn with Closing Party Next Saturday, March 29

It’s Over

Lady Aiko bunny party Its Over stencil art Lady Aikos Playful Bunny Party at Red Hooks Gallery Brooklyn with Closing Party Next Saturday, March 29

Serious Romance, close-up

Lady Aiko stencil art Serious Romance Lady Aikos Playful Bunny Party at Red Hooks Gallery Brooklyn with Closing Party Next Saturday, March 29

Linda

Lady Aiko stencil art Linda Lady Aikos Playful Bunny Party at Red Hooks Gallery Brooklyn with Closing Party Next Saturday, March 29

And close-up from huge mural

Lady Aiko Gallery brooklyn Mural Lady Aikos Playful Bunny Party at Red Hooks Gallery Brooklyn with Closing Party Next Saturday, March 29

The exhibit is open Thursday through Saturday, 12-7 and Sunday 12-5. The closing party takes place next Saturday evening, March 29, from 6-10 pm.

Photos of artwork by Lois Stavsky and City-as-School intern Annie Loucka 

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Cern art Piece  Robert Aloia Brings His Curatorial Vision to shny with Cern, Matthew Denton Burrows, Icy and Sot, Leah Weber, Leo Uzai and many more

Piece, a wonderfully eclectic exhibit featuring a range of artworks from sketches to completed pieces, remains on exhibit at Spreadhouse through March 28 at 116 Suffolk Street on Manhattan’s Lower East Side. While most of the artists are familiar to us street art aficionados, some simply have a distinctly urban or outsider sensibility. Curious as to what was going on here, I posed some questions to Robert Aloia who spearheaded the show.

This is a great venue here. Can you tell us something about it?

It is an all-around creative space launched by the film production company, Spreadhouse, aka shny.

Matthew Denton Burrows  Robert Aloia Brings His Curatorial Vision to shny with Cern, Matthew Denton Burrows, Icy and Sot, Leah Weber, Leo Uzai and many more

How did you discover it? It’s the perfect space to showcase art and its location is ideal.

My friend, the artist Peter Passuntino, had an exhibit here last month, curated by his son Greg. It was the first art show at shny and it introduced me to this space.

Icy and Sot stencil art piece  Robert Aloia Brings His Curatorial Vision to shny with Cern, Matthew Denton Burrows, Icy and Sot, Leah Weber, Leo Uzai and many more

What is the concept behind Piece?

This exhibit is my way to showcase this space at Spreadhouse and to give viewers a glimpse into the creative process – from inspiration to finished product. Many of the pieces were created right here!

Leah Weber artwork  Robert Aloia Brings His Curatorial Vision to shny with Cern, Matthew Denton Burrows, Icy and Sot, Leah Weber, Leo Uzai and many more

Among the dozens of artists featured here are many who are active on the streets and others who are new to me. How did you hook up with so many talented folks?

Friends and friends of friends and assistant curators.

Leo Uzai  Robert Aloia Brings His Curatorial Vision to shny with Cern, Matthew Denton Burrows, Icy and Sot, Leah Weber, Leo Uzai and many more

What’s ahead?

We’re at work on a number of wide-ranging exhibits. But you can expect to see some street art elements in all of them.

That sounds great. Good luck!

Images: 1. Cern  2. Matthew Denton Burrows  3. Icy and Sot  4. Leah Weber and 5. Leo Uzai

Photos of images by Lois Stavsky

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This is the fourth in an occasional series featuring images of New York City’s doors that sport everything from tags and stickers to sophisticated images.

Ewok in Williamsburg, Brooklyn

ewok street art on door NYC NYC’s Expressive Doors, Part IV:  Ewok, Mor, David Shillinglaw, Jordan Betten, Stikki Peaches, Alice Mizrachi, Jerkface, LMNOP and Ludo

Mor in Downtown Manhattan

Mor stencil art NYC 2 NYC’s Expressive Doors, Part IV:  Ewok, Mor, David Shillinglaw, Jordan Betten, Stikki Peaches, Alice Mizrachi, Jerkface, LMNOP and Ludo

Long-running David Shillinglaw in Williamsburg, Brooklyn

David Shillinglaw street art NYC NYC’s Expressive Doors, Part IV:  Ewok, Mor, David Shillinglaw, Jordan Betten, Stikki Peaches, Alice Mizrachi, Jerkface, LMNOP and Ludo

Stikki Peaches in Williamsburg, Brooklyn

stikki peaches street art nyc NYC’s Expressive Doors, Part IV:  Ewok, Mor, David Shillinglaw, Jordan Betten, Stikki Peaches, Alice Mizrachi, Jerkface, LMNOP and Ludo

Jordan Betten in Chelsea

Jordan Betten street art NYC NYC’s Expressive Doors, Part IV:  Ewok, Mor, David Shillinglaw, Jordan Betten, Stikki Peaches, Alice Mizrachi, Jerkface, LMNOP and Ludo

Alice Mizrachi aka AM in abandoned East Village building

alice door NYC’s Expressive Doors, Part IV:  Ewok, Mor, David Shillinglaw, Jordan Betten, Stikki Peaches, Alice Mizrachi, Jerkface, LMNOP and Ludo

Jerkface in Little Italy

jerk face NoLita NYC’s Expressive Doors, Part IV:  Ewok, Mor, David Shillinglaw, Jordan Betten, Stikki Peaches, Alice Mizrachi, Jerkface, LMNOP and Ludo

LMNOP in Bushwick, Brooklyn

LMNBOP street art Bushwick NYC’s Expressive Doors, Part IV:  Ewok, Mor, David Shillinglaw, Jordan Betten, Stikki Peaches, Alice Mizrachi, Jerkface, LMNOP and Ludo

Ludo in Little Italy

Ludo on door NYC’s Expressive Doors, Part IV:  Ewok, Mor, David Shillinglaw, Jordan Betten, Stikki Peaches, Alice Mizrachi, Jerkface, LMNOP and Ludo

Photos of  Mor, Jordan Betten, Alice Mizrachi, Jerkface and Ludo by Dani Reyes Mozeson; of Stikki Peaches by Emily Robertson; of Ewok, David Shillinglaw and LMNOP by Lois Stavsky

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BackgroundNoise1 Roycer  Bomarr Presents the Background Noise Podcast Series with Roycer, RAE, Enzo & Nio, OverUnder, Tony Depew, Futura and more

Do you ever wonder what music your favorite street artists listen to?   Well, Bomarr has the answer!  And in addition to presenting first-rate podcasts that share this music with us, the Bomarr Blog also features brief interviews with these artists and selections from their artworks. We love what Matt is doing and recently posed some questions to him:

Tell us something about yourself – your background.  

I grew up in a small town in New Hampshire.  When I was 21, I moved to Oakland to put out records and tour with my friends on a label called Anticon.  We were a very art-focused group of creative and inspiring people. After spending 10 years in the Bay Area, I moved with my now-wife back to the East Coast and have been in NYC ever since.

What spurred this project?

The Background Noise project grew out of my interest in the New York art world. Initially, it was going to solely focus on NYC-based street artists. The NYC art scene in particular has a completely different energy and feel than the Bay Area one, and I sensed it as soon as I landed here. Don’t get me wrong!  There’s some great art out there in galleries and on the streets, but again, just a completely different feel.  I had seen a few ASVP wheatpastes in San Francisco before I moved, but when I got here, I saw them all over the place, and they seemed to make more sense here. Soon after, I discovered Jim Joe and started, with two friends, a Jim Joe-dedicated site called Cult of Joe, which is now just an Instagram account that I maintain (@cultofjoe) .  It was this general interest in what was going on, and a curiosity I had about what sort of music gets the creative juices flowing for artists whose work I enjoy that really started the project.

RAE Background Noise  Bomarr Presents the Background Noise Podcast Series with Roycer, RAE, Enzo & Nio, OverUnder, Tony Depew, Futura and more

How do you decide which artists to interview? 

It pretty much comes down to people whose work I personally am drawn to and have some sort of respect for. Whether it’s a legend like Futura or the guy who writes Spring Break everywhere, it’s all stuff that I like. It can be mindblowing art, political, or humor-based. It’s all art to me, and if it’s something that sparks my curiousity, I will try to reach out to them to see if they’re interested.

How have the artists responded to this project?

Everyone has responded with great enthusiasm so far. I think what helps is that I’m providing yet another way for these artists to express themselves, which is what artists do.  So when given another avenue to do this, they often jump on it right away.  Some take longer than others, but they always come through. It’s also great for the artists who have maintained anonymity for quite some time. This still allows them to remain anonymous. I’m not meeting up with them in person, talking to them on the phone, or anything like that. It stays strictly through email, so I think the feeling of safety has really allowed people to be willing to participate. I’ve met quite a few of these people since starting the project because I think it’s built a bit of trust, which is great.  But if I never meet some of these people, I’m completely fine with that.

Enzo Nio Background Noise1  Bomarr Presents the Background Noise Podcast Series with Roycer, RAE, Enzo & Nio, OverUnder, Tony Depew, Futura and more

 Have any particular responses to your questions surprised you?

I think the only response that has surprised me so far is one from last week’s Futura episode, where I asked him how important he thinks music is to his creative process.  I was surprised when he, a legend — who has appeared on a Clash song, recorded music himself, and worked with musical artists such as UNKLE — replied, “Not that important.”  But, we all get inspiration in different ways. He has great taste in music, regardless.

Who are some of the other artists you’d like to interview?

I have a laundry list. There are a few I’m actively trying to get, to the point where I might be annoying them. And some of them are long shots, but my wishlist in no particular order: Judith Supine, Jim Joe, ASVP, Paul Insect, Ron English, Neckface, Erik Yahnker, How & Nosm, Icy and Sot,  Sheryo + The Yok, Adam Wallacavage, Skullphone, Raymond Pettibon, Cameron Gray, Asger Carlsen, ElSol25, Douglas Kolk, Swampy, David Shrigley, Stinkfish, Theo Rosenblum, Maurizio Cattelan, Trustocorp, Olek, Jean-Paul Malozzi, Faile.  If anyone can help me out with any of these, please message me!

OverUnder Background Noise  Bomarr Presents the Background Noise Podcast Series with Roycer, RAE, Enzo & Nio, OverUnder, Tony Depew, Futura and more

What kind of music do you like to listen to?

I literally listen to it all. I’m a bit fan of 80’s synths, whether it’s synth pop or obscure minimal synth music — Gary Numan/Tubeway Army, all that stuff.  I love 60s psych rock, hip hop, metal, John Fahey, Fennesz….I’m all over the map.

What do you think of New York City’s current street art scene? 

I think it’s great! It’s really starting to gain some momentum too lately. Maybe I wasn’t as in tune with it a couple of years ago, but it seems like there’s a lot going on right now. It’s great seeing things like Hanksy’s Surplus Candy show, another Jim Joe solo show at the Hole, all these shows that Royce Bannon is curating, the Yoav Litvin Outdoor Gallery book. The New York City current street art scene is really bustling, and I think people are going to start to notice even more very soon.

Tony Depew Background Noise1  Bomarr Presents the Background Noise Podcast Series with Roycer, RAE, Enzo & Nio, OverUnder, Tony Depew, Futura and more

What’s ahead for you?

I’m having a baby girl in a few weeks, so that’s first and foremost on my mind right now.  But outside that, I just want to keep this project going for as long as I can. I have a lot of great artists lined up: Jilly Ballistic, Elle, Left Handed Wave, Don Pablo Pedro, C215, Beau, Cash 4, Hellbent, Joseph Meloy, Hanksy, N’DA….all very exciting. Stay tuned!

Congratulations! It all sounds great!

Images with links to their podcasts

1. Roycer  2. RAE  3. Enzo & Nio  4. OverUnder & 5. Tony Depew

Questions for Bomarr by City-as-School intern, Annie Loucka; interview edited by Lois Stavsky. 

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Logan Hicks artist talk Love Never Saves Anything    Paintings and Photos by Logan Hicks Continues through March 19 with Artist Talk on Sunday

Love Never Saves Anything, a solo exhibit of stencil paintings and photographs by the wonderfully talented Logan Hicks, opened last week during Armory Week and remains on exhibit through Wednesday, March 19. Here’s a small sampling of the haunting stencil paintings on view:

A Drop of Blood Shed

Logan Hicks A Drop of Blood Shed Love Never Saves Anything    Paintings and Photos by Logan Hicks Continues through March 19 with Artist Talk on Sunday

Her Hands Said What her Lips Couldn’t

Logan Hicks Her Hands Said What Her Lips Could not Love Never Saves Anything    Paintings and Photos by Logan Hicks Continues through March 19 with Artist Talk on Sunday

Behind Her Eyes

Logan Hicks Behind Her Eyes Love Never Saves Anything    Paintings and Photos by Logan Hicks Continues through March 19 with Artist Talk on Sunday

 Treading Water

Logan Hicks Treading Water Love Never Saves Anything    Paintings and Photos by Logan Hicks Continues through March 19 with Artist Talk on Sunday

Deep Sleep

Logan Hicks Deep Sleep1 Love Never Saves Anything    Paintings and Photos by Logan Hicks Continues through March 19 with Artist Talk on Sunday

The following scenes were captured at last week’s opening:

Logan Hicks and artwork Love Never Saves Anything    Paintings and Photos by Logan Hicks Continues through March 19 with Artist Talk on Sunday

Logan Hicks opening night Love Never Saves Anything    Paintings and Photos by Logan Hicks Continues through March 19 with Artist Talk on Sunday

Logan Hicks signs book Love Never Saves Anything    Paintings and Photos by Logan Hicks Continues through March 19 with Artist Talk on Sunday

And the artist talk with Logan Hicks, led by Lori Zimmer, will take place 4PM this Sunday, March 16, at the gallery on 154 Stanton Street on Manhattan’s Lower East Side. This exhibit is the artist’s second solo show with PMM Art Projects.

Photos of artwork by Lois Stavsky and Dea Sumrall; images of opening by Dani Reyes Mozeson

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This is the fourth in a series of occasional posts showcasing sticker art that surfaces on an array of NYC public surfaces:

Screwtape’s homage to Army of One

screw tape sticker art NYC NYC Sticker Art — Part IV: Screwtape, Skullphone, Kosby, Fling, RAE, Faust, RealAbstract, CB23, Zato and Sticker Nerds 3 Call for Stickers

Skullphone goes small

skull phone sticker NYC Sticker Art — Part IV: Screwtape, Skullphone, Kosby, Fling, RAE, Faust, RealAbstract, CB23, Zato and Sticker Nerds 3 Call for Stickers

One of Kosby‘s many musings

Kosby NYC Sticker Art — Part IV: Screwtape, Skullphone, Kosby, Fling, RAE, Faust, RealAbstract, CB23, Zato and Sticker Nerds 3 Call for Stickers

Fling’s curious creature

Fling street art stciker character NYC NYC Sticker Art — Part IV: Screwtape, Skullphone, Kosby, Fling, RAE, Faust, RealAbstract, CB23, Zato and Sticker Nerds 3 Call for Stickers

RAE’s lovable, zany character

RAE street art sticker NYC NYC Sticker Art — Part IV: Screwtape, Skullphone, Kosby, Fling, RAE, Faust, RealAbstract, CB23, Zato and Sticker Nerds 3 Call for Stickers

Faust‘s calligraphic handstyle

faust NYC Sticker Art — Part IV: Screwtape, Skullphone, Kosby, Fling, RAE, Faust, RealAbstract, CB23, Zato and Sticker Nerds 3 Call for Stickers

Milwaukee-based RealAbstract‘s magnetic sticker

real abstract street art sticker NYC NYC Sticker Art — Part IV: Screwtape, Skullphone, Kosby, Fling, RAE, Faust, RealAbstract, CB23, Zato and Sticker Nerds 3 Call for Stickers

CB 23′s now-iconic character in the rain

CB 23 NYC Sticker Art — Part IV: Screwtape, Skullphone, Kosby, Fling, RAE, Faust, RealAbstract, CB23, Zato and Sticker Nerds 3 Call for Stickers

Zato’s much-loved fellow

Zato street art sticker NYC NYC Sticker Art — Part IV: Screwtape, Skullphone, Kosby, Fling, RAE, Faust, RealAbstract, CB23, Zato and Sticker Nerds 3 Call for Stickers

And for those stickerheads who’d like to participate in the upcoming Sticker Nerds 3, organized by the inimitable Skam Sticker, the deadline to get your slaps in is this Friday, March, 14th.  Send them to Sticker Nerds 3, Post Office Box 13492, Portland, Oregon 97213.

sticker nerds 3 NYC Sticker Art — Part IV: Screwtape, Skullphone, Kosby, Fling, RAE, Faust, RealAbstract, CB23, Zato and Sticker Nerds 3 Call for Stickers

Photos of NYC sticker art by Lenny Collado, Dani Reyes Mozeson and Lois Stavsky

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Born in Canada, Lady K-Fever is a NYC-based interdisciplinary artist, art educator and curator. A recipient of numerous grants, she currently works with the Bronx Museum of the Arts, the Studio Museum in Harlem, the Bronx River Arts Center and the Laundromat Project.

Lady K Fever graffiti NYC Speaking with Lady K Fever

When and where did you start getting up?

I started bombing in Vancouver, Canada in the early 90’s. I got all over the city. No block was safe.

What inspired you back then?

In 1992, I found The Faith of Graffiti at a thrift shop and bought a bootleg copy of Wild Style. I immediately fell in love with graffiti.  I was also into skateboarding at the time, and I was a member of the Riot Grrlzs: The Vancouver Chapter.  We were invited to create an installation for an exhibition “Artropolis 1993.” We collaborated to create a graffiti-inspired tag wall about human rights.

What spurred your interest and engagement in social issues?

I was inspired by activism of the Black Panthers and counter culture of the 1960’s & 70’s.

What about graffiti crews? Did you belong to any?

My first crew was the one I created with some of my friends in Vancouver, the ILC crew: The Independent Ladies Crew. I have since put down with lots of other crews: CAC, TLV (the Latin Vandals), IBM, and WOTS.  Right now I am down with KD-TDS-INDS.

Lady K Fever and Cern Speaking with Lady K Fever

Any early graffiti memories?

I’ll always remember the first three-color piece/bomb I did on my own.  It was all about timing.  It was in 1996 in downtown Vancouver, and I had hidden behind a car. I started to paint in the shadow of the car and hide when traffic was coming by. It was a thrill, and I wanted to do more.

When did you first get up in NYC?

My first time painting here was in 2001 at The Phun Phactory before it became 5Pointz. While there, I met so many people and artists who have helped me along my path. I am so grateful that there was a place like that – a place for the global graffiti movement to connect and blossom in New York City.

Have you ever been arrested?

Pleading the 5th and the 4th. 

Have you exhibited your works?

I began exhibiting my work in galleries in 1993 in Vancouver.  In NYC, I have exhibited at  the Bronx Museum of the Arts, El Museo del Barrio, Longwood Art Gallery, The Corridor Gallery, Andrew Freedman Home and MoMA.

HOWIEGARCIA LADYKFEVER Kathleena 12 op 640x356 Speaking with Lady K Fever

What percentage of your time is devoted to your artwork?

100 percent. All day. Every day. It’s my life. Life is my art. My art is the facilitation of my experiences as a creative human on this planet. I am inspired and find inspiration all day long.

Have you made money from your work?

I sell pieces, do commissions, apply for grants and residencies, teach and consult with museums and arts organizations, speak at schools and conduct workshops. Hustle is hustle.

Any thoughts about the so-called graffiti/street art divide?

The boundaries continue to blur.  I thought we all fought hard for graffiti to be considered “art”. A writer is a writer; an artist is an artist. Both are valid and beautiful and all artists have the right to decide how they want to be identified. What I do not like is the dogma and the prejudices that arise. If graffiti and street art are ultimately forms of freedom of expression, then what really is going on?

Do you prefer working alone or working with others?

Both. I like working alone, and I like the interaction that happens when artists work together. I go through phases.

Lady Fever students Speaking with Lady K Fever

Do you have a formal arts education?

Yes and no. I studied fine art in high school and in college, but I formally went on to major in Theatre.  I worked as a studio assistant with a Canadian pottery artist and as a scenic painter on film/TV sets to gain art trade skills.

What is the riskiest thing you’ve done?

I have done a lot of risky things. On my last day in Toronto, I did a bridge piece along a highway in downtown Toronto.  I wrote the name Lady K Fever in huge letters on the whole bridge.  As I was finishing, I saw a set of police lights flash across the highway. I ran and hid all the way home. That was my exit from Toronto.

Are there any particular cultures that have influenced your aesthetic?

I’m influenced by all cultures. I go through inspirational phases. I love texture and color. I like to work with Indian, African and Mexican fabrics and designs.  Music is also an influence – its sounds, beats and lyrics.

Are you generally satisfied with a finished piece?

Yes and no.  Sometimes, I just have to walk away and move on to the next.

Fever graffiti South Bronx Husky Speaking with Lady K Fever

How has your work evolved throughout the years?

I continue to refine my style and explore concepts.

How would you describe the role of the artist in society?

The artist’s role is to tell stories through personal and collective reflections and responses and to raise questions. The artist is a messenger of universal truth who challenges others to see and acknowledge what they might not want to

Interview with Lady K-Fever conducted by Lenny Collado and edited by Lois Stavsky; photo credits 1. Lenny Collado; 2. Tara Murray; 3 – 5. courtesy of the artist

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Featured in SCOPE New York 2014 are over 30 artists who are, also, active on our cities’ streets. Here’s a small sampling:

Judith Supine at Black Book Gallery

Judith Supine art scope SCOPE New York 2014 with Judith Supine, Beau Stanton, My Dog Sighs, Stormie Mills, Know Hope, Peeta, Mark Jenkins, Banksy and more

Beau Stanton at Moniker Projects

Beau Stanton Scope SCOPE New York 2014 with Judith Supine, Beau Stanton, My Dog Sighs, Stormie Mills, Know Hope, Peeta, Mark Jenkins, Banksy and more

My Dog Sighs at Vertical Gallery

My Dog Sighs art Scope SCOPE New York 2014 with Judith Supine, Beau Stanton, My Dog Sighs, Stormie Mills, Know Hope, Peeta, Mark Jenkins, Banksy and more

Stormie Mills at Vertical Gallery

Stormie Mills art Scope SCOPE New York 2014 with Judith Supine, Beau Stanton, My Dog Sighs, Stormie Mills, Know Hope, Peeta, Mark Jenkins, Banksy and more

Know Hope at Thinkspace Gallery

KnowHope art Scope SCOPE New York 2014 with Judith Supine, Beau Stanton, My Dog Sighs, Stormie Mills, Know Hope, Peeta, Mark Jenkins, Banksy and more

Peeta at C.A.V.E. Gallery

Peeta graffiti scope SCOPE New York 2014 with Judith Supine, Beau Stanton, My Dog Sighs, Stormie Mills, Know Hope, Peeta, Mark Jenkins, Banksy and more

Mark Jenkins at Fabien Castanier

Mark Jenkins sculpture Scope1 SCOPE New York 2014 with Judith Supine, Beau Stanton, My Dog Sighs, Stormie Mills, Know Hope, Peeta, Mark Jenkins, Banksy and more

And Banksy at ArtNow NY

Banksy stencil art Scope SCOPE New York 2014 with Judith Supine, Beau Stanton, My Dog Sighs, Stormie Mills, Know Hope, Peeta, Mark Jenkins, Banksy and more

Located at 312 West 33rd St between 8th & 9th Ave, the fair continues through tomorrow, Sunday, March 9.  General admission is $25.00; student admission is $15.00.

Photos of artworks by Dani Reyes Mozeson and Lois Stavsky

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Early last month, on some of this year’s coldest days, a group of dedicated artists — once again — transformed the exterior of East 1st Street’s once-neglected trailer into an intriguing outdoor canvas. Here are a few of the images that will continue to greet passersby through April 10:

Michael DeNicola’s tribute to the late actor Philip Seymour Hoffman

Centre fuge public art project NYC Centre fuge Public Art Project    Cycle 12 with Michael DeNicola, BK, Col Wallnuts, Vernon OMeally, Edapt, Foxxface and Numb DSI

BK

BK Centre fuge Public Art Project NYC Centre fuge Public Art Project    Cycle 12 with Michael DeNicola, BK, Col Wallnuts, Vernon OMeally, Edapt, Foxxface and Numb DSI

Col Wallnuts

Col Wallnuts Centrefuge Public Art Project NYC Centre fuge Public Art Project    Cycle 12 with Michael DeNicola, BK, Col Wallnuts, Vernon OMeally, Edapt, Foxxface and Numb DSI

Vernon O’Meally, Edapt, Foxxface and Numb DSI

Vernon Peter Edapt Foxxface and Numb DSI Centre fuge Public Art Project    Cycle 12 with Michael DeNicola, BK, Col Wallnuts, Vernon OMeally, Edapt, Foxxface and Numb DSI

Vernon O’Meally

Vernon peter centre fuge public art project Centre fuge Public Art Project    Cycle 12 with Michael DeNicola, BK, Col Wallnuts, Vernon OMeally, Edapt, Foxxface and Numb DSI

Edapt and Foxxface

Edapt and Foxxface centre fuge Centre fuge Public Art Project    Cycle 12 with Michael DeNicola, BK, Col Wallnuts, Vernon OMeally, Edapt, Foxxface and Numb DSI

Numb DSI

Numb DSI Centre fuge Public Art Project    Cycle 12 with Michael DeNicola, BK, Col Wallnuts, Vernon OMeally, Edapt, Foxxface and Numb DSI

Photos by Dani Reyes Mozeson and Lois Stavsky

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Bio graffiti art Tats Crus Bio, Nicer and BG183 in the East Village: at TT Underground and on the Streets

Tats Cru members — Bio, Nicer and BG183 — express their distinct creative visions in Blood, Sweat and Tears, a playful exhibit on view through Friday at TT Underground, 191 2nd Avenue in the East Village. Here is a sampling of the recent artworks on display by the legendary Bronx-based Mural Kings:

Another painting by Bio with his iconic heart

Bio graffiti art 2014 Tats Crus Bio, Nicer and BG183 in the East Village: at TT Underground and on the Streets

Close-ups from Nicer’s superheroes

nicer Tats Cru comic art  Tats Crus Bio, Nicer and BG183 in the East Village: at TT Underground and on the Streets

Nicer Tats Cru comic super hero Tats Crus Bio, Nicer and BG183 in the East Village: at TT Underground and on the Streets

A huge canvas by BG 183

BG183 tats cru art on canvas Tats Crus Bio, Nicer and BG183 in the East Village: at TT Underground and on the Streets

And one of BG183′s smaller ones

BG 183 tats cru Tats Crus Bio, Nicer and BG183 in the East Village: at TT Underground and on the Streets

And just a few blocks away – on Second Street off Avenue A:

Bio

Bio Tats crew graffiti East Village Tats Crus Bio, Nicer and BG183 in the East Village: at TT Underground and on the Streets

Nicer

Nicer tats cru graffiti East Village Tats Crus Bio, Nicer and BG183 in the East Village: at TT Underground and on the Streets

BG183

BG183 Tats Cru graffiti NYC Tats Crus Bio, Nicer and BG183 in the East Village: at TT Underground and on the Streets

Photos of Bio’s paintings and mural by Lois Stavsky; photos of Nicer’s and BG183′s by Dani Reyes Mozeson 

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