Hektad and Urbanimal Repurposed art Fat Free Art <em>Bizarre Bazaar</em>: A Found Art Exhibit at Fat Free Art with Hektad, Urbanimal, Raphael Gonzalez, Tomaso Albertini, What Will You Leave Behind, Icy and Sot, Bianca Romero, SacSix, JPO, Suckadelic & more

An extraordinary array of found objects have been transformed into intriguing repurposed art for Fat Free Art‘s first annual Bizarre Bazaar.  Pictured above is Hektad‘s American graffiti flag looming over Urbanimal‘s table. Here are severel more works from this stylishly imaginative exhibit.

Raphael Gonzalez, An Ciana

raphael gonzalez photo repurposed fat free art <em>Bizarre Bazaar</em>: A Found Art Exhibit at Fat Free Art with Hektad, Urbanimal, Raphael Gonzalez, Tomaso Albertini, What Will You Leave Behind, Icy and Sot, Bianca Romero, SacSix, JPO, Suckadelic & more

Tomaso Albertini, Butterfly Effect, huge segment of framed piece

Thomas albertini repurposed fat free art segment <em>Bizarre Bazaar</em>: A Found Art Exhibit at Fat Free Art with Hektad, Urbanimal, Raphael Gonzalez, Tomaso Albertini, What Will You Leave Behind, Icy and Sot, Bianca Romero, SacSix, JPO, Suckadelic & more

What Will You Leave Behind, Worth Nothing

What will you leave behind repurposed fat free art <em>Bizarre Bazaar</em>: A Found Art Exhibit at Fat Free Art with Hektad, Urbanimal, Raphael Gonzalez, Tomaso Albertini, What Will You Leave Behind, Icy and Sot, Bianca Romero, SacSix, JPO, Suckadelic & more

Icy and Sot, Let Her Be Free

icy and sot repurposed fat free art <em>Bizarre Bazaar</em>: A Found Art Exhibit at Fat Free Art with Hektad, Urbanimal, Raphael Gonzalez, Tomaso Albertini, What Will You Leave Behind, Icy and Sot, Bianca Romero, SacSix, JPO, Suckadelic & more

Bianca Romero, The Muse Says — to the right of  Hektad‘s spray cans — and shoes designed by SacSix on shelf below

hektad bianca romero and sacsix repurposed art <em>Bizarre Bazaar</em>: A Found Art Exhibit at Fat Free Art with Hektad, Urbanimal, Raphael Gonzalez, Tomaso Albertini, What Will You Leave Behind, Icy and Sot, Bianca Romero, SacSix, JPO, Suckadelic & more

JPO, 3 of a Kind

JPO repurposed fat free art <em>Bizarre Bazaar</em>: A Found Art Exhibit at Fat Free Art with Hektad, Urbanimal, Raphael Gonzalez, Tomaso Albertini, What Will You Leave Behind, Icy and Sot, Bianca Romero, SacSix, JPO, Suckadelic & more

Suckadelic, Pussy Grabs Back

suck lord repurposed fat free art <em>Bizarre Bazaar</em>: A Found Art Exhibit at Fat Free Art with Hektad, Urbanimal, Raphael Gonzalez, Tomaso Albertini, What Will You Leave Behind, Icy and Sot, Bianca Romero, SacSix, JPO, Suckadelic & more

The exhibit continues through March 4 at Fat Free Art, 102 Allen Street on Manhattan’s Lower East Side. It is open Tuesday – Saturday 11AM-7PM & Sunday 12PM-5PM,

Photos by Lois Stavsky

Note: Hailed in a range of media from Wide Walls to the Huffington Post and the New York Times, our Street Art NYC App is now available for Android devices here.

en play badge 2 <em>Bizarre Bazaar</em>: A Found Art Exhibit at Fat Free Art with Hektad, Urbanimal, Raphael Gonzalez, Tomaso Albertini, What Will You Leave Behind, Icy and Sot, Bianca Romero, SacSix, JPO, Suckadelic & more

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klone foma street art tel aviv Tel Aviv Street Art: Klone, Foma, Dede, Adi Sened, Michal Rubin, Mr di Maggio, Jonathan Kis Lev, Ros Plazma, Signor Gi and Murielle

Reflecting Tel Aviv’s restless energy, much of the street art that surfaces there emanates a distinct edginess. Pictured above are long-running pieces by Klone and Foma. Here are several more recently captured:

Dede

dede bandaid tel aviv street art Tel Aviv Street Art: Klone, Foma, Dede, Adi Sened, Michal Rubin, Mr di Maggio, Jonathan Kis Lev, Ros Plazma, Signor Gi and Murielle

Adi Sened

adi sened street art tel aviv Tel Aviv Street Art: Klone, Foma, Dede, Adi Sened, Michal Rubin, Mr di Maggio, Jonathan Kis Lev, Ros Plazma, Signor Gi and Murielle

Michal Rubin

Michal Rubin Tel Aviv street art Tel Aviv Street Art: Klone, Foma, Dede, Adi Sened, Michal Rubin, Mr di Maggio, Jonathan Kis Lev, Ros Plazma, Signor Gi and Murielle

Mr di Maggio

mr dimaggio street art tel aviv Tel Aviv Street Art: Klone, Foma, Dede, Adi Sened, Michal Rubin, Mr di Maggio, Jonathan Kis Lev, Ros Plazma, Signor Gi and Murielle

Jonathan Kis-LevRos Plazma and more

varied artists tel aviv street art Tel Aviv Street Art: Klone, Foma, Dede, Adi Sened, Michal Rubin, Mr di Maggio, Jonathan Kis Lev, Ros Plazma, Signor Gi and Murielle

Signor Gi

signor G street art tel aviv Tel Aviv Street Art: Klone, Foma, Dede, Adi Sened, Michal Rubin, Mr di Maggio, Jonathan Kis Lev, Ros Plazma, Signor Gi and Murielle

Murielle Street Art

kiss me Tel Aviv Street Art: Klone, Foma, Dede, Adi Sened, Michal Rubin, Mr di Maggio, Jonathan Kis Lev, Ros Plazma, Signor Gi and Murielle

Photo credits: 1 Sara C Mozeson; 2-8 Lois Stavsky

Note: Hailed in a range of media from Wide Walls to the Huffington Post and the New York Times, our Street Art NYC App is now available for Android devices here.

en play badge 2 Tel Aviv Street Art: Klone, Foma, Dede, Adi Sened, Michal Rubin, Mr di Maggio, Jonathan Kis Lev, Ros Plazma, Signor Gi and Murielle

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The following guest post is by Houda Lazrak:

Since 2010, the annual urban art festival, Santurce Es Ley, has been gracing the walls of the downtown San Juan district of Santurce, revitalizing it with dozens of distinctive works by local and global street artists. Here are several that I came upon on my recent visit:

London native D*Face and Puerto Rican artist Bik Ismo

Dface BIKISMO street art Puerto Rico <em>Santurce Es Ley</em> in San Juan, Puerto Rico:  D*Face, Bik Ismo, Abey Charron, El Basta, Zio Ziegler, Morivivi, Seth, David Zayas and Pastel

Puerto Rican native Abey Charron

Abey Charron street art Puerto Rico <em>Santurce Es Ley</em> in San Juan, Puerto Rico:  D*Face, Bik Ismo, Abey Charron, El Basta, Zio Ziegler, Morivivi, Seth, David Zayas and Pastel

The Puerto Rican Collective El Basta

El Basta street art Puerto Rico <em>Santurce Es Ley</em> in San Juan, Puerto Rico:  D*Face, Bik Ismo, Abey Charron, El Basta, Zio Ziegler, Morivivi, Seth, David Zayas and Pastel

West Coast – based Zio Ziegler

Zio Zeigler street art puerto rico <em>Santurce Es Ley</em> in San Juan, Puerto Rico:  D*Face, Bik Ismo, Abey Charron, El Basta, Zio Ziegler, Morivivi, Seth, David Zayas and Pastel

Puerto Rican Collective Morivivi

Morivivi street art puerto rico <em>Santurce Es Ley</em> in San Juan, Puerto Rico:  D*Face, Bik Ismo, Abey Charron, El Basta, Zio Ziegler, Morivivi, Seth, David Zayas and Pastel

French artist Seth GlobePainter

Seth street art Puerto Rico <em>Santurce Es Ley</em> in San Juan, Puerto Rico:  D*Face, Bik Ismo, Abey Charron, El Basta, Zio Ziegler, Morivivi, Seth, David Zayas and Pastel

Puerto Rican artist David Zayas (top) and Buenos Aires-based Pastel

David Zayas and Pastel <em>Santurce Es Ley</em> in San Juan, Puerto Rico:  D*Face, Bik Ismo, Abey Charron, El Basta, Zio Ziegler, Morivivi, Seth, David Zayas and Pastel

All photos by Houda Lazrak

Note: Hailed in a range of media from the Huffington Post to the New York Times, our Street Art NYC App is now available for Android devices here.

en play badge 2 <em>Santurce Es Ley</em> in San Juan, Puerto Rico:  D*Face, Bik Ismo, Abey Charron, El Basta, Zio Ziegler, Morivivi, Seth, David Zayas and Pastel

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raphael gonzalez and Giz <em>Hip Hop Utopia: Culture + Community</em> at Jerseys Citys Dineen Hull Gallery Through February 21

While visiting Hip-Hop Utopia: Culture + Community at Hudson County Community College‘s Dineen Hull Gallery this past Friday, I had the opportunity to speak to Michelle Vitale aka woolpunk who — along with Fred Fleisher — curated the wonderfully eclectic exhibit.

What a fabulous tribute to hip-hop this is! What would you say is the exhibit’s mission?

Its mission is to celebrate the culture of hip-hop. Its four elements –  MCing, Graffiti, DJing and Breakdancing — have had a huge, positive impact on today’s society. This exhibit is our way of paying tribute to these elements and to the community that has nurtured them.

Dipset graffiti <em>Hip Hop Utopia: Culture + Community</em> at Jerseys Citys Dineen Hull Gallery Through February 21

Did anyone or anything —  in particular — inspire it?

The notion of curating an exhibit on hip-hop was first suggested by Hudson County Community College Vice President Dr. Pando.  It seemed like a great concept, as I love the communal aspect of hip-hop. Among the many inspirations was music industry veteran Tony Drootin who serves on the board of  Hip Hop Public Health.

Yishai Minkin Biggie <em>Hip Hop Utopia: Culture + Community</em> at Jerseys Citys Dineen Hull Gallery Through February 21

Just what is Hip Hop Public Health? I see it is represented in this exhibit.

Based in NYC, Hip Hop Public Health uses music as a message to improve health literacy and encourage positive behaviors among school children.  Its founder and president, Dr. Olajide Williams, MDMS serves as Chief of Staff of Neurology at Columbia University Medical Center.  Among the artists involved in Hip Hop Public Health are: Doug E. FreshEasy A.D Harris and Jordan Sparks.

Karlos Carcamo sculpture mic <em>Hip Hop Utopia: Culture + Community</em> at Jerseys Citys Dineen Hull Gallery Through February 21

Can you tell us something about some of your other partners? There are some great T-shirts on display here!

Among our partners is Chilltown Collective, an apparel and lifestyle brand based here in Jersey City. It was co-founded in 2015 by Lovelisa Dizon as a platform for “passionate creatives.”

chilltown collective <em>Hip Hop Utopia: Culture + Community</em> at Jerseys Citys Dineen Hull Gallery Through February 21

And there are quite a few bikes in the gallery!

Yes! We’ve partnered with both Grove Street Bicycles and Animal BikesGrove Street Bicycles is a nearby full-service shop that sells all kinds of bikes, accessories, clothing and shoes and handles all kinds of bicycle repairs. And Animal Bikes, owned by Ralph Sinisi, supplies bike parts for BMX street riding and also sells gear.

Fred Samboy and more art <em>Hip Hop Utopia: Culture + Community</em> at Jerseys Citys Dineen Hull Gallery Through February 21

What are some of the challenges you faced in curating an exhibit as multi-faceted as this one?

Once we knew what direction we wanted to go with the theme of Hip-Hop, everything came together easily. Our Karma has been great! We are showcasing works of noted established artists together with talented younger ones, several who are Hudson County Community College alumni. We have local DJ’s participating, as well as spoken-word artists.  We’ve planned a range of events open to the community.

Cultural Affairs Hip Hop Flyer Spring 2017 <em>Hip Hop Utopia: Culture + Community</em> at Jerseys Citys Dineen Hull Gallery Through February 21

How has the response to the exhibit been?

We’ve been open just a few days, and the response has already been great.  We’ve been featured in the Jersey Journal and listed as one of the top 10 current attractions in Jersey City.

Freddy Samboy Hip Hop Utopia <em>Hip Hop Utopia: Culture + Community</em> at Jerseys Citys Dineen Hull Gallery Through February 21

How can folks see the exhibit?

Our opening reception takes place Tuesday evening, January 31, from 6-8pm. The exhibit continues through Tuesday, February 21 at 71 Sip Avenue 6th Floor. Gallery hours are: Monday through Saturday from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Tuesday from 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. Admission is free and those who attend have a chance to win a graffiti-tagged, fat-tire bicycle donated by Grove Street Bicycles.

Michelle Vitale <em>Hip Hop Utopia: Culture + Community</em> at Jerseys Citys Dineen Hull Gallery Through February 21

Congratulations! It’s looking great!

Images

1.  Raphael Gonzalez, The Art of the Throw Up! Giz

2.  Alex Melo, Diplomatic Immunity

3.  Yishai Minkin, Biggie

4.  Karlos Carcamo, One, Two Three… 

5.  Mr Mustart with Chilltown Collective, I free myself…

6. Freddy Samboy, two works suspended from ceiling; Grove Street BicyclesDonated Fat Tire Bikes and Videos courtesy  Grove Street BicyclesAnimal & Hip Hop Public Health

7.  Raphael Gonzalez, Danielle

8. Freddy Samboy, Breaking Free

9. Jeremy Coleman Smith, DJ Shrine with Michelle Vitale aka wool punk seated

Photos and interview by Lois Stavsky

Note: Hailed in a range of media from the Huffington Post to the New York Times, our Street Art NYC App is now available for Android devices here.

en play badge 2 <em>Hip Hop Utopia: Culture + Community</em> at Jerseys Citys Dineen Hull Gallery Through February 21

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Dasic Fernandez and Rubin415 street art Yoav Litvin on <em>2Create: Art Collaborations in New York City</em>

Penned by photographer, writer, neuroscientist and street art aficionado, Yoav Litvin, 2Create: Art Collaborations in New York City is a distinctly elegant ode to the art of collaboration. Recently released by Schiffer Publishing, it was formally launched last month at the Bronx Museum of the Arts alongside a collaborative photography exhibit, 2gether: Portraits of Duos in Harlem and the South Bronx by Litvin and Tau Battice. A textual and visual documentation of the creative and collaborative process among nine pairs of artists, 2Create also presents first-hand accounts of each one’s early life and work.

Dasic Fernandez and Rubin415 paint Yoav Litvin on <em>2Create: Art Collaborations in New York City</em>

Featuring such duos from NYC-based Al Diaz and Jilly Ballistic to the Iranian brothers Icy and Sot, 2Create: Art Collaborations in New York City showcases a broad range of styles, sensibilities and processes. It also introduces us to the specific locale — from Manhattan’s Union Square Subway Station to a Greenpoint, Brooklyn rooftop — of each of the collaborative works featured. With its astute insights and superb design, it stands out among the dozens of street art-related books published last year.

bunnyM and Square paint street art Yoav Litvin on <em>2Create: Art Collaborations in New York City</em>

bunnyM and Square street art Yoav Litvin on <em>2Create: Art Collaborations in New York City</em>

After reading the book, I posed a few questions to Yoav:

Your first book, the highly acclaimed Outdoor Gallery: New York City, focused largely on individual artists. Why did you decide to focus on duos in this book? 

In contrast to other art forms, such as music or dance, the visual arts involve a more solitary practice. Painters are famous for being hermits: closing themselves off from the world in their studios where they paint their masterpieces. At least, that’s the popular narrative. I feel that because the visual arts are easily commodified and objectified, they have evolved in such a way.  While I was working on Outdoor Gallery, which focuses on 46 individual artists, I noticed several duos of street and graffiti artists who produced incredible works, and I was fascinated by their practices. In 2Create I seek to investigate the art and practice of collaboration in different mediums — collage work, screen printing, stenciling, graffiti and mural making. My goal with 2Create is twofold: to present the behind-the-scenes processes of these artists and to investigate the secrets of collaboration, with the ultimate aim of encouraging others to create together. Just like any skill, collaboration needs to be practiced!

Dain and Stikki Peaches Yoav Litvin on <em>2Create: Art Collaborations in New York City</em>

How did you decide which duos to feature in 2Create?

My process with 2Create was mostly democratic. I was looking to present a diversity of styles, messages, mediums and locales. I am cognizant and weary of the politics involved in the arts and attempted to focus on artists that I felt were doing radical, innovative work and were constantly challenging themselves. Throughout my research on collaborations, I discovered there were two major categories that lie on a continuum — from complementary collaborations – individual works presented side by side – to integrative, a single piece that seamlessly integrates the work of two artists. I chose nine duos that present the full spectrum.

Icy and Sot Yoav Litvin on <em>2Create: Art Collaborations in New York City</em>

Icy and Sot paint Yoav Litvin on <em>2Create: Art Collaborations in New York City</em>

What insights did you, yourself, gain into the collaborative process, particularly among visual artists?

Collaboration is a skill that should be practiced by any visual artist as part of his/her development. Collaboration is an exciting and stimulating process that can produce immense growth if approached correctly, but can be very challenging at times. An artist needs to respect and trust his or her collaborator and be willing to be adaptable and open to critique. The collaborative process can open new doors for an artist  – in techniques, messages, ideas and human connections that can be useful moving forward.

ASVP 2Create Yoav Litvin on <em>2Create: Art Collaborations in New York City</em>

The book, itself, is masterfully designed. Can you tell us something about that? 

For the design I worked with the designer Dan Michman, who is also an excellent childhood friend. It was important for me that every aspect of this project be collaborative. Dan is the best designer I know, plus I like him a lot and knew from experience that we’d collaborate well. Our process was incredible. Dan took my materials — images and texts — along with my notions on the artistic process and on collaboration, and created a stunning design “language” for the book. It was a truly integrative collaborative process. I could not be happier with the way it turned out. Plus, the cover design is simply stunning. Lastly, Schiffer Publishing did a great job in the book’s production.

2Create cover Yoav Litvin on <em>2Create: Art Collaborations in New York City</em>

How has the response been to 2Create?  Is there any particular readership you’d like to reach?

The response has been overwhelmingly positive. In addition to appealing to the street art and graffiti fan crowd, my hope is that 2Create will integrate as a text book for art schools, colleges and universities. I believe the behind-the-scenes process shots, the revealing interviews and the insight into the art of collaboration make it a unique resource for artists in general, and visual artists in particular. But 2Create is more than a book on art. It is a document that presents the collaborative duo as the basic unit of a collective humanity in which empathy and collaboration trump disregard and domination. In an era of the cult of celebrity, war and climate change, collective action is not only beneficial, it is necessary. 2Create expresses these radical notions and I hope it will serve to inspire activists fighting for the greater good.

For more listen to Yoav speak on Counterpunch Radio here.

Images

1 & 2 Rubin and Dasic 

3 & 4 Bunny M and Square 

5  Stikki Peaches and Dain

6 & 7 Icy & Sot

ASVP

All images © Yoav Litvin

Note: Hailed in a range of media from the Huffington Post to the New York Times, our Street Art NYC App is now available for Android devices here.

en play badge 2 Yoav Litvin on <em>2Create: Art Collaborations in New York City</em>

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sara erenthal art on piano Sara Erenthal Gives New Life to Discarded Objects on Park Slope Streets

A self-taught, multi-disciplinary artist, Sara Erenthal has a strong presence on the streets of Park Slope, Brooklyn. We recently spoke.

You’ve established quite a presence here on the streets of Park Slope. What keeps you coming back?

There is a lack of public art in Park Slope, and there seems to be a hunger for it. Folks here have been so receptive to what I am doing. They seem excited to have something interesting and different to look at.  Park Slope is where I am living these days, and so it’s easy for me to get around either by foot or by bike.

sara erenthal street art nyc Sara Erenthal Gives New Life to Discarded Objects on Park Slope Streets

With the exceptions of the walls you are commissioned to paint, your canvas is almost always some type of discarded object. Why is that?

Since folks take many of my works home with them, I feel that I am saving trash from ending up in landfills. Also – what I am doing is not illegal. I cannot take the legal risks of doing unsanctioned artworks that could land me with a fine, time in jail or both.

sara erenthal upcycled art nyc Sara Erenthal Gives New Life to Discarded Objects on Park Slope Streets

You almost always seem to be drawing faces. Can you tell us something about them?

They are variations of myself – subconscious portraits. Growing up in a cloistered ultra-Orthodox world, I was limited to just one hairstyle. The changes in the hairstyles represent the changes in myself.

sara erenthal mural art Sara Erenthal Gives New Life to Discarded Objects on Park Slope Streets

I’ve noticed folks stop and often photograph you while you are drawing.  Do any particular interactions with passersby stand out?

Yes! Recently a woman ran after me as I was rushing out of my house — in my pajamas — to the local health food store to buy some ginger. I was sick at the time. She asked me if she could bring her father – a huge fan since he had seen my work on a mattress — to meet me. He showed up almost instantly for his daughter to snap a photo of the two of us  – with me decked in my pajamas!

sara erenthal public art work park slope nyc Brooklyn Sara Erenthal Gives New Life to Discarded Objects on Park Slope Streets

In addition to your work on found objects, you’ve also painted on a range of sanctioned surfaces this past year. Any particular challenges? Any favorites?

Painting on a shuttered gate was definitely a challenge as I generally paint on flat surfaces. Among my favorites is the artwork that I painted at D’Vine Taste.

sara erenthal street art Park Slope Sara Erenthal Gives New Life to Discarded Objects on Park Slope Streets

Yes! I love the stark simplicity of the white on black. It’s beautiful! And what about the piano? How did that become your canvas?

A local pre-school threw it out last spring with a sign “Free piano.” Six months later it was still there. I asked then for permission to paint it. And I love that it is still there! I feel as though I gave it a new life.

sara erenthal make art from your heart NYC Sara Erenthal Gives New Life to Discarded Objects on Park Slope Streets

You did! What’s ahead? 

I am now preparing for a solo show to open at FiveMyles Gallery at 558 St Johns Place on March 9 from 6-9pm. And later in the spring, I will be exhibiting my work at Google’s New York site in Chelsea. An outdoor mural in Gowanus is also on the horizon.

I’m looking forward to it all! Good luck!

Photo credits: 1-5 & 7 Lois Stavsky; 6 Tara Murray; interview conducted and edited by Lois Stavsky

Note: Hailed in a range of media from the Huffington Post to the New York Times, our Street Art NYC App is now available for Android devices here.

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MuckRock street art Miami The RAW Project at Wynwoods Eneida M. Hartner Elementary School: Jules Muck, Mr. June, Zed1, Kevin Ledo, Shepard Fairey, Paola Delfin, Case Macclaim, Jarvis Landry & Kai Aspire

Back in 2014, the RAW Project transformed Wynwood’s Jose De Diego Middle School’s stark walls into a vibrant, sumptious outdoor gallery. During last month’s Art Basel, a team of artists — from across the globe — brought beauty and intrigue to the walls of Wynwood’s Eneida M. Hartner Elementary School. Pictured above is Jules Muck at work. Here are several more images captured on site by travel and street photographer Karin du Maire.

Mr. June at work

Mr June street art Miami The RAW Project at Wynwoods Eneida M. Hartner Elementary School: Jules Muck, Mr. June, Zed1, Kevin Ledo, Shepard Fairey, Paola Delfin, Case Macclaim, Jarvis Landry & Kai Aspire

Zed1

Zed street art Miami The RAW Project at Wynwoods Eneida M. Hartner Elementary School: Jules Muck, Mr. June, Zed1, Kevin Ledo, Shepard Fairey, Paola Delfin, Case Macclaim, Jarvis Landry & Kai Aspire

Paolo Delfin

Paola Delfin street art miami The RAW Project at Wynwoods Eneida M. Hartner Elementary School: Jules Muck, Mr. June, Zed1, Kevin Ledo, Shepard Fairey, Paola Delfin, Case Macclaim, Jarvis Landry & Kai Aspire

Kevin Ledo — on left — with Shepard Fairey (w/assistants) and Paolo Delfin at work earlier on

Kevin Ledo shepard fairey paola delfin street art Miami The RAW Project at Wynwoods Eneida M. Hartner Elementary School: Jules Muck, Mr. June, Zed1, Kevin Ledo, Shepard Fairey, Paola Delfin, Case Macclaim, Jarvis Landry & Kai Aspire

Case Maclaim at work

Case Maclaim street art miami The RAW Project at Wynwoods Eneida M. Hartner Elementary School: Jules Muck, Mr. June, Zed1, Kevin Ledo, Shepard Fairey, Paola Delfin, Case Macclaim, Jarvis Landry & Kai Aspire

RAW Project curator Robert Skran posing with Miami Dolphins’ Jarvis Landry aka Juice and Kai Aspire in front Kai’s and Jarvis’s collaborative artwork

Kai aspire miami street art The RAW Project at Wynwoods Eneida M. Hartner Elementary School: Jules Muck, Mr. June, Zed1, Kevin Ledo, Shepard Fairey, Paola Delfin, Case Macclaim, Jarvis Landry & Kai Aspire

All photos by Karin du Maire

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Louis Masia and Dicro Davis street art Miami  The Bushwick Collective and the Mana Urban Arts Project in Wynwood: Louis Masai, Davis McCarty, Michel Velt, Chor Boogie & Trek6, Sipros, Shepard Fairey and Fio

Last month during Miami Art Week, the Bushwick Collective once again collaborated with the Mana Urban Arts Project in facilitating first-rate public artwork in Wynwood, Miami. Pictured above is a mural by Louis Masai, along with an installation by Davis McCarty. Here are several more works captured by street photographer Karin du Maire.

Netherlands-based Michel Velt

Michael velt street art miami The Bushwick Collective and the Mana Urban Arts Project in Wynwood: Louis Masai, Davis McCarty, Michel Velt, Chor Boogie & Trek6, Sipros, Shepard Fairey and Fio

West Coast-based Chor Boogie – in front of mural — and Miami’s Trek6

Chor Boogie and Trek6 street art miami The Bushwick Collective and the Mana Urban Arts Project in Wynwood: Louis Masai, Davis McCarty, Michel Velt, Chor Boogie & Trek6, Sipros, Shepard Fairey and Fio

Brazilian artist Sipros

sipros miami street art  The Bushwick Collective and the Mana Urban Arts Project in Wynwood: Louis Masai, Davis McCarty, Michel Velt, Chor Boogie & Trek6, Sipros, Shepard Fairey and Fio

LA-based Shepard Fairey aka Obey Giant in front of one segment of his huge mural

Shepard Fairey street art miami The Bushwick Collective and the Mana Urban Arts Project in Wynwood: Louis Masai, Davis McCarty, Michel Velt, Chor Boogie & Trek6, Sipros, Shepard Fairey and Fio

Chilean artist Fiorello Podesta aka Fio

Fio street art miami The Bushwick Collective and the Mana Urban Arts Project in Wynwood: Louis Masai, Davis McCarty, Michel Velt, Chor Boogie & Trek6, Sipros, Shepard Fairey and Fio

All photos by Karin du Maire

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toxicomano mural art gama mexico city A Visit to GAMA, a Creative Urban Arts Space, in Mexico City

While in Mexico City several weeks ago, I had the chance to visit GAMA, a distinctly impressive artists’ space and gallery in Colonia Hipódromo, and speak to its founder, Daniel Martinez and his partner, Kas Chudleigh.

This is such a wonderful space with so much positive energy. Can you tell us a bit about GAMA? There are quite a few people here. Who are you?

We are a group of artists that seek to nurture each other and others by collaborating, offering workshops, showcasing our work and providing opportunities for creatives.

root rises art graphic art mama mexico city A Visit to GAMA, a Creative Urban Arts Space, in Mexico City

How long have you been in this particular space? It is ideal.

We’ve been here on the ground floor of Comitán 10, Hipódromo since June 30th.

How would you describe GAMA‘s mission?

With a particular focus on street art and urban art, we work with a diverse group of graphic designers, illustrators, photographers and muralists. We perceive the GAMA space as an education and resource center that offers a wide range of events, talks and exhibits, along with opportunities to collaborate with brands.

Yolka graphic design A Visit to GAMA, a Creative Urban Arts Space, in Mexico City

Can you give us some examples of the workshops offered here?

Upcoming workshops include: watercolor painting with Diego Andrad; working with 3-D in the gif format with Chacalall, and designing illustrations with Yolka Mx.

You’ve also curated outdoor murals. I visited the one painted by Werc and Gera Luz earlier today. When did you first become interested in street art? 

In 2005 — over 10 years ago — I started creating stickers and wheatpastes. I also began following online what was happening throughout the globe, and then I spent time in Berlin and Barcelona, where I saw so much amazing art on public spaces.

Werc and gera luz street art mexico city A Visit to GAMA, a Creative Urban Arts Space, in Mexico City

What would you say is your greatest challenge at this point?

The major one is attaining the support we need to maintain the space.

What’s ahead? Any particular projects — besides all the wonderful things happening here?

We’d like to produce a series of documentaries about some of the artists we work with. We are especially interested in the creative process. What motivates and inspires artists? We’re also interested in establishing alliances with different cultural projects in Mexico and connecting to more emerging artists.

gleo colombian artist gama A Visit to GAMA, a Creative Urban Arts Space, in Mexico City

It all sounds great! How can folks contact you if they would like to visit or become involved?

They can contact us at contacto@gamacrea.com. They can also follow us on Instagram and on Facebook.

Images

1. Toxicómano

2. Root Rises

3. Yolka Mx

4. Werc and Gera Luz

5. Gleo

Photos and interview by Lois Stavsky 

Note: Hailed in a range of media from the Huffington Post to the New York Times, our Street Art NYC App is now available for Android devices here.

en play badge 2 A Visit to GAMA, a Creative Urban Arts Space, in Mexico City

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Viajero mixed media 2016 A Visit to <em>Home, Memory, and Future</em> at Caribbean Cultural Center African Diaspora Institutes (CCCADI) New East Harlem Home

While visiting CCCADI’s inaugural exhibit in its new East Harlem home, I had the opportunity to speak to one of its curators, Regina Bultron-Bengoa

Just what is CCCADI?

The Caribbean Cultural Center African Diaspora Institute is a multi-disciplinary arts center that showcases and promotes the distinct contributions of African Diaspora cultures.

How would you define its mission?

Through arts, education and activism it strives to advance change by uniting the various cultures of the African Diaspora, while promoting their value.

Viajero installation close up A Visit to <em>Home, Memory, and Future</em> at Caribbean Cultural Center African Diaspora Institutes (CCCADI) New East Harlem Home

When was it originally established?

Dr. Marta Moreno Vega founded it in 1966 as a center where African and Native cultures of Caribbean and Latin American countries could be recognized and honored. Its first home was on East 87th Street and its last home was in a brownstone in Hell’s Kitchen.

Can you tell us something about its present locale here in this landmark space on East 125 Street in East Harlem?

A few years back, several shuttered landmark firehouses were offered to cultural institutions. With city and state support, nine million dollars were raised to renovate this particular historic one for CCCADI, and on September 16, 2004, we broke ground.

Scherezade Garcia Sea of Wonder 2016 A Visit to <em>Home, Memory, and Future</em> at Caribbean Cultural Center African Diaspora Institutes (CCCADI) New East Harlem Home

Who is its audience?

We have a wide audience from students and educators to arts professionals to families. We offer a huge range of free or low-cost exhibits, workshops and activities.

Your inaugural exhibit, Home, Memory, and Future is quite impressive. It is divided into three distinct parts.

Yes. Part I: Harlem: East and West features the works of three acclaimed photographers who have been documenting Harlem since the 70’s. Part II: Harlem and Home in the Global Context showcases artworks that suggest how cultural traditions are used to establish “home” in distant places. And Part III: Mi Quirido Barrio (My Beloved Community) – focusing on the social history of El Barrio — takes place outdoors and in cyberspace, using augmented reality. Among its themes are: migration, nostalgia for the past. gentrification and looking to the future.

che memorial wall east harlem nyc A Visit to <em>Home, Memory, and Future</em> at Caribbean Cultural Center African Diaspora Institutes (CCCADI) New East Harlem Home

Can you tell us some more about the outdoor element of the exhibit?

Yes. It features locations of importance within the social history of El Barrio. Among these are memorial walls painted on the streets – whose history is documented on a free mobile app, Blippar. Through augmented reality, the app allows us to bring the past to life.

That is quite amazing! How has the response been to CCCADI‘s new home and inaugural exhibit?

The response has been great. There were long lines for the fall opening, and folks who see it love the art and identify with it.

Chino Chan Memorial Mural El Barrio NYC A Visit to <em>Home, Memory, and Future</em> at Caribbean Cultural Center African Diaspora Institutes (CCCADI) New East Harlem Home

How can folks contact CCCADI if they would like to visit or become involved?

They can email: info@cccadi.org

Images 

1 & 2 Adrian “Viajero” Roman, Mixed media, 2016

3  Scherezade Garcia, Sea of Wonder, Mixed media, 2016

4 & 5 Oliver Rios & Luis Martinez, Memorial Walls, as seen on the Blippar app while on site

Photo credits: 1-3 Lois Stavsky; 4-5 Courtesy CCCADI

Interview conducted and edited by Lois Stavsky

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