graffiti

Launched — once again — by Learn and Skate is an auction to raise funds to help support the production of the first skate park in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia. The skate deck featured above was fashioned by Bronx-based Sen2.  Dozens more skate decks — recently designed by a global array of artists — are available for bidding at Europe’s online auction house Catawiki. What follows is a small sampling:

 Wane COD

Chris RWK, Chinon Maria and Andrea Romero del Collado

Jilly Ballistic

Antonio Sobrino

You can view all of the skate decks and bid on them here.

All images courtesy Jean Claude Geraud

Note: Hailed in a range of media from WideWalls to the Huffington Post to the New York Times, our Street Art NYC App is now available for Android devices here.

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Today, Saturday, June 9th, marks the ninth anniversary of the extraordinary community-driven Welling Court Mural Project, conceived and curated  by Ad Hoc Art. While visiting yesterday, travel and street photographer Karin du Maire aka Street Art Nomad captured several artists at work, as well as a few completed murals. Pictured above is the wonderfully talented Queen Andrea at work. Several more images follow:

John “Crash”  Matos — posing in front of his mural, based on a painting of his from 1980

Lmnopi

Joel Artista and Marc Evan at work on collaborative wall with Chris Soria

Netherlands-based Michel Velt at work

Cey Adams

KingBee at work

Peat Wollaeger aka Eyez

Herb Smith aka Veng, RWK, alongside his mural

Celebrate the launch of this model community-based mural project from 12pm – 8pm today at 11-98 Welling Court in Astoria, Queens. Check here for directions.

Photos by Karin du Maire

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It’s been a busy week at the Bushwick Collective, as arists from near and far ready for its 7th Annual Block Party. Pictured above is Miami-based Dominican artist Ruben Ubiera captured at work. Several more images of new works — mostly in progress — follow:

Long Island-based Reme821 

The masterful Argentine stencil artist Cabaio at work, close-up

Holland-based Mr. June at work, close-up

Brazilian artist Sipros at work

For specific information about the Bushwick Collective’s 7th Annual Block Party, check out its Facebook page.

Photos by Tara Murray

Note: Hailed in a range of media from WideWalls to the Huffington Post to the New York Times, our Street Art NYC App is now available for Android devices here.

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Learn and Skate — an organization dedicated to promoting skateboard culture and education in disadvantaged areas, while encouraging youngsters to pursue their dreams was conceived in France in 2012 by Toulouse-based Jean Claude Geraud, with the assistance of Richard Schenten. After building a skate park in the Ugandan countryside in 2016 with funds raised from auctioning skateboard decks, Learn and Skate is now raising funds to help support the production of the first skate park in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia.

Ride for Mongolia, a charity exhibition dedicated to raising the money to make this happen, will take place from May 28 to June 2 at Manhattan’s MADE Hotel, 44 West 29th Street, with an official opening on May 31 from 6pm to 1am. Dozens of acclaimed artists from a range of countries throughout the globe have fashioned skate decks that will be available in auction. The three decks featured above are the work of the Canadian artist Sandra Chevrier. Several more skateboard decks featured in Ride for Mongolia follow:

The legendary NYC-based Futura, close-up, Gears, Black and white markers on skateboard, 2018

Toulouse, France-based Woizo, Figure – 037 Shakti, Acrylic and oil on skateboard, 2018

Bronx-based legendary graffiti artist, T-Kid, T-Kid, Spray paint and marker on skateboard, 2018

French artist Little Madi, Cactus Love, Acrylic on skateboard, 2018

You can check out all of the details for the NYC exhibit — beginning with its soft opening — here. And you can bid online here from May 29 to June 12.

All images courtesy Jean Claude Geraud

Note: Hailed in a range of media from WideWalls to the Huffington Post to the New York Times, our Street Art NYC App is now available for Android devices here.

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The faces that surface on Miami’s walls — like so much of the art that makes its way onto the city’s public places — represent a wide range of artistic styles, sensibilities and backgrounds. The image featured above was painted by Brooklyn-based artist Isabelle Ewing. Several more images of faces that I captured on my recent visit follow:

Jacksonville, Florida-based Nico

London-based David Walker

Australian artist Seb Humphreys aka Order 55

Miami-based Abstrk

West Coast-based Sauteezy aka A Killer’skiller

Photos by Lois Stavsky

Note: Hailed in a range of media from WideWalls to the Huffington Post to the New York Times, our Street Art NYC App is now available for Android devices here.

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While in Sacramento, California for Wide Open Walls several months ago, travel and street photogapher Karin du Maire aka Street Art Nomad had the opportunity to explore the city’s streets. Pictured above is her capture of a mural painted by Sacramento-based artist Anthony Padilla aka Kinetik Ideas. Several more images — largely fashioned by Sacramento-based artists — follow:

John Horton

Shaun Burner

 Waylon Horner and Shaun Burner

Rime MSK and 18ism aka Host18

Another by Anthony Padilla aka Kinetik Ideas

Photos by Karin du Maire aka Street Art Nomad

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Pictured above is the bold and brightly-hued work of Barcelona native Pez. What follows are several more images of distinctly curious characters that I’ve recently encountered while wandering around Miami’s beguiling streets:

Barcelona-based El Xupet Negre aka the Black Pacifier

Parisian artist Combo aka Combo Culture Kidnapper, close-up

St. Pete, Florida-based Sebastian Coolidge

Mexican artist Curiot

Photos by Lois Stavsky

Note: Hailed in a range of media from WideWalls to the Huffington Post to the New York Times, our Street Art NYC App is now available for Android devices here.

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Growing up in the Bronx in the 70’s  Osvaldo Cruz — under different aliases — began early on tagging and piecing wherever and whenever he could. His subway train art is featured, in fact, in Martha Cooper‘s and Henry Chalfant‘s landmark book, Subway Art. These days, with occasional stints painting legal walls over at Tuff City in the Bronx, Cruz focuses primarily on fashioning abstract — graffiti-inspired — images on canvases and is represented by Fountain House Gallery. An interview with the artist follows:

When and where did you first get up?

It was around 1978. I was eight years old. I lived near Yankee Stadium at the time, and I remember getting my initials, TC –Tito Cruz — up in the yard of P.S. 156, my local elementary school.

Did you have any preferred surfaces?

Anything was fine! I, especially, liked mail trucks.

Who were some of the writers that inspired you back in the day?

I was inspired by the local writers: FDT 56, Hoy 56, Kid 56, Hazzy Haz from the D yard, Blade from the 5 layup, T-Kid from the 1 layup and Flame.

Have you any early memories that stand out?

Meeting Blade in the CC layup on Fordham Road in 1979 and soon after meeting Iz the Wiz up there. They both were already established writers by the time I had hit the subways.

But many memories that are not positive also stand out. One of my favorite graffiti names was GINSU, and that caused a log of turmoil in Chinatown, as all of the the school kids assumed that the tagger was Chinese. There were endless wars and fights back then over everything from copying one’s letters to being in the wrong place at the wrong time. There was too much disrespect. Enough to make some of us stop painting burners – knowing that someone was going to write inside or around our pieces.

Did you get up alone or did you paint together with any crews?

I didn’t paint with any crews, but I did have a sidekick, OHenry. He was my link to many different subway layups and yards. OHenry, though, has lost all interest in spray-painting and in graffiti. He doesn’t even want to talk about it. So when I see him these days, I don’t even bring it up.

Had you ever been arrested back in the day for graffiti?

I was once falsely accused up at the 183rd Street Subway Station. I connected with a Legal Aid lawyer, and the case was dismissed.

What was the riskiest thing you’ve done?

Climbing into a yard up in the North Bronx off the 2 train. The fence was really high, and it was too easy to get tangled up in barbed wire. And I didn’t know who would be there once I made it in.

Do you have a formal art education?

I graduated from Art & Design High School in 1987.

What percentage of your time is devoted to art?

About 75% — whenever I’m not attending to my personal needs, I paint.

Do you make money from your art?

Yes! Through commissions and selling canvases.

At what point did you begin working on canvases?

I actually started to experiment with graffiti art on canvas in the early 80’s, but it wasn’t until 2000 that I began to focus almost exclusively on painting on canvases.

Which mode do you prefer?

I like them both, and I’ve been commissioned to do both.

How do you feel about the engagement of the corporate world with graffiti writers and street artists? 

I have no problem with it. I’m happy for the artists.

Have you shown your work in galleries?

Yes. I’ve shown my work at Fountain House Gallery and at Pace University via Community Access.

Do you work with a sketch in hand or do you let it flow?

No. I don’t work from sketches.

What inspires you these days?

My imagination!

Are you generally satisfied with your finished work?

 Yes!

Are there any particular cultures that influence you at present?

I don’t feel influenced by cultures other than my own, but I like what the European writers are doing. I especially like the Swedish graffiti crew WUFC.

How has your work evolved through the years?

It’s more complex — more sophisticated, and I use more colors.

What’s ahead?

I just want to keep on painting.

Good luck!

All photos courtesy of the artist; interview by Lois Stavsky

Note: Hailed in a range of media from WideWalls to the Huffington Post to the New York Times, our Street Art NYC App is now available for Android devices here.

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The following guest post is by Houda Lazrak

On Christmas Day 2017, while Sydneysiders were enjoying their day off with street cricket and family lunches, I explored the quiet streets of Newtown, Sydney’s hippest inner west neighborhood, in search of some street art. Rife with murals, graffiti and smaller street art pieces, the suburb has a history of embracing public art with large-scale murals erected on neighborhood walls since the late 1980s. The image pictured above is by Ears, who is also a classically trained violinist. Below are several more of many works — painted by an all-Australian cast of artists — that I captured on that cloudy day.

Fintan Magee, Matt Hogan Reserve —  painted through a crowd-funded project arranged by local residents and is titled after the park in which it is located

 Nico

Apeseven, Predators Folly

Phibs 

Phibs and George Rose, Save our Coral Reef — addressing coral bleaching in Australia and around the world, urging all to take active responsibility for the care of our oceans

Close-up

Several murals pictured here were organized through the Perfect Match Public Art Program, an Inner West Council initiative that matches artists’ public art proposals with local residents and business owners who volunteer their walls for transformation.

Note: Hailed in a range of media from WideWalls to the Huffington Post to the New York Times, our Street Art NYC App is now available for Android devices here.

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All photos by Houda Lazrak

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With her deep passion for street art and remarkable knowledge of the Israeli street art scene, Dina Segev is the quintessential street art tour guide. Whether conducting workshops for school-age children, or lecturing adults about graffiti and street art or simply guiding groups of visitors through the streets of Tel Aviv, her enthusiasm is contagious. While in Tel Aviv earlier this year, I had the opportunity to observe Dina as she conducted a tour for school-age children and, then, speak to her.

When did you first become interested in street art?

As an artist, I’d always been interested in art, and I had been giving private lessons to students in my studio for over 20 years. But I wasn’t aware — for quite awhile — what was happening on the streets. One day, a friend gave me a tour of Florentin, along with a spray can, as a birthday present. I instantly fell in love with what I saw. That was back in 2013. I loved it so much, in fact, that I wanted to take my friends on a tour. And so I took 16 friends on a street art tour of Florentin. It was so interesting that my husband asked me to do it for his company’s clients. And soon afterwards, I took my mother – along with her grandchildren – on a steet art tour for her 75th birthday. Two years later, I closed my studio. Now the streets are my studio.

Among those artists whose works you’ve encountered on the streets, do any stand out?

There are many. Among the first generation artists who come to mind are: Klone, Know Hope, Zero Cents, Adi Sened, Latzi, Foma and Ame 72. Second generation artists include: DedeNitzan Mintz, Dioz, Signor GiUntay, Pesh, Minks, Imaginary DuckB.T.W BinskyLord of Lords and ARC D.L.P.  Among the more recent ones are: Solomon Souza, MR, FrenemyMonkey Rmg, Didi, TAG, Murielle, The MisSK and Damian Tab. And Mati Ale who has brought amazing street art projects to Tel Aviv’s Central Bus Station.

And you, yourself, began painting in the streets? When did you start and why?

I began about a year and a half ago. Why? Because I love the idea of connecting with others — even if I never meet them face to face — through my words on the walls.  It is one heart touching another. And — as a result — the anonymous city becomes less anonymous and, maybe, even a bit intimate!

What about the folks — from school children to retirees — who have participated in your tours and workshops? How have they responded to the street art you introduce them to?

They’ve been really appreciative and express great interest in what they see in the streets. Many begin to look at the streets as they never had before.

And what about the artists, themselves? How have they responded to what you are doing?

I’ve developed friendships with many of the artists, and they’ve been supportive of what I do. The artists are not comfortable, though, with those tour guides who lack the knowledge that a street art tour guide should have.

How has the street art scene in Tel Aviv changed since you first started observing it?

While some artists are no longer as active as they used to be, there are many new ones using the streets as their canvas, including more women. There is definitely more of a balance between males and females.

Can you tell us something more about what you offer?

I offer tours for all occasions and all ages. In addition to street art tours in Tel Aviv, Netanya and Jerusalem, I conduct tours of the graffiti exhibitions inside Tel Aviv’s Central Bus Station. I also present graffiti workshops and conduct lectures on the topic in a range of settings.

How can folks join your tours or participate in your workshops?

If you live abroad, you can contact me by email: Disegev@gmail.com. I can also be reached at this phone number: 052-3869500. And if you read and understand Hebrew, you can contact me via my website.

What’s ahead for you? Any long-term plans or goals?

More tours, more workshops and more lectures. And I’d like to travel to share my knowledge of Tel Aviv street art with others in cities throughout the globe. That is my ultimate goal! I’d, also, like to publish a children’s book about graffiti and maybe one for adults, too!

It all sounds great! Good luck!

Photo credits: 1 (with artwork by MR), 4 & 5 Lois Stavsky; 2, 3, 6 & 7 courtesy Dina Segev; interview conducted and edited by Lois Stavsky

Note: Hailed in a range of media from WideWalls to the Huffington Post to the New York Times, our Street Art NYC App is now available for Android devices here.

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