Magda Love

Hosted by Phillips Auction House on #GIVINGTUESDAY, November 27, Cool Culture presents an evening of food, open bar, dancing, raffles, along with sounds by DJ Paz and interactive art by Magda Love. And it’s all for a fabulous cause!

Each year Cool Culture partners with 90 cultural institutions — from museums to botanical gardens — and over 450 schools to provide free and unlimited arts access to 50,000 NYC families.

And in our current political climate, culture matters — perhaps, more now than ever. Next Tuesday evening’s #GIVEtoGET2018 is the ideal way to support a fabulous organization, while having a fabulous time!

Date: Tuesday, November 27, 2018

Time: 6:30 PM to 9:30 PM

Location: Phillips Auction House 450 Park Avenue (between 56 & 57th street)

Ticket: Purchase provides you with access to an open bar and appetizer

You can purchase tickets here. We are only 10 days away from #GIVEtoGET2018

All images courtesy Cool Culture; the third image was photographed at the Queens Museum by Margarita Corporan

{ 0 comments }

Teeming with color and charm, the huge wall at City-As-School on Hudson Street between Clarkson and West Houston in the West Village has been the talk of the town. I had the opportunity to visit it while it was still in progress and speak to CAS educator Maria Krajewski, who’s been devotedly involved with this project since it first began.

When did this impressive project begin?

Magda Love actually started her mural in May, 2016. But due to permitting issues, the painting had to be stopped four days after it had begun. We were told that we needed formal approval not only from the Department of Education, but, also, from the Department of Environmental Protection.  About 25 people in the DOE and DEP had to approve the process. We had to work out insurance, liability, releases… That took about a year. We were so grateful to get the permit!

What is happening here is described as a project of the Mad Academy that you had co-founded. Just what is the Mad Academy?

It is a pre-professional training initiative that was developed as a collaboration among students, teachers and mentors. Its goal is to provide CAS students direct training in design, arts and music under the guidance of NYC’s top creative industry professionals.

I know that Magda Love has been involved with City-as-School now for several years. I remember the first mural that she had painted here. But how did you engage the Brazilian muralist Eduardo Kobra? His popular appeal is enormous!

Eduardo Kobra’s team actually approached us, as it was a great opportunity for him to paint on such a huge wall adjacent to a school building and to engage with students.

Working on a project this enormous must have posed many challenges. What were some of the main ones?

The enormous bureaucracy that confronted us in obtaining the necessary permissions to seeing it through was our greatest challenge. And funding, of course was another huge challenge. Once we got the permit, we didn’t have any money! When Lisi Gehrend joined the team to fundraise as part of her Master’s Degree in Art, Law and Business at Christie’s Education, the largest mural in NYC was finally underway

You’ve had quite a team. And how has the response been — from students and the community?

It’s been amazing. The community loves it, as do the students. They are, in fact, painting their own murals now on our building.

Congratulations! It is amazing! And it’s so wonderful how it all came together.

Images:

1 & 2 Magda Love

3 Al Diaz

4 Eduardo Kobra & team

5 City-As-School  students Charlie Federico & Kaira Wong

Photos by Lois Stavsky

Note: Hailed in a range of media from WideWalls to the Huffington Post to the New York Times, our Street Art NYC App is now available for Android devices here.

en-play-badge 2

{ 0 comments }

toofly-mural-welling-court-NYC

Organized by Garrison & Alison Buxton, the Welling Court Mural Project is back gracing Welling Court and its neighboring blocks in Astoria, Queens with a wonderfully diverse array of artworks. Here is a sampling of some of the completed murals, along with others in progress, as artists ready for tomorrow’s official launch and block party.

Miro 

miro-graffiti-welling-court-nyc

Mr June

Mr-June-street-art-welling-court-nyc

Billy Mode and Chris Stain

Billy-Mode-and-Chris-Stain-Welling-Court-Mural-Project-street-art-NYC

Daze and Crash

daze-and-crash-welling-court-mural-project-nyc

Vagabonddom at work

Vagabonddom-welling-court-mural-project-nyc

Tamara Heller for Crisis Text Line

tamara-Heller-welling-court-mural-nyc

OneL NYC checking out his mural

Onel-mural-art-welling-court-nyc

Magda Love, with her assistant Jamie, at work

magda-love-paints-welling-court-nyc

You can view the murals, meet the artists and join the festivities tomorrow — Saturday — from 12-8 along 30th Ave and 12th Street and neighboring blocks.

First image features Toofly, work in progress to be completed tomorrow, Saturday

Photo credits: 1, 2 4-9 Tara Murray; 3 Lois Stavsky

Note: Hailed in a range of media from the Huffington Post to the New York Times, our Street Art NYC App is now available for Android devices here.

en-play-badge 2

{ 0 comments }

Argentine artist Magdalena Marcenaro aka Magda Love shares with us some of her early experiences and impressions of NYC in this second in our series of interviews with artists born abroad who have made NYC home.

Magda-Love-street-art-Brooklyn-NYC

When did you first visit New York City?

I first came here in 2000 with a bag and $300. My uncle had paid for my ticket.

What was your initial impression of this city?

I wasn’t impressed! I was raised in Buenos Aires, a similarly large city. And large cities don’t move me that much. I’m far more impressed by nature.  And I always thought of Europe as far cooler than the United States, as Europeans seem to value culture more than Americans do. London seemed like the ideal place to live because I was into fashion at the time.

Magda-Love-street-art-NYC-close-up

Why, then, did you decide to stay in NYC?

Just about everyone was telling me that NYC is the place to be, and then four months later, I was married.

How did your family feel about your move?

My mother was very supportive. She raised me to be independent. She, herself, is very adventurous.

Magda-Love-art-exhibit

What were some of the challenges you faced when you first came here –before you were married?

My biggest challenge was finding a place to live.  When I first arrived, I called a friend I’d met in Argentina and I spent my first two weeks in her place on Roosevelt Island. There was a huge snowstorm at the time. I can’t forget that! I had never seen snow in Buenos Aires. I then worked in a hostel on 106th Street and Central Park West in exchange for a place to sleep. After that, I just crashed in lots of different spaces, wherever anyone had a spare bed.

That must have been difficult.

Yes, I remember spending an entire night on a computer in Times Square checking for possible rentals.  For a while I ended up renting a room in Alphabet City. It was in the Projects on Avenue D. I didn’t even know what the Projects were. And there I was — walking around in a fur coat! And as my Spanish is so different from that of the people living in the Projects, I could barely communicate with anyone. And, of course, dealing with paper work that any newcomer to the US has to deal with is always a challenge.

magda-love-art-at-welling-court

How did you meet your basic expenses early on?

I first worked in a coffee shop, and then I worked as a bartender. I also sold some clothes I’d made to Patricia Field. Back in Buenos Aires, I designed fashion.

Have you encountered any prejudice here?

Not here in NYC. Living in this city is like living in a bubble. But when I’m with my son  – who is biracial – outside of NYC, I do feel prejudice.

Magda-Love-Cobble-Hill-street-art-NYC

How has your artwork evolved or changed since you moved here?

It changes all the time. I feel that I’ve grown tremendously. Being around so many talented artists – especially those who paint on the streets  — exposed me to so much. It has helped me develop different techniques.

Have New Yorkers been receptive to your artwork?

Yes. I’ve been fortunate.

Magda-love-close-up-collate-at-Nu-Hotel-NYC

What would you like to accomplish here?

I’m eager to paint a huge wall. I want to collaborate with some of my favorite artists. And I’d love to have a solo show. Actually, my goal is to conquer the world!

What do you miss most about your native country?

I miss seeing my brother’s kids grow up and I miss the countryside.

Magda-sneaker-art

Do you see yourself living here on a permanent basis or returning to your country?

I’m here to stay!

Interview conducted by Lois Stavsky and City-as-School intern Zachariah Messaoud; photo credits: 1, 2, 5 & 7 Zachariah Messaoud; 3 Dani Reyes Mozeson; 4 Tara Murray & 6 Lois Stavsky

{ 0 comments }

frank-lexi-Bella-Kosbe-the-best -of-the-worst

The following guest post is by Houda Lazrak, a graduate student in Museum Studies at New York University.  

This past weekend, Hanksy’s much-anticipated show, The Best of the Worst, drew hundreds of street art fans to the former Chase Bank at 104 Delancey Street on Manhattan’s Lower East Side. Along with some of NYC’s most notable graffiti writers and street artists, Hanksy transformed the space into a NYC playground-like arena — with a skate ramp, a Chinese massage parlor and more wonderfully-engaging site-specific installations. Dozens of intriguing, overlapping pieces, paste-ups and stickers paid homage to street art, while, also, poking fun at the scene.

Miss Zukie

Miss-Zukie-

CB23 

CB23

Magda Love and Hanksy and more

Magda-Love

Meres and more

Meres-the best-of-the-worst

Russell King, Col and UR New York

Russell-King-& more

Hanksy

Hanksy-the best of the-worst

Included, too, was a rather formally installed art exhibit in the wittily-titled Gag-Osian Gallery featuring some of NYC’s most popular street artists.

Mr. Toll at the Gag-Osian

Mr-toll

El Sol 25 at the Gag-Osian

El-Sol25

All photos by Houda Lazrak; pictured in the first photo are Frank Ape, Lexi Bella and Cosbe

{ 0 comments }

This is the eleventh in a series of occasional posts featuring the diverse range of trucks and vans that strike our streets.

Wane in Manhattan

"Wane graffiti"

Cone in the Bronx

cone-graffiti-truck-bronx-nyc

Magda Love in Bushwick for JMZ Walls

"Magda Love"

Crane in Washington Heights/Inwood

Crane

 Rimx and Seel in Bushwick

rimx-and-seel-van-NYC

Sienide in the Bronx

Sienide

Photo credits: 1. Dani Reyes Mozeson; 2-4 and 6. Lois Stavsky; 5. Tara Murray

{ 0 comments }

With new murals outside and an array of artworks inside, Be Electric Studios on 1298 Willoughby Avenue is the site of a new exhibit featuring over 20 street muralists.  Here are a few images captured hours before it opened last night.

Chris & Veng RWK and Nicole Salgar & Chuck Berrett

robots-will-kill-nichole-salgar-chuck-berret-street-art-murals-NYC

Nicholai Khan at work, FumeroRaquel EchaniqueChris & Veng RWK and Nicole Salgar & Chuck Berrett

 "street Murals"

Magda Love at work

"Magda Love"

Sonni

Sonni

Joseph Meloy

"Joseph Meloy"

Cernesto

Cernesto

And Esteban del Valle adding some finishing touches to his indoor mural

Esteban-del-valle

Curated by Kevin Michael, the exhibit continues through Monday, 12 – 11pm.

Photos by Dani Reyes Mozeson

{ 0 comments }

This is the second in an occasional series featuring images of males who surface on NYC public spaces:

Chris RWK at the Woodward Gallery Project Space on Manhattan’s Lower East Side

Chris RWK

Luv1 at the Bushwick Collective

Luv1

RAE and Abel Macias in Bushwick, Brooklyn

RAE

Zimer does James Gandolfini at the Bushwick Collective

Zimer

Magdalena Marcenaro aka Magda Love in Cobble Hill, Brooklyn

Magda Love street art

The Dude Company does Talib Kweli in DUMBO, Brooklyn

The Dude Company

Owen Dippie in the Tremont section of the Bronx

Owen Dippie

Ces at Hunts Point in the Bronx

Ces

Icy and Sot in Prospect Heights, Brooklyn

Icy and Sot

Photos by Tara Murray and Lois Stavsky

{ 0 comments }

Magda Love

During the past few weeks, Argentinian artist Magdalena Marcenaro aka Magda Love has brought beauty and intrigue to Brooklyn’s Pacific Street with her inventive and infectious murals. We recently met up with Magda and had the opportunity to pose a few questions to her.

When did you first share your vision in a public space?

The first time was earlier this year in Miami’s Arts Wynwood District.

What inspired you to do so?

I was offered a wall, and I was thrilled to have the opportunity.  Growing up in Argentina, I know just how strong the impact of public art can be.

Any early memories of it?

I mostly remember the political slogans that surfaced throughout my native Buenos Aires.

What is your preferred medium for getting up on the streets?

I love wheat pastes. Its ephemeral nature adapts beautifully to the environment.  And it keeps on evolving.

Magda Love

Have you a formal art education?

Not a formal one. But my father is a sculptor, and I grew up among artists.  From an early age, I assisted my father in his studio. He used to tell me, “Magda, you have a special eye, and it will take you far.”  And by age 18, I was working as a fashion designer and photographer and running my own business.

What percentage of your time is devoted to art these days?

Just about all of it! When my 9-year-old son isn’t in school, he’s often with me in my studio.

Have you exhibited your work in galleries?

Yes.  I’ve shown my work in Buenos Aires, New York and in Miami. I had a solo exhibition at Gowanus Print Lab here in Brooklyn. And I’ve also participated in group shows at the Scope Foundation, Miguel Paredes Gallery, Peanut Underground, BOOM, The Brooklyn Waterfront Artists Coalition and The Urban Folk Art Gallery.

Magda Love

What is your main source of income these days?

Art sales and commissions.

Are there any particular themes or ideas that drive your work?

I’m particularly interested in the connections we forge among one another and how we treat each other.

How has your art evolved through the years?

It has reflected my personal growth, as a woman and as a parent.

Do you prefer working alone or collaborating with others?

I haven’t yet collaborated with anyone, but I’d love to.

Magda Love

Do you work from a sketch or do you just let it flow?

I don’t prepare a sketch – but I do have some images with me to give me a basic idea of where I’m going. But once I begin, my work takes on a life of its own.

Are you generally satisfied with your finished piece?

I know the next day.

Any favorite artists – particularly among those whose work you’ve seen on the streets?

Swoon, Rone, Roa, the Fleshbeck Crew, Reka, Lamour Supreme, Faile and Herakut come to mind.

What about cultures that have influenced your aesthetic? Are there any particular ones?

Certainly the Argentinian sensibility and its general openness to art. And from my father I developed a love for traditional German painters.

Magda Love

You moved to NYC 12 years ago. How does the general attitude towards art differ here from back home in Argentina?

Back in Argentina, people are more appreciative of art. There is more emphasis on culture, in general. And there’s more of a collective consciousness that its culture reflects. In Argentina, just about everyone goes to art fairs, not just a select few. But I do love the mix of cultures, along with the art that this mixture produces, here in NYC.

What do you see as the role of the artist in society?

I don’t know if we can change the world, but we can make a difference.

What’s ahead?

I begin working this week with 5th graders at PS 127 on an indoor mural project. This – I hope – will be the first of many collaborations in an educational setting.  And I want to keep working on the streets and travel more in the years ahead. I’d also love to participate in street art festivals and events.

Magda Love

Tomorrow — June 6 from 7:00 P.M.- 8:30 P.M. —  you  can meet Magda, see her new works and view her mural room at Brooklyn’s NU Hotel, as she celebrates the unveiling of her murals commissioned by the Pacific Street Association.

7:00 P.M  Meet-up in lounge of Nu Hotel

7:30 P.M. Walking tour of murals

8:30 P.M. Q&A and NU Hotel mural tour with Magdalena

R.S.V.P. to  Events@independentcollection.com

Photos by Lois Stavsky

{ 2 comments }