East Village

To the delight of us graffiti lovers, First Street Green Park has been showcasing artwork by a range of first rate, often legendary, graffiti writers and muralists. The image featured above was painted by Andre Trenier  and Zaone. What follows are several more murals that surfaced at last month’s Summer Classics Block Party hosted by DJNY Art:

Albertus Joseph and Jaylo YNN, tribute to the late Sean Price

Jeff Henriquez at work on tribute mural to the late Guru of Gang Starr

Wore IBM does Rakim

Graff masters T Kid and Doves at work

T Kid‘s completed piece

Completed Doves piece

And on Friday — September 8th — DJNY Art will be hosting “Welcome To The Lab,” a Pop Up event for Nike and Sneaker Lab at Van Der Plas Gallery, 156 Orchard Street on the LES.

Photos: 1, 2, 4, 6 & 7 Lois Stavsky; 3 & 5 courtesy Kate Storch

Note: Hailed in a range of media from WideWalls to the Huffington Post to the New York Times, our Street Art NYC App is now available for Android devices here.

en-play-badge 2

{ 0 comments }

PAUL-RICHARD-GENTLEMAN (1)

Opening this evening at 212 ARTS is DRIP, a solo exhibit by the iconic NYC-based artist Paul Richard. An outstanding representational painter, Paul Richard is best known to us street art aficionados for his drip paintings that surface on NYC sidewalks. While visiting the exhibit yesterday, I had the opportunity to speak to 212 ARTS gallerist, Marc Leader.

This is such an elegantly handsome show! What spurred you to feature an exhibit of Paul Richard‘s works?

Paul has been an iconic figure in NYC culture for over 20 years. Although low-key, he is also subtly prolific. And this is his first NYC exhibit in five years.

paul-richard-art-on-door

How did you decide which artworks to include in the exhibit?

About one year ago, Paul and I began discussing the concept of an exhibit featuring his work at 212 ARTS. Then Paul ran with it. He created a few dozen new works, and together we decided which ones to feature.

paul-richard-urban-tank

How many are included in DRIP?

There are two dozen works of varying sizes.

paul-richard-commuter

It is always a thrill to glance down to the pavement and come upon one of Paul Richard‘s iconic faces!

Yes! Even before he first moved to New York in 1997, Paul Richard recognized that people constantly scan the ground in front of them — making it the perfect place to find an audience.

Paul-Richard-pavement-art

It’s great to see your gallery continue to bring a diverse range of first-rate artists — who remain active on our streets — to its East Village home. To what do you attribute its success?

It’s the passion we bring to our projects.

Paul-richard-opening-212-arts

Photos of artworks and interview by Lois Stavsky

{ 0 comments }

Hydeon-and-sticky-monger-public-art-centrefuge-NYC

The once-dreary trailer on East First Street — where the Lower East Side meets the East Village — has again been redesigned under the curatorial direction of Jonathan Neville, Joshua Geyer and Matthew Denton Burrows. And we love it! Pictured above are Hydeon and Sticky Monger at work. What follows are several more images — some of the artists captured in progress and others of the completed pieces.

Ian Ferguson aka Hydeon and Stickymonger, as seen this past week

Hydeon-and-sticky-monger-public-aart-nyc

Jenna Krypell

Jena-Krypell-painting-nyc

John Exit aka scrambledeggsit at work

John-exit-live-painting-NYC

John Exit aka scrambledeggsit, as seen this past week

John-Exit-public art-East-Village-NYC

Grimace NYC at work

Grimace-NYC-public-art-centrefuge

Grimace NYC, as seen in the bright sun this past week

IMG_8227

Kat Lam aka Lamkat

lamkat-public-art-east-village-nyc

Photo credits: 1, 4, 6 & 8 Tara Murray;  2, 3, 5 & 7 Lois Stavsky

Note: Hailed in a range of media from Wide Walls to the Huffington Post to the New York Times, our Street Art NYC App is now available for Android devices here.

en-play-badge 2

{ 0 comments }

T-Kid-graffiti-nyc

Last Tuesday, First Street Green Park — on the corner of Houston Street and 2nd Avenue — was home to a buoyant celebration of International Hip-Hop Day. Hosted by PeepThis and organized by Anthony Bowman and Kate Storch, the event featured legendary graffiti artists, along with hip-hop and DJing pioneers. The mural pictured above was painted by T-Kid. Here are several more images we captured:

Jerms

Jerms-graffiti-first-green-park-nyc

Doves

doves-graffiti-nyc

Lady K Fever at work

lady-k-fever-graffiti-nyc

Andres Correa at work, to the left of Kool Kito

andres-correa-street-art-first-green-park-nyc

Marcelo Ment — in from Brazil

marcelo-ment-first-green-park-nyc

La Femme Cheri, Ree and Theresa Kim aka Resa Piece

Cheri-ree-and resa-piece-graffiti-art-nyc

The crew

Hip-Hop-International-Day-artists

Other featured New York graffiti and street art legends included: Will Power, Flint 707, Nic 707, Keo, Omni and Frank Wore Croce. The hip-hop music — featuring DJ Grand Wizard Theodore and DJJS1 — was broadcast live on Damatrix Studios.

Photo credits: 1-4 & 7  Lois Stavsky 5 & 6 Tara Murray & 8 Karin du Maire

Note: Hailed in a range of media from Wide Walls to the Huffington Post to the New York Times, our Street Art NYC App is now available for Android devices here.

en-play-badge 2

{ 0 comments }

kwue-molly-col-ski-and-2esae-jpg

Under the direction of Centre-fuge Public Art Project co-founder Jonathan Neville, the once drab trailer on the south side of East First Street is continually reinvented. Here are some images from its current transformation:

Staten Island-based Kwue Molly with the Ology Collective — Col, 2ease & Ski

kwue-molly-and-ology-collective-nyc

Brooklyn-based Julia Cocuzza with J Mike Kuhn on her left

julia-cocuzza-public-art-nyc

J Mike Kuhn

j-mike-kuhn-public-art-nyc

Ogie 

ogie-public-art-nyc

Damien Miksza

damien-miksza-public-art-nyc

Check here for information on how you can submit a proposal to paint on the East 1st Street Trailer.

Photos by Lois Stavsky

{ 0 comments }

santhori-wuth-youth-mural-art-first-green

Back in 2008, First Street Green converted a derelict building lot at 33 E. 1st Street in Manhattan’s Lower East Side into an open art space. In collaboration with NYC Parks and Partnership For Parks, it has successfully incorporated the lot into First Park.

These days, First Street Green provides a wide range of cultural activities and programs in First Park by engaging with artists, architects, cultural groups and community members. It has also become a favorite destination for us street art aficionados, as it has evolved into an intriguing outdoor gallery featuring some of our favorite artists and introducing us to others. Pictured above is a segment of a collaborative mural created during #WeSpyNY, a community workshop conducted by Swiss pop artist Santhori. Here is a small sampling of other works that were seen earlier this month:

Bosnian artist Vedran Misic

vedran-misic-mural-art-nyc

Murrz

murrz-street-art-nycjpg

Bronx-born, Copenhagen-based artist, musician and activist Peter Missing, close-up of huge mural

peter-missing-mural-art-nyc

Melbourne-based artist Stuart Ringholt

stuart-ringholt-sculpture-first-street-green-park

 Photo credits:1-4 Lois Stavsky & 5 Tara Murray

{ 0 comments }

Flip-graffiti-pioneer-at-Centre-fuge

A pioneer of the graffiti movement, Charles Henry aka FLIP One was immortalized in Flint Gennari’s classic photo of him tagging a Coney Island-bound train over 40 years ago. And this past spring the now-iconic photo made its way onto a stencil fashioned by Balu for the Centre-fuge Public Art Project. I met up with the artist — now an LA-based Emmy award-winning cinematographer — while he was visiting NYC last month.

When and where did you first get up?

It was back in 1974 in Propsect Park, Brooklyn. I was 15.

What inspired you to?

Flint’s writings were everywhere in my neighborhood. He was my main inspiration. He also got me into photography. Other writers such as Spin, Coco 144 and Mico also influenced me. And I loved the adrenalin rush hitting the trains late nights and the little bit of fame watching my name go by.

flint-gennari-photo-of-Flint

What was your preferred surface back then?

The Franklin Avenue shuttle.

How did your family feel about what you were doing?

They were not happy. My dad used to work for the MTA.

Do you have any specific graffiti memory that stands out?

I saw once — and only once — an LL Cool J top to bottom while I was riding the train to school. I will never forget that!

Flip-tags-graffiti

Did you work alone or did you collaborate with others?

I painted with the Ex Vandals and the Soul Stoned Brothers (SSB).  But I generally preferred working alone, because I didn’t want to draw attention to myself.

What was the riskiest thing you ever did?

Entering the 7 yard with Flint, Dime 139 and Asp across from Shea Stadium during a playoff game in the World Series. Luckily, the cops — who were supposed to be watching the yard — were too busy watching the game on their little black and white TV to pay attention to us! And so we managed to get in and out and do our thing in broad daylight without anyone noticing.

Has your work ever been exhibited?

Yes, my work has appeared in Flint Gennari’s photos in several galleries and museums. My small trains have been exhibited in galleries in LA.

flint-and-balu

How do you feel about the movement of graffiti into galleries?

I think it’s great! It suggests that what we did has meaning.

What about the increasing engagement of the corporate world in the graffiti subculture?

I used to hate it, but it doesn’t bother me any more. Writers risked getting arrested, maimed — and more — for what they did. They should be paid!

Have you any thoughts about the graffiti/street art divide?

It’s not an issue. My favorite artists tend to blur the line between both: They include: El MacRetna, ObeyMan One and Revok.

Flint-Flip-AimSSB

How do you feel about the role of the Internet in it all?

I love it! I get to see the work of people I used to war against!

Any thoughts as to why the Europeans are more open to graffiti than most Americans are?

I haven’t really thought about it, but maybe it’s because they place a higher value on self-expression.

And there’s probably no art form more expressive art than graffiti!

Photo credits: 1, 3-5 Lois Stavsky; 2 Flint Gennari; interview conducted and edited by Lois Stavsky

Photo 3  features Balu to the right of Flip One and the last photo features Flint to the left and George Colon aka AIM SSB to the right of Flip One

Note: Jan Arnold, the artist’s wife, is in the process of completing a documentary about Flip One’s life. Be sure to check its Facebook page here for some great photos and clips!

Hailed in a range of media from the Huffington Post to the New York Times, our Street Art NYC App is now available for Android devices here.

en-play-badge 2

{ 0 comments }

flint-tags-centrefuge

Among the intriguing images that recently surfaced on the once-abandoned East Village trailer, curated by the Centre-fuge Public Art Project, is Balu‘s rendition of Ex-Vandal Flint Gennari’s photo of old school writer, Flip One. This past Sunday several legendary writers graced the trailer with their tags.

Balu captured at work earlier this month

Balu-stencil-art-action-nyc

Nic 707 — to the right of Al Diaz aka Bomb 1 tag

Nic-at-Centrefige-NYC

Rocky 184

rocky184-centre-fuge

Kool Kito

kool-kito

Snake 1

snake-paints-canvas

Coco 144

coco-tags-East-Village

Nic 707, Snake 1, Coco 144, Rocky 184 and Flint

Old-School--graffiti-writers

All photos by bytegirl

{ 1 comment }

free-humanity-212-arts

From the plaintive to the playful, the artworks on exhibit in From the West Coast at 212 Arts intrigue. While visiting last week, I had the opportunity to speak to gallerist Mark Leader, who curated the exhibit:

Many of these artists are new to me. Just what is going on here?

This exhibit is a survey of various West Coast artists — largely from LA, San Francisco, Santa Monica and New Mexico.

Eddie-Colla-acrylic-spray-paint

There is certainly quite a diverse range of styles represented here. What spurred you to bring these artists to NYC?

It was an opportunity to introduce a brand new visual language to others. My sense is that the West Coast sensibility is quite different from ours.

Mike-Giant-212-arts

How did you first discover these artists?

Largely through Instagram. And I had worked with some of them before.

sket-one-212-arts

Were there any particular challenges in making this happen?

Just the logistics of transporting the art from the West Coast to here in the East Village.

Max-Neutra-acrylic-212Arts-NYC

How have folks responded to the exhibit?

They’ve responded positively with lots of curiosity!

bisco-Smith-212-arts

How can folks see the exhibit?

As there has been a pique of interest in the exhibit since these works were initially showcased, there will be a second launch this Thursday, April 21, beginning at 6 pm.

212-arts-invite

And what’s next for 212 Arts?

Opening May 6 is Round Trip, Emilio Ramos‘s first solo exhibit.

Interview and photos 1, 2, 4-6 Lois Stavsky

Images:

1. Free Humanity

2. Eddie Colla

3. Mike Giant

4. Sket One — on platform designed by Tracy 168, with Marc Leader on right

5. Max Neutra

6. Bisco Smith

Note: Hailed in a range of media from the Huffington Post to the New York Times, our Street Art NYC App is now available here for Android devices.

en-play-badge 2

{ 0 comments }

T-kid-on-canvas-at-212-arts-NYC

Continuing through March 8 at 212 Arts in the East Village is Graffiti Legends, an exuberant exhibit of artworks by legendary Bronx artists: Bio, BG 183, Ces, Crash, Nicer, Skeme and T-Kid.  What follows is a sampling:

Another by T-Kid

T-kid-graffiti-on-canvas

Skeme

skeme-graffiti-212-arts

 BioTats Cru, close-up

bio-tats-cru-graffiti-canvas-212-arts

Ces

ces-graffiti-canvas

Crash

john-crash-matos-art-on-canvas

And a range of tags  — many, also, legendary — that surfaced on canvas opening night

t

Curated by 212 Arts director Marc Leader, Graffiti Legends remains on exhibit through next Tuesday at 240 East 4th Street.  Hours are:  Tuesday through Saturday 2:00 pm – 8:00 pm, and Sunday 2:00 pm – 7:00 pm.

Photo credits: 1 Tara Murray; 2 Houda Lazrak; 3 Lois Stavsky and 4-7 Dani Reyes Mozeson

Note: Hailed in a range of media from the Huffington Post to the New York Times, our Street Art NYC App is now available for Android devices here.

en-play-badge 2

{ 0 comments }