Shiro

The following guest post is by Houda Lazrak

This past Saturday, The Point’s Riverside Campus for Arts and the Environment in the South Bronx was the site of the Ngozy Art Collective‘s second live painting event. Curated by Sade TCM, the joyous afternoon featured over a dozen female graffiti writers and muralists painting away.

The legendary Lady Pink

The classic Bronx-based graffiti writer Erotica 67 Fly ID

 Shiro

Gia and Anjl

Steph Burr

And some more action — with Zera to the right of Shiro

Also featured was an art gallery photography exhibition by Gloria Zapata that continues through Saturday, November 17. Here is one of Gloria’s photos featuring her original work:

Photos 1-7 by Houda Lazrak; final photo Gloria Zapata

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The latest, soon-to-be-released edition of the street art coloring book series by Aimful Books, created by Diego Orlandini, features images of murals from the streets of Brooklyn, NYC’s Mecca of urban art.  Intent on contributing to educating children across the globe, Aimful Books matches every coloring book purchased with a free textbook to a school-age child. Its ultimate goal is to provide a million free textbooks to children by selling one million street art coloring books.

Deftly curated, The Brooklyn Coloring Book features the talents of over 40 artists who have shared their visions with us on the streets of Brooklyn. Among them are: Shiro, Chris RWK, Icy and Sot, Beau Stanton, Lady PinkAlice Mizrachi, Esteban del Valle and Denton Burrows.

And you can win a free copy of the $25.00 Brooklyn Coloring Book before it’s released to the public!

  • 76 premium pages
  • Perforated pages easy to detach to frame or gift your masterpieces
  • Spiral-bound for easy folding
  • 7.87 in x 7.87 in
  • Artworks of 48 world-class street artists
  • Full-color directory
  • Buy One Give One Initiative

For a chance to win a free copy, go to www.aimfulbooks.com/giveaway to participate in 10 seconds or less.

Images

  1. Shiro
  2. School children in Peru
  3. Chris RWK at work
  4. Shiro (L.) and Icy and Sot (R.)
  5. Coloring book cover

All images courtesy of the street art-loving, socially conscious Aimful Books

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Hosted by James Top, Joey TDS and Poke IBM, the 38th Annual Graffiti Hall of Fame took place this past weekend in East Harlem. Pictured above is the work of Vase One and KingBee  (standing to the left of  Shiro on the ladder). Several more photos of images captured yesterday follow:

Shiro tags subway map

Skeme

Terrible T-Kid

Cope 2

Break Uno

Delta 2 at work

And you can find more images from the historical two-day event on the StreetArtNYC Instagram.

Photos by Lois Stavsky

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This is the eighth in a series of occasional posts featuring images of children that have surfaced on NYC public spaces:

Nick Walker in the South Bronx

Nick-walker-street-art-bronx

Izolag in Hunts Point

izolag-street-art-south-bronx-nyc

Chain for JMZ Walls in Bushwick

s-chain-street-art-nyc

Lorenzo Masnah on the Lower East Side

lorenzo

Miss 163 in Hunts Point

miss-163-street-art-hunts-point-nyc

Australian artist Adnate at the Bushwick Collective, close-up

adnate-street-art-bushwick-collective-nyc

Icy and Sot on the Lower East Side, close-up

icy-sot-street-art-nyc

Shiro in Bushwick

shiro-street-art-nyc

Note: Entre La Guardia y El Dorado, featuring works by Lorenzo Masnah (featured above) and Alex Seel, will open this evening at 6pm at XY Atelier Gallery, 81 Hester Street on the corner of Orchard. It will remain on view until August 30.

Photo credits: 1 Tara Murray; 2, 3, 5, 6 & 8 Lois Stavsky; 4 courtesy of the artist 7 Dani Reyes Mozeson

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In this third in our series of interviews with artists born abroad who have made NYC home, we feature Pesu. Inspired by hip-hop, Pesu began his art career back in Japan in 1996 as a graffiti writer. Here in NYC he is best-known for his live painting in various venues and the many Art Battle competitions he has won. His works on canvas in a multiplicity of styles — from stencil art to abstract art — increasingly attract collectors, as well.

Pesu

When did you first visit NY? And what brought you here?

In 2001 I left Japan for Sacramento, California on a student visa. But life there was too slow for me. So in 2004, I decided to check out New York City.

What was your impression of it at the time?

I was thoroughly overwhelmed. I remember walking on 5th Avenue and crying – tears of joy! This city has everything: so much energy, art, graffiti, mix of people and amazing architecture. And there is always something happening here.

Pesu-black-book-graffiti

What is the image of NYC in your native country?

Back in Japan we think of NYC as the number one city in the world. It is the place of opportunity.

Do you think this is accurate? Why or why not?

Yes! I agree! Everything is possible here in NYC.

Pesu-art-face-

When did you decide to move here? And why?

I decided to move here the following year – in 2005. Why? Because I loved it!

How did your family feel about your move?

They were great. Everyone was very supportive. And they were always worried about me when I was doing graffiti back in Japan.

Pesu-blackbook-graffiti

What were some of the challenges you faced when you first moved here?

I had to find a way to earn money. And I had to worry about having a visa. I also wasn’t used to living in such a competitive city.

You now have a great space in the East Village. Where did you live when you first moved here? And why did you choose that particular neighborhood?

When I first moved here, I lived in Bed-Stuy.  I found the apartment through a broker. I chose Bed-Stuy because I love Biggie so much.

Pesu-abstract

Have you encountered any prejudice here?

Yes. I’ve encountered some. Folks here are not all that accustomed to seeing Asians in the hip-hop scene.

How has your artwork evolved or changed since you came here?

I tend to use brighter, more vivid colors. My art is more alive here in NYC! And it’s become more professional.

Pesu-and-shiro-graffiti-art

How receptive have New Yorkers been to your artwork? To you?

They seem somewhat surprised by what I do, as they are not used to seeing Asians in this scene!

What would you like to accomplish here?

As an artist, I want to make people happy. And on a more personal level, I would like to bring my parents to America.

Pesu-fine-art

What do you miss most about your native country?

My parents and the food I ate back in Japan.

Interview by Lois Stavsky with City-as-School intern Zachariah Messaoud; photos 1-4, 6 (collab with Shiro) & 7 by Lois Stavsky; 5 by Zachariah Messaoud; images  2 & 4 are from Pesu’s blackbooks from the late 90’s.

Note: Several of Pesu’s works will be on exhibit in Brooklyn is the Future opening Friday at the Vazquez at 93 Forrest Street in Bushwick.

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In an eclectic range of visual styles and themes, music makes it way to NYC walls. Here  is a small sampling:

Zeso, close-up from huge mural in Bushwick

zeso-close-up

Andre Trenier, lead artist, in the Bronx

andre-collaborative

 Kingbee, Pose2 and Chemis in East Harlem

kingbee-pose2-chemis-harlem-street-art

MeresSloneSee TFShiroIZK and more in Bushwick

hip-hop-street-art-bk

Close-up

meres-and-slone-street-art-nyc

Manny Vega in East Harlem

Manny-Vega-street-art-portraits-NYC

Sonni in Bushwick

Sonni-street-art-NYC

Mike Brown on the Lower East Side

Mike-Brown-street-art-nyc

Unidentified artist in Bedford-Stuyvesant

unidentified-bed-stuy-nyc

Photo credits: 1, 2, 5 – 9 Lois Stavsky; 3 Dani Reyes Mozeson; 4 Tara Murray

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The first day of spring 2015 brought wintry snow to NYC. Here are a few images I captured while in Greenpoint for the day:

 Phetus

phetus-greenpoint

Matthew Denton Burrows

matthew-denton-burrows-street-art-nyc

Cern

Cern

Tone

tone-greenpoint

 Faring Purth

Farin-Purth-greenpoint-NYC

ShiroYes One and Tone MST

shiro-yes1-tone-graffiti-greenpoint-nyc

To be identified

greenpoint-graffiti-nyc

 Miro RIS (& Shiro, top right)

Miro-graffiti-Greenpoint-nyc 

Photos by Lois Stavsky

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The walls in the vicinity of McGuinness Boulevard and Clay Street in Greenpoint continue to showcase a diverse range of vibrant graffiti. Here are a few captured this past week:

Justin Phame and Bella Amaral

Justin-Phame-and-Bella Amaral-graffiti-NYC

Shiro2ESAE and Yes One

shiro-2esae-yes1-graffiti-greenpoint-nyc

Noah TFP

Noah-tfp-graffiti-nyc

Wolf 1 AOK

wolf-graffiti-nyc

Tone MST

tone-mst-graffiti-greenpoint=nyc

Photos by Lois Stavsky 

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We’ve been noticing more and more subway trains on walls down in Brooklyn and up in the Bronx.  Here’s a sampling:

Damien Mitchell for the Bushwick Collective

"Damien Mitchell"

Downer Jones in Bushwick

"Downer Jones"

Bella Amaral in Bushwick for JMZ Walls

"Bella Amaral"

Danielle Mastrion in Bushwick for the Dodworth Street Mural art project

"Danielle Mastrion"

Dek 2DX in the Mott Haven section of the Bronx

Dek2DX

Shiro in Bushwick for JMZ Walls

Shiro

Cern in Williamsburg

Cern

Photos: 1, 2, 4 and 6 by Lois Stavsky; 3 by Tara Murray; 5 by City-as-School intern Zachariah Messaoud and 7 by Dani Reyes Mozeson

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Sometimes they last for months; other times for weeks or even just days. But the graffiti that surfaces on Bushwick’s walls, particularly on those streets off the L line, are among NYC’s best.  Here’s a small sampling of what we captured last month:

Denver-based Home

HOME

Owns

"Owns graffiti"

Rath

Rath

Spot KMS captured at work; completed piece here

Spot

Yes1 captured at work, with Shiro to his right

"Yes1 and Shiro"

Gusto

Gusto

Vers

Vers

Photos by Dani Reyes Mozeson

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