Ramiro Davaro

sold-magazine-cover -URNewYork

The second issue of SOLD Magazine — the magazine by artists for artistswas formally launched last night with an Affordable Art Show at Chelsea’s Studio Kraut.  After checking out the art — that had already been installed when I came by — and perusing the magazine, I spoke to SOLD Magazine‘s publishing editor BD White.

Back in January, you, John Paul O’Grodnick and Greg Frederick first launched SOLD Magazine. How has the response to it been? What kind of feedback have you gotten?

The response has been overwhelmingly positive. People were eager to become involved with it. We had a steady stream of encouraging emails, text messages, phone calls and comments. It was the incredibly enthusiastic response to SOLD Magazines first issue that has kept us going!


How did you go about distributing the premiere issue of your magazine?

We distributed over 3,000 copies — 20 at a time — by getting them anywhere and everywhere! We hit art stores, alternative spaces, cafes, bagel and muffin shops…just about any place that was open to receiving our magazine.

This second issue looks fantastic! There are revealing interviews with UR NEW YORK, City Kitty and Appleton, along with a range of intriguing feature articles. You even have a recipe for wheat paste, this issue’s theme! How was the experience of getting SOLD Magazine out different this time around?

It was easier! Most of the kinks had already been worked out. The actual layout took far less time. And because of the buzz that the first issue generated, artists approached us, as they were eager to be featured.


Did any unanticipated challenges come your way?

Because everyone who worked with us was so cooperative and accommodating, we were able to easily overcome any potential obstacles.

I like this venue. Even the setting for the artwork is perfect. How did Studio Kraut come your way?

Yes, it is great! The backdrop had already been painted and designed by Dripped On Productions, and Kwue Molly introduced us to this space.


What’s ahead for SOLD Magazine?

The next issue will focus on muralists. You are in for a surprise! And keep posted for news of our upcoming podcast In the Spray Room.

How can folks get hold of the magazine if it is not easily accessible to them?

They can subscribe. That is the one way they will be sure not to miss an issue!


Congratulations! I’m already looking forward to the next issue! I’m heading out now to read this one cover-to-cover!

Pictured above are:

1. Cover of SOLD Magazine  Issue #2 featuring UR NEW YORK, Mike Baca aka 2esae and Ski; photo by John Paul O’Grodnick

2. BD White,

3. Raphael Gonzalez, City Kitty, CB23, JCorp, JPO, BD White and Joseph Meloy

4, Ramiro Davaro

5, Choice Royce

Photos of artworks and interview by Lois Stavsky



SOLD Magazine launched this past Thursday evening with an exhibit — co-curated with Ellis Gallagher — and party at 17 Frost. When I stopped by early in the evening, I had the opportunity to speak to John Paul O’Grodnick, who — along with Greg Frederick and BD White — made it all happen.

 Just what is SOLD Magazine?

SOLD Magazine is a free magazine by artists for artists and art lovers. Among its features are: artists interviewing each other, studio visits, artist and photographer profiles, a travel section and much more.

What motivated you thee to launch it?

A sense that artists need a new platform for exposure. Our mission is to provide that platform.


 When did you guys first begin working on SOLD Magazine? And how did you fund it?

We began working on it at the beginning of October, and we funded it via a Kickstarter campaign.

It’s great that your campaign was so successful! What has been your greatest challenge in seeing this through?

Rounding up the artists whom we wanted to participate in our venture.


 Was it an open call? How did you decide which artists to include?

No! It was artists we’ve known and worked with in the past. Some of them suggested others.

How often do you expect to publish SOLD Magazine?

Once every three months. It is intended as a quarterly.


How will folks be able to get hold of it?

We plan to make it available in galleries and museums throughout the city, as well as in local businesses here in Williamsburg.

I notice that this premier issue focuses on female artists, with your first cover featuring Gilf and Elle. What can we expect in future issues?

Every issue will have a theme. Our next one will focus on collaborations.

Ramiro-Davato-art -at-17-Frost

 That sounds great! Congratulations!

Note: The above images of are of works that were on exhibit and for sale at Thursday evening’s SOLD Magazine‘s launch:

1. Jily Ballistic and John Paul O’Grodnick aka JPO

2. Chris RWK

3. Raquel Echanique

4. Elle

5. Ramiro Davaro

Interview by Lois Stavsky and photos by Tara Murray


This is the 17th in an occasional series of posts featuring images of girls — and women — who grace NYC public spaces:

Swoon in Red Hook


JR in the East Village


Gabriel Pitcher in Bushwick


Panmela Castro with Opni in the Bronx


Ramiro Davaro with JMZ Walls in Bushwick


 Anthony Lister in Bushwick

Anthony-Lister-street-art-bushwick-nyc 2

Close-up of Lister’s ballerina


 Photo credits: 1 & 2 Tara Murray; 3-5 Lois Stavsky, and 6 & 7 Dani Reyes Mozeson



Earlier this summer, the Centre-fuge Public Art Project once again transformed the now-famed trailer on East First Street off First Avenue, bringing color and intrigue to Manhattan’s East Village.

D. Gale at work


Vince Ballentine










Wide view with PawnKingbee and Ramiro Davaro


Photos: 1, 3-6 & 8 Dani Reyes Mozeson; 2 & 7 Tara Murray

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With influences ranging from comic book art to South American/European muralism, Brooklyn-based Ramiro Davaro has created a wondrous world of fantastical characters who have made their way onto public and private spaces throughout NYC and beyond. We recently had the opportunity to visit Ramiro’s studio and speak to him.

When did you first paint on a public surface and where?

It was back in high school around 2002. I was about 16 at the time. I painted some mushrooms on a huge rock at a park we used to go hiking in.  It was the worst. I basically ruined a nice lookout.

What inspired you to do so?

I was getting tired of painting on small surfaces. I wanted a larger canvas so I could paint way bigger! But what I painted was so dumb that it took a few years before I was ready to try again.  My first real art on the street was in 2007 in Buenos Aires.


Do any early graffiti/street art-related memories stand out?

I remember seeing lots of political art – with faces of politicians and names of soccer teams — on the streets of Argentina when I was a young child.

What percentage of your day is devoted to your art these days?

About 70%. When I’m not doing something art-related, I’m skateboarding.

How does your family feel about what you are doing?

Everyone likes my work and has been very supportive.


Any thoughts on the graffiti/ street art divide?

I don’t feel it, and I don’t think about it. I love both, and they’re both necessary.

How do you feel about the movement of graffiti and street art into galleries?  We’ve seen your work at Cotton Candy Machine in Williamsburg and you are now showing with Brandon Sines at Grumpy Bert in Downtown Brooklyn.

I think it’s good for everyone!

What about the corporate world? Any feelings about that?

So long as I can dominate the conversation and be true to my vision, I don’t have a problem with it.


How you feel about the role of the Internet in this scene?

It’s a bit much! It can be insane. But on the positive side, it creates opportunities for artists, and it also builds bridges.

Do you have a formal arts education?

No. I majored in Business. But my mom used to always take me to art museums. While growing up in Massachusetts, I got my very early schooling at the Worcester Art Museum.

Do you work with a sketch in your hand or do you let it flow?

I mostly just let it flow.


Are you generally satisfied with your work?

About 80% of the time!

How has your work evolved in the past few years?

Before moving to Brooklyn, I had been able to visit and live in different countries. As a result of my experiences, my process has become more mature, more thought-out, and tighter. Working with different companies, painting murals in a range of places and engaging in various projects have also helped me become more flexible and fluid in the work I can produce. In these past couple of years, my hand has really taken over and put a definitive mark on the work I produce.

Are there any artists out there whose works have inspired you or influenced your particular aesthetic?

I remember reading about David Ellis and the Barnstormers crew in Juxtapoz back in 2008.  That blew me away!  As far as influences — Os Gemeos, D*Face and Word to Mother come to mind.

sines- davaro

What’s ahead?

More shows and more murals! A group show in LA at Luz de Jesus Gallery in September; a few animations with FlipBooKit for the Maker Faire here in NYC in at the end of September; painting at Art Basel in December; a group exhibit at Redefine Gallery in Orlando in February. Books, walls, Aruba, Argentina and more art!

It sounds great! Good luck with it all!

Note: Through Sunday, you can check out Ramiro’s works — many in collaboration with Brandon Sines — at Grumpy Bert in Downtown Brooklyn.

Photos: 1, 5 Tara Murray; 2 – 4 Lois Stavsky


This is the eighth post in an occasional series featuring artwork on NYC shutters:

Sweet Toof on the Bowery for the LISA Project

"sweet toof"

With Darkclouds


Ben Eine in the Mott Haven section of the Bronx

"Ben Eine"

Ramiro Davaro in the Bronx for the Tag Public Arts Project


Kashink in Bushwick


The Drif on the Lower East Side for the LISA Project

"the drif"

Buff Monster on the Bowery


 Photos 1, 2, and 7 by Tara Murray; 3 and 4 by Lois Stavsky; 5 and 6 by Dani Reyes Mozeson


"Ramiro Davaro"

A motley crew of  characters, conceived by Argentine American artist Ramiro Davaro, can be found not only on the streets of Brooklyn, but — for the next few days — his Manimal Friends remains on exhibit at Williamsburg’s Cotton Candy Machine. Here are some more of his characters that have surfaced on the streets:

For Juicy Art Fest


On Scholes and Waterbury, 2013

"Ramiro Davaro"

Close-up, on Waterbury and Meserole, 2014

"Ramiro Davaro"

Outside the Cotton Candy Machine

"Ramiro Davaro"

And inside the Cotton Candy Machine — one of many, Pen and Ink, Acrylic Paint on Paper

"Ramiro Davaro"

Also on sale at the Cotton Candy Machine are signed copies of Ramiro’s colorfully illustrated new book Manimal Friends. Located at 235 South 1st Street (between Roebling and Havemeyer), Cotton Candy Machine is open Tuesday through Sunday from noon to 8pm.

Photos 1, 3, 5 and 6 by Dani Reyes Mozeson; 2 and 4 by Lois Stavsky 


"Exit Room"

A wonderfully diverse group of artists have been busy these past 10 days fashioning the walls of Exit Room in preparation for tonight’s opening of Track 1, the first in a series of short exhibitions. Here’s a sampling of what’s been going down:

Esteban del Valle

"Esteban del Valle"



Nicole Salgar

"Nicole Salgar"

Marka 27

"Marka -27"

 Ramiro Davaro

"Ramiro Davaro"



And here’s a close-up of a collaborative work in progress that we captured last Thursday:

Sonni, Marka 27 and Carlos Pinto

"Sonni, Marka 27 and Carlos Pinto"

Other featured artists include: Chuck Berret, Ricardo CabretChris RWKAdam Dare, Jeff Enriquez, Art by KenNepoJohn Paul O’Grodnick and Gio Romo. There will also be a live musical performance by Mike Larry Draw X 86 SUPREME. Tonight’s opening takes place at 270 Meserole Street in Bushwick, Brooklyn from 6 – 11pm.

All photos of artists at work courtesy of Dariel Mtz and Zoe; photo of Sonni, Marka 27 and Carlos Pinto collaborative work in progress by Lois Stavsky