Phetus

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A remarkable museum, featuring the artwork of dozens of street artists, muralists, graffiti writers and bombers, is underway in the least likely spot –a 300-year-old historic Glen Cove, Long Island mansion. While visiting this designated city landmark last week, I had the chance to speak to Sean Sullivan aka Layer Cake, who is actively engaged in the transformation of this 9000-square foot site that was once home to one of the five founding families of the city of Glen Cove.

This is remarkable? Whose concept was this?

Joe LaPadula — known among us for his fabulous cutting-edge urban art car projects — knew about this site and saw its potential to serve as a platform to introduce his favorite art form to the public.

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How did you become involved with it?

I did a Ferrari hood for Joe’s project, and we discovered that we share a similar vision. And then I involved Harris Lobel who has done a great job overseeing the Drip Project in Mount Vernon’s Mes Hall.

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This home is the centerpiece of the First City Project – which has also engaged artists in painting in public spaces. What is the goal of this project?

There are many. The First City Project‘s principal goal is introduce the residents of the City of Glen Cove and surrounding communities to the next generation of urban-themed artists.

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When did the transformation of this site begin?

The actual painting began on May 2. I was, in fact, the first artist to paint here.

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There is such a wildly diverse mix of art here. How were you able to engage such a variety of artists?

At first I reached out to those I know and like. And then it was a matter of word of mouth, as artists connected to one another.

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What are some of the challenges you’ve encountered in seeing this through?

Working with such a varied range of artists with so many different personalities is, in itself, a challenge. But immediate ones that come to mind are: artists not showing up on time; having to stay up far too late and the inevitable politics that comes with it all.

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What’s ahead for the First City Project?

Live art events, gallery exhibits, more outdoor mural projects that engage the community — particularly the youth — student art classes and more.

It’s very exciting! Good luck with it all! And we look forward to news about upcoming events.

Images:

1. Phetus

2. Such

3. Reaps

4. Sean Sullivan aka Layer Cake

5. Ellis G

6. Chris RWK, Nite Owl, Zero Productivity and Easy

7. Pase

Photos and interview by Lois Stavsky

Note: Hailed in a range of media from the Huffington Post to the New York Times, our Street Art NYC App is now available for Android devices here.

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This is the eleventh in a series of occasional posts featuring the art that has surfaced on NYC shutters:

Eelco on the Lower East Side 

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Crash and Bio on the Lower East Side

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Moody Mutz on the Lower East Side

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Phetus at the Bushwick Collective

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Jules Muck aka MuckRock with the Welling Court Mural Project in Astoria, Queens

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Photo credits: 1, 4 & 5 Tara Murray; 2 Dani Reyes Mozeson & 3 courtesy of John Woodward

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This past Friday, we visited Fillin Global’s inaugural showing of curated art at Castle Fitzjohns on the Lower East Side. Featuring a diverse range of creative artworks by over two dozen artists in different media, the exhibit exudes a wonderfully expressive energy. Among the artists whose works we saw are many who also bring their talents to our city’s streets. While there, we had the opportunity we had the opportunity to speak to Thomas Feinstein — of Fillin Global — who curated the exhibit with co-curator Jackie Collins.

This exhibit is amazing! There are so many different styles and techniques represented here, and everything seems to work together. Just what is Fillin Global?

FILLIN is an artist agency, representing innovative artists from across the globe.

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How did you get such a varied, talented group of artists together in one setting? 

Many are friends. Some I’ve known from my childhood growing up in Long Island. Let’s just say I was a bad kid!

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How long did it take you to get this exhibit together?

I began working two months ago for a February 19 launch. But during the final week, I barely slept at all.

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 What were some of the challenges that came your way in getting this all together?

The biggest challenge was working with such a wide range of styles and media and making it all flow.

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How have folks responded to the exhibit?

They love it!

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 What’s ahead?

We are planning an event in a huge warehouse where artists will be able to paint directly on the walls. It will take place this summer.

That sounds great! Good luck and congratulations on this inaugural show.

Note: Today, Sunday, Feb 28, is the final day to check out the Fillin Global’s inaugural exhibit. The gallery — located at 98 Orchard Street — will remain open until 10pm.

Images:

1. Giz & Ghost, Untitled

2. Such, The Big ‘H’

3. JA & Giz, Tabs of the Rising Sun

4. Marc Evan, Limitless Undying Love

5. Dain, I Wasted Time on You

6. Phetus, Untitled

Photo credits: 1, 3 & 6 Tara Murray; 2 & 5 Dani Reyes Mozeson and 4 Lois Stavsky

More artworks and info about them can be seen here.

Note: Hailed in a range of media from the Huffington Post to the New York Times, our Street Art NYC App is now available for Android devices here.

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Writing onthe Walls is an ongoing project launched last year by N Carlos J – noted artist, community revitalizer and founder of Brooklyn Is the Future — for his father, a Brownsville native who had been diagnosed with cancer. This is Part II of our continuing documentation of it:

Danish artist Welin

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Brooklyn-based Ben Angotti

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French artist Zeso, close-up

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Chilean artist Teo Doro

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Long Island-based Phetus

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And you can find out here how you can help support this wonderfully transformative project.

Note: The first image is by Joel Bergner aka Joel Artista.

Photo credits: 1, 2, 4-6 Tara Murray; 3 Lois Stavsky

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Designed to link artists with schools, Project BrookLYNK has transformed EBC High School for Public Service in Bushwick into an exuberant outdoor/indoor gallery. We recently visited the school and spoke to Project BrookLYNK director, Thomas Gleisner aka Tommy Gee.

What a wonderful space! How lucky these students, teachers and staff members are! What exactly is your role in making this happen? And what is your relationship to this school?

I engage the artists, oversee the execution of the murals and organize a range of activities related to the artworks. I also teach art and Special Education.

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 When did it all begin? 

The first mural inside our building, Black Lives Matter — painted by Bevon Brewster — surfaced over four months ago.  Then in June, Melbourne-based artists-in-residence Geoffrey Carran and Rowena Martinich involved our students in painting murals and instructed them in a variety of art activities. Since then, it’s been an ongoing project.

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How has your principal responded to this intitiative?

Our principal, Shawn Brown, loves it. I’ve known him since 2010, when we worked together at another high school in Brooklyn. We share a similar educational vision.

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And how have the students and faculty members reacted?

Most haven’t seen all of the art yet. But their response to what they did see was positive. The students love it. And the teachers were quite surprised at first, but their response has also been positive.

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How have you managed to involve so many artists — and so many celebrated street artists?

Some are friends; others are friends of friends, and some are referred to me.

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 What’s ahead?

More murals, more artists’ residencies and more community engagement and collaborative projects here at EBC High School for Public Service. And I would, also, like to expand Project BrookLYNK to other schools in the fall.

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That would be great! We are looking forward to seeing more!

Note: The murals pictured above are a small sampling of the dozens of pieces in disparate styles by local, national and international artists that can be seen inside and outside EBC High School for Public Service located at 1155 Dekalb Avenue in Bushwick, Brooklyn. More info and links here, and keep posted to our Facebook page for many more images.

Murals: 1. Geoffrey Carran and Rowena Martinich 2. D. Gale 3. Rob Plater 4  Nepo 5. Hori Shin 6. See One 7Phetus

Photos: 1-4 Lois Stavsky; 5-7 Tara Murray

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The first day of spring 2015 brought wintry snow to NYC. Here are a few images I captured while in Greenpoint for the day:

 Phetus

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Matthew Denton Burrows

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Cern

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Tone

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 Faring Purth

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ShiroYes One and Tone MST

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To be identified

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 Miro RIS (& Shiro, top right)

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Photos by Lois Stavsky

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The now-iconic trailer on First Street and First Avenue is undergoing yet another transformation. For its current cycle, Cycle 11, the Centre-fuge Public Art Project invited artists who’ve painted there this past year to return. Here are a few images captured earlier in the week from the still-in-progress huge, energetic collage of distinct styles.

 Matthew Denton Burrows at work; Damien Miksza on left; Phetus on right

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Phetus with Nicole Salgar & Chuck Berrett on right

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 CS-Navarrete at work

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Mor

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Joseph Meloy

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Demer

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Royce Bannon with Miishab on right

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ElleDamien Mitchell and Korn

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Keep posted to our Facebook page for more photos of the completed pieces.

Photo of  CS-Navarrete at work by Lois Stavsky; all others by Dani Reyes Mozeson

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This is the third in an ongoing series featuring the range of faces that surface daily on NYC’s public spaces:

Pose and Revok on the Bowery and Houston, close-up

Pose and Revok

Argentinian artist Ever on Williamsburg rooftop, close-up

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Australian artist Vexta at Welling Court in Astoria, Queens

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Cern on truck spotted on Manhattan’s Upper West Side

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Mata Ruda and ND’A at Welling Court in Astoria, Queens

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Crystal Clarity on Lower East Side rooftop

Crystal Clarity

Danielle Mastrion with signature by El Niño de las Pinturas at 5Pointz in Long Island City, Queens

Danielle Mastrion

 Phetus in Bushwick, Brooklyn

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Photos by Lenny Collado, Dani Mozeson, Tara Murray & Lois Stavsky

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This is the fifth in an occasional series of artwork on NYC shutters.

Kenji Takabayashi at Welling Court in Astoria, Queens

Kenji Takabayashi

Kosby at Welling Court in Astoria, Queens

Kosby

Zam Art at Welling Court in Astoria, Queens

Zam

Sheryo and the Yok in Manhattan’s Little Italy

Sheryo and the Yok

Phetus in Williamsburg, Brooklyn

Phetus

Hef atWelling Court in Astoria, Queens

Hef

Joseph Meloy at Welling Court in Astoria, Queens

Joe Meloy

Fumero in NoLita

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Wisher914 at Welling Court in Astoria, Queens

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Photos by Tara Murray and Lois Stavsky

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Fueled by their love of art and their passion to promote the art they love, Brian Jerkface and Iman Johnson are busy curating some of NYC’s coolest art events. On a recent visit to their current art show at NoBar at 608 Nostrand Ave. in Brooklyn, we had the opportunity learn a bit about the two talented young men and their upcoming projects.

Phetus

How did this all begin?

Brian: We both love street art and we wanted to share our love with others in alternative settings. It’s great fun, and it’s also a way to help artists, particularly those who work in public spaces, make a living.  Only by selling their art can they continue to pursue their passion.

Do you have a formal art education?

Iman: I attended Cooper Union. My degree is in architecture.

Brian: I studied painting and graphic design at the School of Visual Arts.

Have you any favorite artists?

Iman: My all-time favorite artist is the British painter Francis Bacon.  I also love Lebbeus Woods, a conceptual architect, who was one of my teachers at Cooper Union.  And I love what See One is doing on the streets.

Brian: I love the Cubist style of the Spanish painter Juan Gris. He’s a definite influence on my work. Among those artists who work on the streets, I have many favorites. Among them are: NoseGo, Phetus and Bishop.

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What attracted you to street art and graffiti?

Brian:  I grew up listening to hip-hop, and I fell in love with graffiti. When I was about 16, I picked up a spray-can.  I was also into skateboarding.

Iman: Yes, it was the entire culture that drew us in.

What do you see as the future of street art?

Brian:  As it continues to make its mark in both sanctioned and unsanctioned spaces, I see it as getting better and better all the time.

Iman:  Yes, it seems to be in an ideal place right now. While becoming more acceptable, it’s still on the edge and is almost certain to remain so. Most of it will continue to push against authority.

Your current art exhibit here at NoBar is wonderful.  What is the appeal of this particular setting?

Brian:  It’s a wonderful spot, and the neighborhood is easily accessible.  We love the mix of people it attracts, and it is street art-friendly. It allows us to feature live painting at our openings – something we both love.

What’s ahead?  Any other exhibits coming up at NoBar?

Brian:  Yes. Cosbe will be painting live here for our next exhibit on Friday, March 29.  And Deps is among the artists we are featuring in our show opening April 26.

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That sounds great! What about other venues? Anything else coming up elsewhere?

Brian:  We are in the process of curating a skate deck exhibit featuring dozens of artists – including Bishop,  Phetus and Col Wallnuts – that will open on April 20th at the Loom Gallery on Flushing Avenue in Bushwick.

Iman:  And we have a number of events coming up in Studio J, our Long Island City space – including a group show, a solo show by Phetus and a kids’ class in street art.

Wow! So much happening! How do you get the word out?

Brian: We get the news of our events out on Instagram and Facebook. We also hand out flyers.

Good luck! We are looking forward to your next event!

Photo of Phetus close-up by Lois Stavsky; Jerkface images courtesy of  POPUP X NYC

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