Basquiat

If you haven’t yet had your portrait drawn with one line in under one minute by the wonderfully passionate, nomadic Brooklyn-based 0H10 M1ke, tomorrow is your chance. From 6 – 10pm, Mike promises to do that and lots more at 198 Allen Street. Last week, we met up and caught up a bit.

When we last spoke in 2014, you said that your goal was to create 100,000 one-line matchbox portraits? Mine was 11,206! How close are you to your goal?

My most recent was #13,021! I’ve done quite a few at 17 Frost, at 198 Allen, on the trains, on the streets — anywhere I can!

How do you approach folks? And how do they respond?

I simply say, “Give me a New York moment; I’ll draw your portrait in one line on a matchbox in one minute.” They generally respond with skepticism. But once they see the portrait I’ve created, they like it.

In addition to your ongoing matchbox project, what other projects have engaged you as of late?

I’ve been preparing for my upcoming solo show and performance If Basquiat and Keith Haring had a baby…reimagining the works of Basquiat and Haring in one-line drawings. I’ve, also, been working on creating sculptures inspired by Warhol; instead of using Brillo boxes, I use Nike boxes. And I’ve been staging wrestling as dance, which will be projected –along with large portraits — onto a huge screen outside 198 Allen.

What inspires you to keep creating?

I’m compulsive. I have to. And people, the street art community in particular, have been welcoming and supportive.

Are there any particular artists out there who continue to influenc your aesthetic?

Obviously Haring and Basquiat. But other main influences include UFO and Neckface.

Anything else new — in terms of your art-making?

I’ve been getting my original drawings into hand-made books. I recently constructed a 3o-pocket rotating magazine rack, and I’ve filled it with all hand-made original artbooks and magazines. I also create on a larger variety of surfaces.

What’s ahead?

Murals, prints and reproducibles.

Good luck with it all!

Note: You can keep up with 0H10 M1ke here — now that he’s posting on Instagram!

Interview conducted and edited by Lois Stavsky; all images courtesy of the artist

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Since September 26, 57 Great Jones Street — the former home and studio of Al Diaz collaborator, Jean-Michel Basquiat — has been the site of Same Old Gallery, a multimedia exhibit showcasing Al Diaz ‘s masterful wordplay and inventive aesthetic. Curated by Adrian Wilson and Brian Shevlin, it features a diverse array of new work by Al Diaz, in addition to historic photos and memorabilia from back in the day when the SAMO© tag that he and Jean-Michel Basquiat had conceived was the talk of the town. Several photos I captured while visiting the space follow:

Mixed media with stencil art

Another contemplation on the brevity of it all

Mixed media musings

With a message for these times

The 1978 Village Voice article that reveals SAMO©’s identity

And this weekend marks the launch of Al Diaz‘s book with a signing and talk

Photos 1-6: Lois Stavsky

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On exhibit through June 13 at Acquavella Galleries on Manhattan’s Upper East Side is an exhibit of 22 works on paper and two paintings by Jean-Michel Basquiat. From the collection of Herbert and Lenore Schorr, who recognized and valued Basquiat’s talents early on, many of these have never been exhibited before. Here’s a sampling:

Untitled, acrylic marker, paper collage, oil paintstick, and crayon on paper, 1981

Basquiat

Untitled, oil painstick on paper, 1981

Basquiat

Portrait of Herb and Lenore, acrylic on paper, 1983

Basquiat

Untitled, acrylic and oil paintstick on paper, 1982

Basquiat

Untitled, graphite and colored pencil on paper, 1985

Basquiat

Jean-Michel Basquiat Drawing: Work from the Schorr Family Collection was curated by Fred Hoffman who co-curated Basquiat’s 2005 retrospective at the Brooklyn Museum. None of the artworks in the exhibit are for sale. “It is strictly educational,” Lenore Schorr is quoted as saying earlier this year in the New York Times.  Acquavella Galleries is located at 18 East 79th Street.

Photos of images by Dani Reyes Mozeson;  all images The Schorr Family Colletion © The Estate of Jean-Michel Basquiat / ADAGP, Paris / ARS, New York 2014. 

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