political art

lmnopi Tara Houska detail 2 Lmnopi on Street Art, Gentrification, Her Mission as an Artist & more

With her passion for justice and her elegant aesthetic, Brooklyn-based Lmnopi has been enhancing public spaces in NYC and beyond while raising our consciousness. I recently had the opportunity to visit her studio and speak to her:

When and where did your artwork first surface here on NYC walls?

I pasted up the first time in 2008, in Williamsburg, a stencil of my cat, Joe. I think it was on North 9th Street.

What inspired you to do so?

The thrill of lawlessness. Freedom, beauty, passion and communication beyond gallery walls. I just felt like it.

lmnopi street art Delon the Pigeon Lmnopi on Street Art, Gentrification, Her Mission as an Artist & more

Was there anyone in particular who inspired you to hit the streets?

I remember hanging out at Ad Hoc Art on Bogart Street a bunch and meeting other artists there. Chris Stain gave me some solid advice early on about stencil painting. I used to be really into C215. I love the artist Blu. He’s probably my all time favorite, actually. It wasn’t any one person though… more the lure of freedom that inspired me.

You’ve gotten up and painted in legal spots – such as Welling Court Mural Project and Arts Org in Queens. Yet much of what you do is unsanctioned. Have you any preference?

I prefer pasting up without permission. I have favorite places that I revisit now and again. It takes me awhile to pick my spots; I watch them for a little while first. Placement becomes more important when your paste-up is the only one in existence at a particular site. I also love the aesthetic of decay as erosion happens. Right now there is a piece of mine on Jefferson — that has been there for so many years — all that is left are her eyes and her mouth. It’s uncanny how that happens. It makes me pause and wonder: Why did her eyes and mouth stay the longest? What’s that about?

Have you any preferred surfaces?

My favorite is plywood. My least favorite is brick. I love pasting on glass, especially new condo windows.

LMNOPI Water Protector WIP Lmnopi on Street Art, Gentrification, Her Mission as an Artist & more

How do you feel about the increasing tie-in between street art and gentrification? The role of street art in gentrification?

People often blame gentrification on artists — instead of the underlying cause which is capitalism. Street artists are often used as tools for real estate CEO’s to increase their property’s value. However, it’s up to us as artists to decide if our work serves the community’s interest or the profit motive. I try to approach my work with the community in mind. When painting a mural on someone’s block, I take into consideration who lives there and how can I reflect their reality in my work. As great as it is to see tons of murals on walls, it turns people’s neighborhoods into destinations for outsiders to spend money in businesses that are run by non-local owners, so the financial benefit is not kept within the community, at all. The neighborhood becomes hollowed out; a place where people who grew up feel they no longer belong or can afford to live. The money spent there leaves the neighborhood when bodegas are run out by bourgie delis and trendy cafes and bars. When rich developers from other countries altogether come in and tear down perfectly good buildings and build hideous condos, it rips a hole in a community. It changes the landscape, removes the character and homogenizes the place. Gentrification is essentially urban colonialism. Creating community run-organizations which provide gathering spaces not centered around commerce and profit,  but instead around: discussion; education; making art, growing food; organizing and sharing resources, is an effective way to combat gentrification.

Yes! And in the current political climate — more necessary than ever.  I’ve also seen your work in gallery settings. How do you feel about bringing street art into galleries?

I enjoy group shows and getting out and being with the community of other street artists. I like to make miniatures of my murals for folks who want to bring them home and live with them. I struggle with the dissonance between anti-capitalism and the need to survive in a capitalist society. But it’s a great feeling to sell work.

Do you prefer working alone or collaborating with others?

I generally prefer working alone. but in the context of a larger community working towards change, I prefer being part of that wave.

lmnopi Backwater singer Lmnopi on Street Art, Gentrification, Her Mission as an Artist & more

Are there any other artists with whom you’d like to collaborate?

I look for certain people when I am out scouting locations, locally. It’s like having a delayed visual conversation on the street with other wheat paste artists like Myth NYCity KittyEl Sol 25, QRST, Sean Lugo… I also am inspired by the work the Justseeds cooperative is doing. Art and propaganda are like cinnamon and sugar on toast. So delicious. I’d like to collaborate with Chip Thomas from the Painted Desert Project. I also hope to do some painting in Indian country soon. I want to collaborate with people who are also committed to environmental justice.

Are you generally satisfied with your finished piece?

Yes. I feel like they come alive.

What percentage of your time is devoted to art?

Most of it when I am not sleeping or gardening or exploring.

lmnopi refugees are welcome Lmnopi on Street Art, Gentrification, Her Mission as an Artist & more

Have you a formal art education?

Yes. I studied painting and printmaking at SUNY Purchase where I got my BFA.  But most of what I am doing now is all self-taught.

What is your ideal working environment?

I’d love to have a studio in a straw bale house on land by a river with enough open area to grow food and enough forested area to forage wild mushrooms. I have a tiny studio which works all right for the time being, though, with my rooftop garden here in Brooklyn.

How do you feel about the role of the Internet in all this?

The Internet never forgets…which can be good or bad depending on what is out there to not be forgotten. For my kind of work, which is ephemeral by nature, it’s great. I love instagram because I get to see fellow artists’ work from all over the world. There is little static; it’s all visual. But as someone who was an adult before the phenomenon of the Internet existed, there was something really profound about seeing work in person that seems a bit lost now because everything is so accessible. People don’t have to travel to see anything; they just click around. Maybe that promotes a devaluation of work. I make a lot of work, but I don’t put a lot up. I think less is more…kind of a homeopathic approach.

lmnopi Indiria 2015 Lmnopi on Street Art, Gentrification, Her Mission as an Artist & more

Did any particular cultures influence you?

Ancient wall art. Petroglyphs. The earliest known graffiti art. I’ve seen them in person and it’s a mystical experience being in the presence of art that old.

How has your art evolved in the past few years?

From paint brush to x-acto knife back to paint brush. I went from painting with oils – high brow – to materials I could buy in a hardware store. The transition from oil painting was through stencils and spray paint. But I got really sick of using an exacto knife…too rigid. I love the paint brush. These days I like painting with house paint the most.

Do you work from a sketch or do you just let it flow?

When doing a mural, I sketch it out first; usually, I make a small painting of it prior to getting up on the wall.  When I am working in my studio, I just go to it.

lmnopi earth revolution street art nyc Lmnopi on Street Art, Gentrification, Her Mission as an Artist & more

What inspires you these days – with both your street art and studio art?

Right now my heart is very much with frontline communities who are bearing the brunt of the fall out from the corporate take over of the government: climate change (aka climate chaos), the fight against the fossil fuel industrial complex, the plight of kids caught in refugee situations and the Indigenous environmental movement. I am working from these struggles — working to communicate and amplify those voices, especially those of women, elders and kids.

What’s ahead?

I’m busy making art about everything that everyone else I know is also freaking out about. I am working on staying calm and making self-care a priority so I don’t burn out. I am developing some prints from paintings and drawings, a way to duplicate my work to make it more accessible for people who might enjoy having it or wearing it. I am thinking in terms of how to translate the continuous tone of painting into printable dot and line patterns for printing. I love the aesthetic of engravingsl and I have been training myself to paint in a way that mimics it. I am weaving the concept of editions that was possible with stencils together with the language of paint strokes I have been cultivating. In my painting practice, I have been destroying the object in a sense, breaking up the portrait with under-paintings of topographical maps, macro designs from botanicals and geometric forms and bringing in the occasional surrealistic imagery..Travel and time in nature are ahead of me and more frontline stands, hopefully some hot springs, plenty of walls to paint out there and forgotten doorways to paste up in.

What do you see as the role of the artist in society?

Artists are change makers and translators; art transcends borders and language barriers. Art is a unifying force. Artists can speak truth to power. We can show that the emperor is not wearing any trousers. We have artistic license; so far we still have free speech. We lift people’s spirits and let them know they are seen. We embolden people to laugh at fear. We clear out tear ducts.

Note: You can follow Lmnopi on her Instagram here and check out her online store here.

Interview by Lois Stavsky; all images courtesy of the artist

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UBcover <em>unbag</em> Co founder Andy Wentz on the Collectives First Arts Publication

A Brooklyn-based artist collective with a mission, unbag is planning to release its first arts publication this spring. I recently posed a few questions to unbag co-founder, artist and writer Andy Wentz.

Just what is unbag?  When and how did it all begin?

unbag is an arts organization that runs an ongoing critique group, curates shows with partner galleries, and is now producing its first publication. We started out as a small group of friends who wanted to do group studio visits about two years ago. It was always about supporting the folks within our small community. And this ethos of supporting artists that are underrepresented and share similar values to ours has continued to inspire us to expand the organization.

What is the significance of its title? It’s rather bizarre!

We needed a channel to organize members of our little critique groups, so early on we created a Facebook group to host events and announcements. Our idea to create the Facebook group came before we even saw a need to come up with a name for the group. So we just put it as Un-Named Brooklyn Artist Group and for some reason the acronym unbag stuck. I think it made sense to us as a name because it is a clunky synonym to ‘unpack’ which is what we were doing during the critique group. We’ve since dropped the long form title and are just unbag now.

manuel arturo abreu against the supremacy of thought 7 <em>unbag</em> Co founder Andy Wentz on the Collectives First Arts Publication

What prompted you to launch this particular project — a digital and print publication?

My friend, Aaron Cooper, and I were organizing the unbag critique group and leading some panel discussions at an experimental space called Sleep Center in Chinatown.  We started meeting a ton of artists from all over the world through these events, and that’s when we started to get the idea to have a project space of our own. But we weren’t interested in a brick and mortar gallery, and we thought that an interesting alternative would be to host artist projects online and in print. We realized early on that what we were doing wasn’t going to be a journal or a magazine in the traditional sense —  but rather something more malleable that would conform to the types of projects that our contributors are interested in sharing.

Who is your audience? Are their any particular groups you are targeting?

We are definitely targeting people in the art world, but folks who don’t take it too seriously. We’re not aspiring to be the next Art in America or anything like that. We hope to reach people who are interested in art, culture and political practice from artists who don’t necessarily already have a platform to share their work. We also hope that our readers are people who would become future contributors and join in the unbag community.

Ars Jupiter Page A 7 x 9 alt <em>unbag</em> Co founder Andy Wentz on the Collectives First Arts Publication

How did you decide what to feature in Issue #1?

We started with an open call for projects that use trickery as a strategy in their artistic production. We were definitely thinking of artists like Sophie Calle and Jill Magid when we came up with the idea for the theme. These artists are subversive and obsessive, and their motivations are not always clear to the viewer. Along with the open call, we also reached out to some artists and writers who, we thought, could contribute great projects because they already had a more subversive practice. We ended up getting about a hundred submissions and finally narrowed it down to thirteen projects that we thought fit the theme and worked well together as a group.

When will your premier issue be officially released?

The project will officially be released in May, and we will be hosting a launch event at Quimby’s in Williamsburg. Stay tuned for an official date for that event.

Loney Abrams <em>unbag</em> Co founder Andy Wentz on the Collectives First Arts Publication

What are some of the challenges you’ve faced in producing this first issue?

We’ve had to completely build everything from the ground up for this. So that means marketing, design, printing, fundraising, and more. All of these aspects have been a challenge. But we’re banking on the first issue being the most difficult to produce, and that in the future — with all these structures in place — it will be more about just finding the right contributors to feature. So we’re looking forward to the next issue for those reasons.

Note: The unbag Kickstarter continues through this Sunday, March 12.

Interview by Lois Stavsky & all photos of images courtesy Andy Wentz

Images

1. Haleigh Nickerson

2. Manuel Arturo Abreu

3. Peter Rostovsky

4. Loney Abrams & Johnny Stanish 

Hailed in a range of media from Wide Walls to the Huffington Post to the New York Times, our Street Art NYC App is now available for Android devices here.

en play badge 2 <em>unbag</em> Co founder Andy Wentz on the Collectives First Arts Publication

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Logan Hicks freddy Grays Day <em>Baltimore Rising</em> at Maryland Institute College of Art with Logan Hicks, Tony Shore, Nether 410 and more

On exhibit through Wednesday at MICA — the Maryland Institute College of Art — is Baltimore Rising, a powerful and poignant exhibition featuring the works of 15 artists who address the issues that led to the uprising following the death of Freddy Gray.  Featured above is a close-up from Logan Hicks’s Freddy Gray’s Day. What follows are a few more images from this timely exhibit:

Logan Hicks, Hot Spot, aerosol on linen

Logan Hicks Hot Spot <em>Baltimore Rising</em> at Maryland Institute College of Art with Logan Hicks, Tony Shore, Nether 410 and more

Tony Shore, Hands Up, Don’t Shoot, acrylic on velvet

tony shore hands up dont shoot <em>Baltimore Rising</em> at Maryland Institute College of Art with Logan Hicks, Tony Shore, Nether 410 and more

Tony Shore, Confrontation, acrylic on velvet

tony shore confrontation <em>Baltimore Rising</em> at Maryland Institute College of Art with Logan Hicks, Tony Shore, Nether 410 and more

Also by Tony Shore, The Vigil, acrylic on velvet

tony shore the vigil <em>Baltimore Rising</em> at Maryland Institute College of Art with Logan Hicks, Tony Shore, Nether 410 and more

Nether 410, Satyagraha, outdoor mural for Baltimore Rising

Nether410 Baltimore Rising <em>Baltimore Rising</em> at Maryland Institute College of Art with Logan Hicks, Tony Shore, Nether 410 and more

Photo credits: 1-5 Lois Stavsky; 6 Tara Murray

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Zoe Leonard text art high line nyc On the NYC High Line with Zoe Leonard, Tony Matelli, Matt Johnson, Kathryn Andrews and Barbara Kruger

With the mission of fostering a dialog with the surrounding neighborhood and urban landscape, High Line Art – curated by Cecelia Alemani — presents a wide array of provocative artworks in a range of media. Pictured above is I want a president, Zoe Leonard‘s 1992 text-based work installed on the occasion of today’s election. Here are several more works that can be seen on the High Line.

 Tony Matelli, Sleepwalker — for Wanderlust, a group exhibition exploring the themes of walking, journeys and pilgrimages

Tony Matelli sculpture high line nyc On the NYC High Line with Zoe Leonard, Tony Matelli, Matt Johnson, Kathryn Andrews and Barbara Kruger

And alone at dusk

Tony Marelli sculpture at dusk On the NYC High Line with Zoe Leonard, Tony Matelli, Matt Johnson, Kathryn Andrews and Barbara Kruger

Matt Johnson, Untitled — repurposed original High Line rail track  – for Wanderlust

matt johhson sculpture chelsea On the NYC High Line with Zoe Leonard, Tony Matelli, Matt Johnson, Kathryn Andrews and Barbara Kruger

 Kathryn Andrews, Sunbathers II, as seen at dusk

Kathryn Andrews Sunbather high line art chelsea nyc On the NYC High Line with Zoe Leonard, Tony Matelli, Matt Johnson, Kathryn Andrews and Barbara Kruger

Barbara Kruger, “BLIND IDEALISM IS REACTIONARY SCARY DEADLY, an adaptation of a quote from Frantz Fanon

Barbara kruger text art high line chelsea On the NYC High Line with Zoe Leonard, Tony Matelli, Matt Johnson, Kathryn Andrews and Barbara Kruger

Photo credits: 1 & 6 Lois Stavsky; 2 & 4 Dani Reyes Mozeson and 3 & 5 Romare Taylor

Hailed in a range of media from the Huffington Post to the New York Times, our Street Art NYC App is now available for Android devices here.

en play badge 2 On the NYC High Line with Zoe Leonard, Tony Matelli, Matt Johnson, Kathryn Andrews and Barbara Kruger

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Nether410 No Frontiers artwork Baltimore Based Nether 410 Brings his Vision to Chicago    in <em>Lets Talk About It</em> at Galerie F and with Pablo Machioli on the Streets of Pilsen

Earlier this summer, Baltimore-based Nether 410 shared his talents and vision with us up in the Bronx with the TAG Public Arts Project. More recently his particular socially-conscious aesthetic made its way to Galerie F’s current show Let’s Talk About It  and to the streets of Pilsen with Pablo Machioli. Pictured above is No Frontiers. Here are several more images with commentary by Nether:

Rising and Raising of the Super Block, close-up, Ink on paper canvas, 30″x22″

Between 1950 and 1969, Chicago’s housing authority built 11 enormous high rise projects for public housing, which isolated most of the extreme poor in “super-blocks.” Cabrini–Green, Henry Horner and Harold Ickes are some of these housing developments.  As the economy suffered, crime rose. Many of the projects in this arguably failed ‘master-plan’ became derelict and were eventually demolished.  This piece clashes an archival photo of the mayor and developers hovering over an architectural model of a super-block, with an image of the demolition one of their planned developments.

nether410 Rising and Raising of the super block Baltimore Based Nether 410 Brings his Vision to Chicago    in <em>Lets Talk About It</em> at Galerie F and with Pablo Machioli on the Streets of Pilsen

Baptized into the Movement, close-up, Digital print, 11″x17″

A young kid pouring a bottle of water over his face following being tear-gassed in Ferguson.

Nether410 Baptized Into The Movement artwork Baltimore Based Nether 410 Brings his Vision to Chicago    in <em>Lets Talk About It</em> at Galerie F and with Pablo Machioli on the Streets of Pilsen

Candlelight Protest, Digital print, 17″X11″

From a photo I took during the first Freddie Gray candle light vigil protest. Three generations of Baltimoreans witnessing the beauty of the struggle. That evening changed the entire trajectory of the movement.

Nether410 Candlelight Protest graphic art Baltimore Based Nether 410 Brings his Vision to Chicago    in <em>Lets Talk About It</em> at Galerie F and with Pablo Machioli on the Streets of Pilsen

And on the streets of Pilsen with Pablo Machioli:

The Taming of the Bull

As part of a collaboration with Pablo Machioli.  Painted from ground with mini rollers, a statue of Hercules wrestling a Bull in Pilsen, a South Side-neighborhood  being redeveloped. The figure taming the bull is blinded by gold while the bull is being pierced by an arrow — shot through the Robert Taylor Homes — into his throat. Between 1950 and 1969, Chicago’s Housing Authority built 11 enormous high rise projects for public housing, which isolated most of the extreme poor in “super-blocks”. Many of the projects in this failed ‘master-plan’ were almost intentionally underfunded, became derelict, were demolished, and now, of course, the surrounding neighborhoods are being redeveloped for a different population

Nether410 and pablo machioli street art chicago  Baltimore Based Nether 410 Brings his Vision to Chicago    in <em>Lets Talk About It</em> at Galerie F and with Pablo Machioli on the Streets of Pilsen

Close-up

Nether taming the bull close up Baltimore Based Nether 410 Brings his Vision to Chicago    in <em>Lets Talk About It</em> at Galerie F and with Pablo Machioli on the Streets of Pilsen

Let’s Talk About It continues through September 18th at Galerie F. Located at 2381 N Milwaukee Ave, it is open Tuesday through Sunday, 11AM – 6PM

Images of artworks courtesy Galerie F

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keith Haring city kids mural art copy <em>Truth to Power</em> Showcases Socially Engaged Art: Keith Haring, Mear One, Beau Stanton, Shepard Fairey, Lmnopi, Mata Ruda and more

Coinciding with the Democratic National Convention, the non-profit Rock The Vote launched its Truth to Power campaign in Philadelphia earlier this week. Among its events was a three-day pop-up art exhibit featuring a varied range of socially and politically engaged works in different media. Among the artists who participated are many whose works have also surfaced in public spaces. Pictured above is Keith Haring with the City Kids Foundation. Here are several more:

Mear One, False Profits

Mear One political art <em>Truth to Power</em> Showcases Socially Engaged Art: Keith Haring, Mear One, Beau Stanton, Shepard Fairey, Lmnopi, Mata Ruda and more

Beau Stanton, Elemental Crisis 

beau stanton political art <em>Truth to Power</em> Showcases Socially Engaged Art: Keith Haring, Mear One, Beau Stanton, Shepard Fairey, Lmnopi, Mata Ruda and more

Shepard Fairey aka Obey

Obey political art <em>Truth to Power</em> Showcases Socially Engaged Art: Keith Haring, Mear One, Beau Stanton, Shepard Fairey, Lmnopi, Mata Ruda and more

Lmnopi, Tehrir

lmnopi political art <em>Truth to Power</em> Showcases Socially Engaged Art: Keith Haring, Mear One, Beau Stanton, Shepard Fairey, Lmnopi, Mata Ruda and more

Mata Ruda, How Can I Write My Own Future with My Hands Bound?

mata ruda political art <em>Truth to Power</em> Showcases Socially Engaged Art: Keith Haring, Mear One, Beau Stanton, Shepard Fairey, Lmnopi, Mata Ruda and more

Photo credits: 1-3, 5 & 6 Lois Stavsky; 4 Sara Ching Mozeson

Note: Hailed in a range of media from the Huffington Post to the New York Times, our Street Art NYC App is now available for Android devices here.

en play badge 2 <em>Truth to Power</em> Showcases Socially Engaged Art: Keith Haring, Mear One, Beau Stanton, Shepard Fairey, Lmnopi, Mata Ruda and more

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A member of the Pyramid Lake Paiute Tribe, Colorado-based Gregg Deal is an accomplished muralist, painter and performance artist. I first encountered his artwork awhile back on the grounds of the EBC High School For Public Service in Bushwick, Brooklyn. This past weekend, I met him down in DC at the Smithsonian Arts & Industries Building, where he was one of 40 artists featured in CrossLines, presented by the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center.

Gregg Deal at Smithsonian Painter and Performance Artist Gregg Deal on Silenced Indigenous Voices

What spurred you to so fervently embrace your Native American identity?

I don’t know that I specifically embrace it. It is just one of my many identities. I am, foremost, a human being. I am also an artist, a husband and a father.

gregg deal portrait face Painter and Performance Artist Gregg Deal on Silenced Indigenous Voices

You are sitting here in a tipi. What does this particular setting represent?

This tipi represents Washington DC. It is where museums, politics, sports and commerce all contribute to a view of Native Americans.

gregg deal tipi Painter and Performance Artist Gregg Deal on Silenced Indigenous Voices

What about the paintings inside this tipi? How did you decide which to include?

I had to include works that would be acceptable to the Smithsonian. They had to be safe. And so I chose identifiable stereotypes of Native Americans — the only image most others have of us.

And as today’s event progresses, you continue to cross out the mouths of your portraits with bold red lines.

Yes! That is because of voices our censored. We have not been permitted to speak for ourselves. I, myself, have been censored.

gregg deal censorship Painter and Performance Artist Gregg Deal on Silenced Indigenous Voices

What about your interpreter? You often speak through an interpreter.

That is because our lives — our experiences, feelings and thoughts —  are almost always interpreted through others. Authentic indigenous voices have yet to be heard or recognized.

gregg deal portrait crosslines smithsonian Painter and Performance Artist Gregg Deal on Silenced Indigenous Voices

You are certainly creating awareness of that here.

Photo credits: 1, 2, 4 & 5 Lois Stavsky; 3 Sara C. Mozeson; interview by Lois Stavsky

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greg auerbach artists for Bernie Sanders <em>The Art of a Political Revolution</em> Continues Through 7:00 PM Today at 312 Bowery with: Greg Auerbach, Brian Blue, Claw Money, Rostarr, Patrick Martinez, Dan Buller and more

Featuring dozens of national and local artists whose work is inspired by the political landscape, the Artists for Bernie Sanders national touring exhibit, The Art of a Political Revolution, continues through 7:00 PM this evening at 312 Bowery. While visiting yesterday, I had the opportunity to speak to its principal curator, Tyler Gibney of HVW8 Gallery.

bryan blue the art of political revolution <em>The Art of a Political Revolution</em> Continues Through 7:00 PM Today at 312 Bowery with: Greg Auerbach, Brian Blue, Claw Money, Rostarr, Patrick Martinez, Dan Buller and more

There is such a wonderful range of socially conscious art on exhibit here.  While some of the artworks directly reference Bernie Sanders, others touch on an array of social, political and economic issues. How did this all happen?

Bernie Sanders has always been a strong supporter of the arts. And soon after he appointed Luis Calderin – with whom I’ve worked in the past — as Director of Arts and Culture, Luis and I started working on launching this exhibit.

How were you able to engage such a diverse group of outstanding artists — many working in different media?

Both Luis and I had worked with many of the same artists when Obama was first running for President.  Several of these artists have also shown in my gallery. And in addition to the artists we both knew, many approached us — eager to participate.

claw money the art of political revolution <em>The Art of a Political Revolution</em> Continues Through 7:00 PM Today at 312 Bowery with: Greg Auerbach, Brian Blue, Claw Money, Rostarr, Patrick Martinez, Dan Buller and more

So many artists — of all ages — are supportive of Bernie. Why do you suppose this is so?

Bernie can be counted on to advocate for funding of the arts in our cities, schools and public spaces. He clearly understands the importance of the arts and has a proven record of supporting the arts. Artists can also easily relate to his values. Bernie takes no corporate donations.

And how might you explain his appeal to so many young people?

Many young people are feeling the need for a political revolution in this country. They graduate school with thousands of dollars in debt.  They witness a gross inequality of income. They see homeless people living on the streets in the richest country in the world. And with Bernie these issues come into the open.

rostarr and patrick martinez the art of political revolution <em>The Art of a Political Revolution</em> Continues Through 7:00 PM Today at 312 Bowery with: Greg Auerbach, Brian Blue, Claw Money, Rostarr, Patrick Martinez, Dan Buller and more

How did the opening of this exhibit here in NYC go?

It was amazing! We knew that Bernie’s wife and son would be here. But we didn’t quite expect him. He’d just been visiting the Vatican hours earlier! And so when he arrived, we were thrilled!

And are you satisfied with the response the exhibit is getting here in NYC!

Absolutely!

Dan Bullerartists for bernie sanders <em>The Art of a Political Revolution</em> Continues Through 7:00 PM Today at 312 Bowery with: Greg Auerbach, Brian Blue, Claw Money, Rostarr, Patrick Martinez, Dan Buller and more

The Art of A Political Revolution  –  produced by Bernie 2016, with support from HVW8 Gallery, Creative Cabal, The GoodLife! & Evolutionary Media Group – is open to the public today from 10:30am – 7pm.

Artist signings: Aaron Draplin from 11:00 AM – 1:00 PM; Jermaine Rogers from 1:00 – 3:00 PM and Claw Money from 3:00 – 5:00 PM

Photos by Lois Stavsky; interview conducted by Lois Stavsky with Houda Lazrak and edited by Lois Stavsky

Images

1. Greg Auerbach

2. Brian Blue

3. Claw Money

4. Rostarr  & Patrick Martinez

5. Dan Buller

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This is Part III in an ongoing series of posts featuring politically and socially conscious artworks that have surfaced on NYC streets:

Kingbee and Tito Na Rua take on gentrification in the Bronx

King Bee and tito narua street art nyc Politically and Socially Conscious NYC Street Art, Part III: Kingbee with Tito Na Rua, Hanksy, Groundswell Youth with Danielle McDonald & Jazmine Hayes, Hunt Rodriguez and Sophia Dawon

Hanksy‘s famed portrait of Donald Trump in Downtown Manhattan

hanksy street art NYC Politically and Socially Conscious NYC Street Art, Part III: Kingbee with Tito Na Rua, Hanksy, Groundswell Youth with Danielle McDonald & Jazmine Hayes, Hunt Rodriguez and Sophia Dawon

Groundswell youth  – with lead artist Danielle McDonald and assistant artist Jazmine Hayes – in Bed-Stuy 

groundswell public art mural NYC Politically and Socially Conscious NYC Street Art, Part III: Kingbee with Tito Na Rua, Hanksy, Groundswell Youth with Danielle McDonald & Jazmine Hayes, Hunt Rodriguez and Sophia Dawon

Hunt Rodrigues on the pavement in Bushwick

hunt rodriguez bushwick pavement art copy Politically and Socially Conscious NYC Street Art, Part III: Kingbee with Tito Na Rua, Hanksy, Groundswell Youth with Danielle McDonald & Jazmine Hayes, Hunt Rodriguez and Sophia Dawon

Sophia Dawson  on Myrtle Avenue — with quote from Assata Shakur – for Black Artstory Month

Sophia dawson street art nyc Politically and Socially Conscious NYC Street Art, Part III: Kingbee with Tito Na Rua, Hanksy, Groundswell Youth with Danielle McDonald & Jazmine Hayes, Hunt Rodriguez and Sophia Dawon

Photo credits: 1 & 5 Lois Stavsky; 2, 3 & 4 Tara Murray

Note: Our highly acclaimed Street Art NYC App is now available for Android devices here.

en play badge 2 Politically and Socially Conscious NYC Street Art, Part III: Kingbee with Tito Na Rua, Hanksy, Groundswell Youth with Danielle McDonald & Jazmine Hayes, Hunt Rodriguez and Sophia Dawon

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Issam Kourbaj Another Day Lost Art Installation Syrian Artist Issam Kourbajs Installation <em>Another Day Lost</em> Continues through January 5 on the Grounds of Trinity Church in Lower Manhattan

Since 2011, over 10 million Syrians have been uprooted from their homes. Another Day Losta mixed-media installation by Syrian UK-based artist Issam Kourbaj, offers a powerful look into the crisis crippling his homeland.

Issam Kourbaj calligraphy Another Day Lost Syrian Artist Issam Kourbajs Installation <em>Another Day Lost</em> Continues through January 5 on the Grounds of Trinity Church in Lower Manhattan

Inspired by the aerial imagery of the refugee camps in the Jordanian desert, the artist fashioned his installation — reflecting on the lives of refugees living in tents — from waste materials, such as medicine packaging and discarded books.

Issam Kourbaj tent installation close up Syrian Artist Issam Kourbajs Installation <em>Another Day Lost</em> Continues through January 5 on the Grounds of Trinity Church in Lower Manhattan

Each day of the installation, another match is lit and then blown out to mark one more day of Syria’s devastation.

Issam Kourbaj matches installation Syrian Artist Issam Kourbajs Installation <em>Another Day Lost</em> Continues through January 5 on the Grounds of Trinity Church in Lower Manhattan

U.S. residents visiting the site are invited to compose and electronically submit a letter to their elected representatives encouraging them to support increasing the number of Syrian refugees admitted to the U.S.

Issam Kourbaj Syrian Artist Issam Kourbajs Installation <em>Another Day Lost</em> Continues through January 5 on the Grounds of Trinity Church in Lower Manhattan

On the grounds of Trinity Church — at the intersection of Broadway and Wall Street in Lower Manhattan – Another Day Lost can be viewed through January 5th.

Note: This post was written in collaboration with Kristin L. Wolfe.

Photo credits: 1, 3 & 4 Dani Reyes Mozeson; 2 & 5 Kristin L. Wolfe

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