Giz

giz-ghost-RIS-bushwick-collective-museum-2016

While visiting the Bushwick Collective on Thursday as it was readying for its 5th Annual Block Party, we had the opportunity to spend some time in its wondrous pop-up museum at 198 Randolph Street. The brainchild of Bushwick Collective founder Joe Ficalora, it showcases an extraordinary array of works by Bushwick Collective artists, along with art by community members, local youth, Parsons School of Design at the New School students and more.  We also had the chance to speak to the Bushwick Collective Museum‘s director, Asja Gleeson.

asja-gleeson-dan-witz-bushwick-collective-museum_edited-1

This is all so amazing! There are works here by artists who’ve exhibited in museums, along with art by children who live in the neighborhood. Just about every art genre and style is represented here. How did you connect to so many diverse artists?

Joe Ficalora simply gave me a list of the folks he’d already reached out to. In the five years since he’s founded the Bushwick Collective, he’s made so many wonderful connections.

tim-okamura-fine-art-bushwick-collective-gallery

How did you connect to Joe? 

Dan Witz introduced me to Joe two years ago, and I worked with Joe and Dan on the exhibit for the Collective’s 3rd Annual Block Party.  The experience was so fantastic that I was thrilled to have an opportunity to be involved once again with the Bushwick Collective.

enx-bushwick-collective-museum

As director, what are some of your responsibilities in managing an exhibit of this scope?

I had to contact all the artists and make sure that their work arrived in a timely fashion. I assisted Stan Sudol  the director of the Mana Urban Arts Project, in installing the works. And, basically, I was in charge of organizing the exhibit and assuring that it runs smoothly.

What — would you say — was your greatest challenge?

Getting it all together in the span of a week.

anna-orcutt-jahns-art

That’s quite an accomplishment! Have you an academic or professional background in art? 

Both my parents are artists, and I studied Art History and related fields at Bard College at Simon’s Rock. I’ve also worked in several Chelsea galleries.

How does working here differ from working in Chelsea?

It’s more of a labor of love here! The pace is faster, and there’s far more community involvement here in Bushwick than in Chelsea.

Nicer-graffiti-art

What is your impression of the art on exhibit here? Have you any favorites?

I’m so impressed by the quality of it all. There are so many wonderful pieces. Among my favorites is the one by Enx. It speaks to me!

see-one-art

How can folks see this exhibit? It’s an amazing opportunity to not only view such an eclectic selection of quality artworks, but to purchase art at remarkably reasonable prices — with all proceeds going directly to the artists.

It remains open to the public from 10am-5pm through the weekend. 

Images

1.  Giz and Ghost, RIS

2. Dan Witz, with director Asja Gleeson

3. Tim Okamura

4. Enx

5. Anna Orcutt-Jahns

6. Nicer, Tats Cru

7.  See One

Photo credits:  1, 2, 4 – 7 Tara Murray, City-as-School intern Sol Raxlen; interview conducted and edited by Lois Stavsky

Note: Hailed in a range of media from the Huffington Post to the New York Times, our Street Art NYC App is now available for Android devices here.

en-play-badge 2

{ 0 comments }

giz-ghost-such-graffiti-street-art-Bushwick-Collective-NYC

We recently had the opportunity to speak to Bushwick Collective‘s founder and curator, the indefatigable Joe Ficalora, as he readies for this year’s 5th Annual Block Party, June 3-5.

As you prepare for this year’s 5th Annual Block Party, can you share with us some of this past year’s highlights?

Last June’s Annual Block Party was certainly a highlight!  The entire community came together as a family. It was a beautiful sight! A special highpoint of this past year was the Bushwick Collective‘s collaboration with Mana Urban Arts. We had the chance to go down to Miami in December during Art Basel. NYC artists, along with local Miami ones and artists from across the globe, painted together, transforming the inside and outside of the RC Cola Factory. It was a particular thrill to have seven-year-old Lola join us and watch her paint with Chor Boogie. We’ve also facilitated murals in Miami and Jersey City in coordination with Mana Urban Arts. And – more recently — during Frieze Art Week, we participated in Art New York on Pier 54 with Sipros in support of the Perry J. Cohen Foundation.

sipros-street-art-bushwick-collective-nyc

What would you say was your greatest challenge this past year?

My greatest challenge was dealing with all the marketers trying to hunt down walls. Now that this neighborhood is “cool,” they feel that they can take advantage of the public space without giving back.

case-maclaim-mural-art-Bushwick-Collective-NYC

What can we expect at this year’s Block Party?

There will be live painting, food trucks, local vendors, special activities for families with kids and surprise performers.  A pop-up exhibition at 198 Randolph Street will feature artists from the The Parsons School of Design at the New School, the official sponsor of the weekend, along with local artists. The Museum of the City of New York will be projecting images of Bushwick from over 100 years ago and sharing a huge blown-up photo of Bushwick in 1909. All money from the artwork sold at the exhibit — that opens to the public at 7pm on Friday, June 3, and can be viewed on Saturday and Sunday from 10am-5pm — will go directly to the artists. Local artists will also be exhibiting their work independently. Performers opening the weekend include: The BBoy Rebels (NYC Original Subway Dancers), DJ Mister Cee, Loaf Muzik, Monsters of Brooklyn, Thorough, Thirsting Howl lll, Styles P and Jim Jones. And on Saturday — in addition to JADAKISS — DJ Statik Selektah and friends, Lil Waah, Joell Ortiz, Dave EastChris Rivers, son of the legendary Big Pun, and The BBoy Rebels will perform. Keep posted to our website for updates.

oji-street-art-Bushwick-Collective-NYC

Who are some artists we can look forward to meeting?

Artists from everywhere will be painting. Among them are: D*Face, Case Maclaim, Sipros, Atomik, Don Rimx and Trans1. Local artists include: Giz, Tats Cru, CrashMeres, Topaz, Plasma Slug, Lola the Illustrator and Hops 1.

starfighter-street-art-Bushwick-Collective-NYC

That sounds great! What’s ahead for the Bushwick Collective?

We will continue to grow as an organization and evolve with time. We look forward to further collaborations with Mana Urban Arts.  We also look forward to establishing new partnerships.

Images

1. Giz, Ghost, Such, RIS Crew

2. Sipros

3. Case Maclaim

4. Oji

5. Starfighter

Photo credits: 1 & 3 City-as-School intern Sol Raxlen; 2, 4 & 5 Lois Stavsky; interview conducted and edited by Lois Stavsky with Sol Raxlen

Note: Hailed in a range of media from the Huffington Post to the New York Times, our Street Art NYC App is now available for Android devices here.

en-play-badge 2

{ 0 comments }

giz-ghost_edited-1

This past Friday, we visited Fillin Global’s inaugural showing of curated art at Castle Fitzjohns on the Lower East Side. Featuring a diverse range of creative artworks by over two dozen artists in different media, the exhibit exudes a wonderfully expressive energy. Among the artists whose works we saw are many who also bring their talents to our city’s streets. While there, we had the opportunity we had the opportunity to speak to Thomas Feinstein — of Fillin Global — who curated the exhibit with co-curator Jackie Collins.

This exhibit is amazing! There are so many different styles and techniques represented here, and everything seems to work together. Just what is Fillin Global?

FILLIN is an artist agency, representing innovative artists from across the globe.

such-graffiti-on-canvas

How did you get such a varied, talented group of artists together in one setting? 

Many are friends. Some I’ve known from my childhood growing up in Long Island. Let’s just say I was a bad kid!

ja-giz

How long did it take you to get this exhibit together?

I began working two months ago for a February 19 launch. But during the final week, I barely slept at all.

marc-evan-art

 What were some of the challenges that came your way in getting this all together?

The biggest challenge was working with such a wide range of styles and media and making it all flow.

Dain-artwork

How have folks responded to the exhibit?

They love it!

phetus-artwork-fillinglobal

 What’s ahead?

We are planning an event in a huge warehouse where artists will be able to paint directly on the walls. It will take place this summer.

That sounds great! Good luck and congratulations on this inaugural show.

Note: Today, Sunday, Feb 28, is the final day to check out the Fillin Global’s inaugural exhibit. The gallery — located at 98 Orchard Street — will remain open until 10pm.

Images:

1. Giz & Ghost, Untitled

2. Such, The Big ‘H’

3. JA & Giz, Tabs of the Rising Sun

4. Marc Evan, Limitless Undying Love

5. Dain, I Wasted Time on You

6. Phetus, Untitled

Photo credits: 1, 3 & 6 Tara Murray; 2 & 5 Dani Reyes Mozeson and 4 Lois Stavsky

More artworks and info about them can be seen here.

Note: Hailed in a range of media from the Huffington Post to the New York Times, our Street Art NYC App is now available for Android devices here.

en-play-badge 2

{ 0 comments }

Rimx-street-art-wynwood-miami

In collaboration with the Mana Urban Arts Project, the Bushwick Collective transformed Wynwood’s former RC Cola Factory into a Mecca of first-rate street art and graffiti. During Miami Art Week, celebrated artists from across the globe painted alongside local Miami and NYC-based artists. Here are a few more images from among the dozens of murals I saw last week while visiting Wynwood:

London-based James Cochran aka Jimmy C

"Jimmy C"

London-based Shok1

Shok1-street-art-wynwood-miami

NYC-based Giz RIS

giz-graffiti-wynwood-miami

NYC-based Lady Aiko

aiko-wynwood-street-art-miami

Dutch artist David Louf aka Mr June

Mr-June-street-art-wynwood

Miami-based Hoxxoh

Hoxxoh

West Coast-based Christina Angelina

christina-angelina-wynwood-street-art-miami

First image is a close-up from a huge mural by David Sepulveda aka Rimx

Photos by Lois Stavsky

{ 1 comment }

On view at the Judith Charles Gallery though tomorrow — Sunday — is a selection of new works, along with salvaged ones, by many of the artists who had participated in last year’s landmark 21st Precinct Exhibit. Here is a sampling:

Alice Mizrachi

Alice-Mizrachi-art-21st-precinct

Ghost and Giz, fragment salvaged from last year’s installation

giz-and-ghost-graffiti-fragment

Chris Soria and Misha Tyutyunik

Chris-Soria-and-Misha-Tyutyunik-art-collab

Pesu 

pesu-art-21st-precinct

Lorenzo Masnah. fragment

lorenzo-masnah-recycled-art-21st-precinct

Ben Angotti. close-up

Ben-Antotti-art-on-canvas

Bad Pedestrian

bad-pedestrian

N Carlos J

N-Carlos-J-21st-precinct-exhibit

Presented by Outlaw Arts, the exhibit remains on view 1-9pm today, Saturday, and tomorrow.

Photos of artworks by Lois Stavsky 

{ 0 comments }

noxer-kaput-giz-martinez-gallery

While visiting the Free Radicals graffiti exhibit at ALL CITY this past Friday, I had the opportunity to speak to noted Martinez Gallery director Hugo Martinez who — together with Dr. Juan Tapia — envisioned and helped realize this wonderful space that serves as a graffiti art gallery, arts center and pediatric clinic.

What an amazing venture this is! A pediatric clinic, a dynamic art gallery and lounge all sharing the same space. Whose concept was this?

It was Einstein’s. “After a certain high level of technical skill is achieved, science and art tend to coalesce in esthetics, plasticity and form,” he once stated. There is a natural synthesis between art and medicine, and a health clinic is an ideal setting to realize it.

Noxer

What made this extraordinary space possible?

2.5 million dollars and seven years.

Who were the main forces behind it?

I work with Dr. Juan Tapia, a pediatrician and former graffiti artist known as C.A.T. 87.  We were inspired to observe and measure evidence-based results of fusing two seemingly antithetical concepts.

"Navy8 and False"

How did you two come to collaborate?

I met Juan over 40 years ago when I was a student at City College and he was a Warlord for the neighborhood division of the Young Savage Nomads gang.  In 1972, we co-founded the United Graffiti Artists (UGA) as an alternative community to the established art world. Juan then went on to earn his GED and attend college and medical school. We have since collaborated on many community-based art and health projects. And in 2008, we established the ALL CITY Foundation.

Can you tell us something about the ALL CITY Foundation?

It is a community-based health and arts collaborative that has brought together a network of medical practitioners, artists and designers to create and run coordinated health and art programs for youth in New York City.

Navy8

Your current exhibit, Free Radicals, is a remarkable representation of various works in different media by a range of prolific artists.

Yes. All of the artists in this exhibit have established all-city reputations, most in NYC and a few in other large cities.

Why did you choose this particular space on the corner of 135th Street and Broadway? It is quite impressive.

It is close to City College, where UGA was first established. And the lay-out of the building, the former Claremont Theater – a 22,500-square-foot landmark that was the first theater to show photoplays — is perfectly designed for our purposes.

Soviet

from-the-outside-martinez

What’s ahead?

A range of programs, activities and revolving art exhibits.

Note: Free Radicals continues through March 31 at 3332 Broadway at 135th Street in Harlem. All artworks are for sale. You can follow the Martinez Gallery online at martinezgallery.com and on Instagram at instagram.com/martinezgallery. You can also visit the space with NY1 and check out this recent story in the New York Times.

Photos

1. Kaput, Noxer and Giz

2Noxer

3. False and Navy8

4. Navy8

5. Soviet, close-up

6. Various artists, as seen from the outside looking inside

Interview and photos by Lois Stavsky

{ 0 comments }