See One

Pictured above is Ecuadorian artist Toofly, captured at work this past Saturday, the official launch of the 9th Welling Court Mural Project. What follows are several more images captured by travel and street photographer Karin du Maire aka Street Art Nomad this past Friday and Saturday at this model community-driven mural project conceived and curated by Ad Hoc Art.

Brooklyn-based See One at work

The legendary Daze, standing in front of his mural, produced with Crash

Swedish artist Carolina Falkholt at work      

The nomadic Never Satisfied at work

Multi-disciplinary artist Ryan Seslow, huge segment of completed mural

Cambridge, MA-based Caleb Neelon with Boston-based Lena McCarthy, close-up

The murals are on view 24/7 on and around Welling Court in Astoria, Queens.

Photos:Karin du Maire aka Street Art Nomad

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This is the 13th in a series of occasional posts featuring the range of faces that have surfaced in NYC open spaces:

Toofly at the Welling Court Mural Project in Astoria, Queens

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David Choe, close-up from his all-too-ephemeral mural on Bowery & Houston

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Cernesto at the Welling Court Mural Project in Astoria, Queens

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Tristan Eaton at Coney Art Walls

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See One in Long Island City for Arts Org

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Berlin-based Spanish artist Victor Landeta aka Aum in Bushwick

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 Photos by Lois Stavsky

Note: Hailed in a range of media from WideWalls to the Huffington Post to the New York Times, our Street Art NYC App is now available for Android devices here.

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Curated by Ad Hoc Art, the Welling Court Mural Project is once again bringing a diverse range of intriguing murals to Welling Court and its neighboring blocks in Astoria, Queens. Many artists have already begun painting in anticipation of tomorrow’s Block Party. A few have already finished. Pictured above is a completed mural by See One. Here are several more images I captured today:

Queen Andrea

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 SP One at work

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Bluze

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Sinned NYC

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Onel and Roberto Castillo

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ASVP at work

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Tomorrow’s Block Party begins at noon at 11-98 Welling Court at 30th Avenue & 12th Street in Astoria, Queens.

Photos by Lois Stavsky

Note: Hailed in a range of media from Wide Walls to the Huffington Post to the New York Times, our Street Art NYC App is now available for Android devices here.

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The Education Is Not a Crime Campaign, a street art campaign for educational equality in Iran, continues to grace Harlem with stylishly expressive, mural art on the theme of education. Within the last two weeks, four artists brought their skills and visions to PS 92 — located at 222 W 134th St. Pictured above is Brooklyn-based See One at work. What follows is an interview conducted on site with Not A Crime founder, Maziar Bahari — a journalist, filmmaker and activist who had been arrested without charge in Iran and detained for 118 days during the 2009 Iranian election protests.

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Can you tell us something about the Not a Crime Campaign? Its mission?

The Not a Crime Campaign is an awareness-raising campaign about the educational discrimination directed primarily against the Baha’is in Iran. The Baha’is of Iran are the largest minority in that country. Since the 1979 Islamic Revolution, they have not been able to enjoy their rights as citizens in terms of employment and education. Our campaign focuses solely on education and the fact that the Baha’is in Iran can not teach or study in universities.

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Why did you choose to use street art to get your message across?

We thought that the best way to fight against suppression and bigotry is with arts and creativity. We’ve been involved with street art, music, film… At this moment the major part of our campaign involves street art. Why street art?  We live in a digital age. And we thought it would be interesting to have something really analog like street art and mix it with digital technology.

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Our campaign is all about dialog and discourse. And through street art we can have different layers of dialog and discourse. I am not a  Baha’i myself, so I have this dialog with the Baha’i community.  And, then as a team, we have a dialog with the artists and with Street Art Anarchy, the organization that helps us choose the artists and negotiate the walls.  The artists, then, have a dialog with passersby.  Then the passersby have a dialog among themselves. And then we create a video about each wall and we put it on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram. And, finally, viewers from all around the wall can interact with the videos.

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What are some of the challenges presented by this project?

We face some challenges, but they are nothing compared to what some people go through every day in different countries. People who are arrested just because they want to be educated…people who are tortured just because they want to teach, to study. I’m almost ashamed of talking about our challenges, which are really minor. But NYC is a big, crowded city with a bureaucratic government. And each wall requires negotiating with the building owners, and there are many by-laws that restrict what we can do. But, again, these challenges are minor.

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How has the response been?  And why Harlem?

The reaction of the Harlem community has been amazing. We have found a home in Harlem. We chose Harlem because the people here understand discrimination. Harlem is in NYC, and the media attention to NY is always amazing. And we wanted to be in NY where world leaders gather in September for the United Nations General Assembly. But also Harlem is synonymous with the Harlem Renaissance.  And we see that people react to our walls here in ways that many people in other places didn’t. People in Harlem get our message immediately, and they appreciate the way we do things. And in addition to working with the street artists who create these beautiful works of art, we also work in the community in terms of outreach and other subjects.

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What’s ahead?

A continuation of what we’ve started. To have more connections with the community…to see what they want from us… what we can offer them in terms of providing our expertise with street art or music. And to talk about the subject that’s dear  to everyone around the world — and especially the people in Harlem — the subject of education and discrimination.

Thank you so much for the interview, Mr. Bahari. And good luck with the campaign.

Interview conducted by Karin du Maire and edited for Street Art NYC by Lois Stavsky

 Images

1. See One at work

2. Maziar Bahari, founder of  Not A Crime campaign, as captured during interview

3. Tatyana Fazlalizadeh at work

4. Tatyana Fazlalizadeh

5. Lmnopi mural in progress

6. Lmnopi, close-up with young admirers

7. Marthalicia 

 Photo credits: 1-3 & 5 Karin du Maire; 4 Tara Murray and 6 & 7 Lois Stavsky

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While visiting the Bushwick Collective on Thursday as it was readying for its 5th Annual Block Party, we had the opportunity to spend some time in its wondrous pop-up museum at 198 Randolph Street. The brainchild of Bushwick Collective founder Joe Ficalora, it showcases an extraordinary array of works by Bushwick Collective artists, along with art by community members, local youth, Parsons School of Design at the New School students and more.  We also had the chance to speak to the Bushwick Collective Museum‘s director, Asja Gleeson.

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This is all so amazing! There are works here by artists who’ve exhibited in museums, along with art by children who live in the neighborhood. Just about every art genre and style is represented here. How did you connect to so many diverse artists?

Joe Ficalora simply gave me a list of the folks he’d already reached out to. In the five years since he’s founded the Bushwick Collective, he’s made so many wonderful connections.

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How did you connect to Joe? 

Dan Witz introduced me to Joe two years ago, and I worked with Joe and Dan on the exhibit for the Collective’s 3rd Annual Block Party.  The experience was so fantastic that I was thrilled to have an opportunity to be involved once again with the Bushwick Collective.

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As director, what are some of your responsibilities in managing an exhibit of this scope?

I had to contact all the artists and make sure that their work arrived in a timely fashion. I assisted Stan Sudol  the director of the Mana Urban Arts Project, in installing the works. And, basically, I was in charge of organizing the exhibit and assuring that it runs smoothly.

What — would you say — was your greatest challenge?

Getting it all together in the span of a week.

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That’s quite an accomplishment! Have you an academic or professional background in art? 

Both my parents are artists, and I studied Art History and related fields at Bard College at Simon’s Rock. I’ve also worked in several Chelsea galleries.

How does working here differ from working in Chelsea?

It’s more of a labor of love here! The pace is faster, and there’s far more community involvement here in Bushwick than in Chelsea.

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What is your impression of the art on exhibit here? Have you any favorites?

I’m so impressed by the quality of it all. There are so many wonderful pieces. Among my favorites is the one by Enx. It speaks to me!

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How can folks see this exhibit? It’s an amazing opportunity to not only view such an eclectic selection of quality artworks, but to purchase art at remarkably reasonable prices — with all proceeds going directly to the artists.

It remains open to the public from 10am-5pm through the weekend. 

Images

1.  Giz and Ghost, RIS

2. Dan Witz, with director Asja Gleeson

3. Tim Okamura

4. Enx

5. Anna Orcutt-Jahns

6. Nicer, Tats Cru

7.  See One

Photo credits:  1, 2, 4 – 7 Tara Murray, City-as-School intern Sol Raxlen; interview conducted and edited by Lois Stavsky

Note: Hailed in a range of media from the Huffington Post to the New York Times, our Street Art NYC App is now available for Android devices here.

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Opening this evening from 6-9pm at World Trade Gallery is Off the Wall, an exhibit featuring artwork by some of our favorite artists. We recently had the opportunity to speak to its curator, Joshua B. Geyer.

What is the concept behind this exhibit?

I wanted to showcase in a gallery setting artworks by a diverse group of high-caliber artists who work in public spaces, as well as in their studios. My current job is just a few blocks away from the Top to Bottom Mural Project on 21st Street. I pass it every day, and I love it. I thought it would be a great idea to feature those artists, as they are among the best anywhere.

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When did you first begin working on Off the Wall?

I first found out about the availability of the space three weeks ago. One of my friends who works in World Trade Gallery offered me the opportunity to curate an exhibit beginning in mid-March.

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What was your greatest challenge in getting this together in such a short timespan?

My greatest challenge was selecting the artists.  There was so much talent to choose from.  Close to 50 outstanding artists have painted in the Top to Bottom Mural Project.  I also wanted to take into consideration the input I was given from the team — James P Quinn and Geoff Kuffner — who implemented the project.

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Do you feel that you have accomplished your mission?

Yes! The artworks in Off the Wall are representative of the diverse range of outstanding pieces that have surfaced at 43-01 21st Street in LIC since this past September. And this space couldn’t be more ideal!

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We love your flyer. Did you design it?

It was a collaborative venture between See One and me. The photo is mine and the actual design is See One’s.

What’s ahead?

I’d love to build a relationship with World Trade Gallery, and I look forward to curating more exhibits featuring artists whose works are seen on our streets.

Images

1. Icy and Sot, close-up

2. Erasmo and Case Maclaim

3. See One

4. Daze

Photo credits: 1, 3 & 4 Dani Reyes Mozeson; 2 Lois Stavsky

Note: Hailed in a range of media from the Huffington Post to the New York Times, our Street Art NYC App is now available here for Android devices.

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Based in Detroi’s Eastern Market district, 1xRUN is the world’s leading publisher of fine art editions for original art.  Also host to Detroit’s Inner State Gallery, a world-renowned exhibition space, it works with established and emerging artists throughout the globe. When I stopped by on my recent visit to Detroit, I had the opportunity to speak to 1xRUN Production Manager Brian Lacey.

Can you tell us something about your role as 1xRUN production manager? Just what does your job entail?

I am involved with every step of the printing process. I communicate with the artists, set up files for printing, retouch images, trim prints, create certificates of authenticity and I place orders with vendors.

You are an artist. Is that what attracted you to this particular space? 

Yes, as an artist I was drawn to this space. I have a background in graffiti and a degree from the College for Creative Studies, where I studied illustration and fine arts.

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Has your experience as a graffiti writer impacted you?

Definitely! Graffiti is a great teacher. I learned a lot from it — on so many levels.

1xRUN collaborates with so many extraordinary artists. How do you select them? Is it a team effort?

Yes! It’s definitely a team effort. We have weekly sessions where a group of us meet to make curatorial decisions. Selections are made by the consensus of us all.

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Has your position at 1xRUN presented any personal challenges?

As someone who loves working hands-on, I had to adjust to spending a lot of time in front of a computer. But it’s awesome to be able to look at art all day!

1xRUN is best-known for the first-rate prints it produces. Does it offer anything in addition to prints?

It does offer a number of original works, books and sketches.

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What about the name 1xRUN?

It’s about offering limited editions of outstanding works that run for one time (1X) only.  Too many print releases can devalue an artist’s work.

I can see that. I love these images on exhibit in Tag the Jewels. Can you tell us something about this project?

It is a partnership among Run The Jewels, 1xRUN and Mass Appeal. Graffiti artists from around the world created murals celebrating the one year anniversary of Run The Jewels 2 (RTJ2). On exhibit are 20 photos of these murals spanning six continents.

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 What a great concept! And what an amazing range of art on display throughout this space! 

Images:

1. Brian Lacey to the right of his artwork, T002

2. Jesse Kassel and Elmer for Tag the Jewels

3. See One for Tag the Jewels

4. Binho for Tag the Jewels

5. Frop and Muso for Tag the Jewels

Interview and photos by Lois Stavsky

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bk-foxx-art-all-city-street-art-expo

Opening tomorrow at 23 Meadow Street in East Williamsburg, the three-day All City Art Expo 2015 is an exuberant celebration of NYC’s outdoor art culture. We stopped by yesterday and had the opportunity to speak to Evan Tobias of Cluster Wall who, along with Kevin Michael, curated the exhibit.

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This is quite an eclectic collection of art here! What is the concept behind the All City Art Expo?

It is a celebration of all outdoor art. We wanted to showcase a range of artwork — by sticker artists, graffiti writers, street artists and muralists — all in one setting.

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And it looks great! How did you find such an ideal setting?

We began looking at spaces awhile back. And Mona Liza Furniture — a huge arena with ample outdoor space —  offered to host us.

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It couldn’t be more perfect! When did you begin working on this All City Art Expo?

I met Kevin Michael many months ago. We began working together on this project back in the winter.

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There are so many artists here representing so many different styles, concepts and genres. How did you choose which ones to include?

When Kevin and I came up with this concept, we wrote up a wish list that included a range of artists from Old School graff guys to ones whose works have surfaced recently on our streets.

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What was your greatest challenge in organizing this event?

Handling the logistics behind working with over 100 artists!

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What can visitors expect — besides a chance to see and purchase such an extensive selection of artworks?

The Sticker Social Club will join us and visitors will have a chance to “slap and share.”  There will be a Black Book Jam on Sunday with many Old School writers in attendance. On both Saturday and Sunday a Groundswell artist will lead mural workshops. And there will be music all weekend by DJ Pumpkin, food by Arrogant Swine, along with drinks, vendors and raffles.

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Can you tell us something about your relationship with Groundswell?

We have asked each artist to donate a canvas — an All City Compact Canvas — that will be sold for $150.00. Proceeds will be donated to Groundswell to support the wonderfully transformative projects the organization brings to our communities in its work with youth.

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Good luck!  It’s all so impressive, and it looks like it will be so much fun!

Images: 1. BK Foxx 2. Dain 3. See One 4. Rob Plater 5. Zimad 6. Taki 183 and Nic 707 7. Art is Trash 8. Rocko

Interview by Lois Stavsky

Photo credits: 1, 3 5-8 Lois Stavsky; 2 & 4 Dani Reyes Mozeson

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Designed to link artists with schools, Project BrookLYNK has transformed EBC High School for Public Service in Bushwick into an exuberant outdoor/indoor gallery. We recently visited the school and spoke to Project BrookLYNK director, Thomas Gleisner aka Tommy Gee.

What a wonderful space! How lucky these students, teachers and staff members are! What exactly is your role in making this happen? And what is your relationship to this school?

I engage the artists, oversee the execution of the murals and organize a range of activities related to the artworks. I also teach art and Special Education.

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 When did it all begin? 

The first mural inside our building, Black Lives Matter — painted by Bevon Brewster — surfaced over four months ago.  Then in June, Melbourne-based artists-in-residence Geoffrey Carran and Rowena Martinich involved our students in painting murals and instructed them in a variety of art activities. Since then, it’s been an ongoing project.

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How has your principal responded to this intitiative?

Our principal, Shawn Brown, loves it. I’ve known him since 2010, when we worked together at another high school in Brooklyn. We share a similar educational vision.

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And how have the students and faculty members reacted?

Most haven’t seen all of the art yet. But their response to what they did see was positive. The students love it. And the teachers were quite surprised at first, but their response has also been positive.

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How have you managed to involve so many artists — and so many celebrated street artists?

Some are friends; others are friends of friends, and some are referred to me.

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 What’s ahead?

More murals, more artists’ residencies and more community engagement and collaborative projects here at EBC High School for Public Service. And I would, also, like to expand Project BrookLYNK to other schools in the fall.

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That would be great! We are looking forward to seeing more!

Note: The murals pictured above are a small sampling of the dozens of pieces in disparate styles by local, national and international artists that can be seen inside and outside EBC High School for Public Service located at 1155 Dekalb Avenue in Bushwick, Brooklyn. More info and links here, and keep posted to our Facebook page for many more images.

Murals: 1. Geoffrey Carran and Rowena Martinich 2. D. Gale 3. Rob Plater 4  Nepo 5. Hori Shin 6. See One 7Phetus

Photos: 1-4 Lois Stavsky; 5-7 Tara Murray

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Curated by Ad Hoc Art, the Welling Court Mural Project is once again bringing a wonderfully diverse array of public art to Welling Court and its neighboring blocks in Astoria, Queens. Here is a sampling of what’s been happening as artists ready for today’s official launch:

Chris Cardinale

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LMNOPI

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Wane

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RRobots and Evan Cairo to his right

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Sinned

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See One

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Queen Andrea

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The 6th Annual Welling Court Mural Project officially opens with a block party today, Saturday, June 13, at 30th Ave & 12th Street from 12-8PM.

Note: First image is of Icy & Sot.

All photos by Tara Murray.

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