design

The following guest post is by Houda Lazrak, a graduate student in Museum Studies at New York University.

MH Cover

Presenting a distinctive global perspective on art, music, fashion and culture, Modern Hieroglyphics — readying now for the release of its second issue — premiered this past summer. Co-founded by adventurous designer Jack McKain and West Coast-based artist Chor Boogie, the 156-page publication features fascinating interviews with ten talented artists, along with dozens of photos.

Tapping into graffiti history, the term Modern Hieroglyphics was first coined by San Diego-based Blame One. The term was then popularized by Chor Boogie to define his personal style. Finally, it was re-adapted to serve as the title and theme for this magazine’s spirit – a belief in the inherent power of visual communication through pictures and pictographs.

Meres-One-5-Pointz-Modern-Hieroglyphics

The interviews, conducted by McKain, are first rate. Meres One, for example, recounts his experience as curator of Long Island City’s 5 Pointz, along with his tenuous fight against gentrification and the whitewash of the iconic legal graffiti space. In another interview, Noah Scalin describes his Skull-A-Day project. To challenge his creative capacity and test his commitment abilities, the artist embarked on a one-year venture to fashion a skull image from different materials every day. Scalin describes how he garnered an online following and transformed what was a personal project into a public one – a creative commitment that, he confesses, became addictive. 

All of the interviews are accompanied with strikingly beautiful images and end with links to relevant social media.  To promote the role of photographers in the creation process of Modern Hieroglyphics, the publication also includes clear photo credits and devotes the final page to photographers’ contact information.

Shaka-Modern-Hieroglyphics

Certain to appeal to us street art and graffiti aficionados, Modern Hieroglyphics is a widely creative platform that exposes the talents of international artists through captivating imagery and engaging text. 

Note: In addition to its website and Facebook page, you can also follow Modern Hieroglyphics on Instagram as it readies for the release of its second issue.

Photos: 1. cover and 3. Shaka (close-up) courtesy of the publisher; 2. Meres One by Dani Reyes Mozeson as featured in Modern Hieroglyphics

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Armed with spray paint, paintbrushes, markers, pencils and assorted implements, a diverse group of artists have transformed the ground level of the Marina at Pier 57 into a mesmerizing medley of styles, shapes, colors and concepts. Here’s a sampling of what we recently captured on the “magic carpet” under 36 suspended shipping containers:

Iranian stencil artist IcySinned painting, top left

Icy and Sinned

Icy’s brother and partner Sot 

Sot

Daniel Patrick at work with words

Daniel Patrick

Queens-based artist Sinned, close-up

Sinned

Painter Bruce Wall at work on piece in collaboration with Josh Miller

Bruce Wall

Bruce Wall

 Garrison Buxton of Ad Hoc Art

Garrison- Buxton-art-Pier-57

NYC-based RJ Raizk

RJ Raizk

RJ Raizk

Brooklyn-based Subtexture

Subtexture

Not pictured are works by Depoe, Rrobots and In Pursuit of Magic.

Commissioned by YoungWoo & Associates, the completed artworks can be seen at the Marina at Pier 57 at West 15th Street within Hudson River Park through July.

Photos by Dani Mozeson, Tara Murray and Lois Stavsky

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Dylan Egon

Charmed by Dylan Egon’s paste-ups that surface on the streets of Manhattan’s and Brooklyn’s trendier neighborhoods, we loved viewing this Jersey City-based designer’s works currently on exhibit and for sale at reGeneration. Here is a sampling:

Dylan Egon

Dylan Egon

Table stools

Dylan Egon

She’s Found Religion (mod Victorian vanity totem)

Dylan Egon

And the iconic Petey

Dylan Egon

Presented in cooperation with the Jonathan LeVine Gallery and ABC Home Store, Dylan Egon’s splendid pieces can be seen at 38 Renwick Street, between Prince and Canal.

Photos by Lois Stavsky

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