17 Frost

Since its launch in 2008, 17 Frost has emerged as one of NYC’s most intriguing and innovative creative spaces. Warm and welcoming, it is intent in its mission to“provide the best platform possible to showcase the talents of artists worldwide.” And during this past year of extensive renovations, it has continued to host its weekly Family Night, where artists meet to fashion individually and collaboratively a wondrous range of sticker art.

Pictured above are: Love from NYCJason Mamarella aka dwkrsna, Alex Itin, Sara Erenthal and 17 Frost Creative Director Javier Hernandez-Miyares. What follows are several more images captured at 17 Frost’s informal Family Night.

Jason Mamarella aka dwkrsna and Alex Itin

Sara Erenthal and Javier Hernandez-Miyares

Javier Hernandez-Miyares

Love from NYC and  Alex Itinwith Lenny Collado aka BK Lenny checking it all out

Alex Itin and Javier Hernandez-Miyares collaborate

Poster BoyJavier Hernandez-Miyares, Dummy Tree, Arek Jungle, Net, Ninja Status & more

A random finding in the huge space — soon to reopen

Note: 17 Frost is planning a grand reopening exhibition  — curated by Ellis Gallagher — in late February. Information will follow.

Photo credits: 1-5 Lois Stavsky; 6 & 7 Javier Hernandez-Miyares and 8 Lenny Collado 



Splendidly curated by Ellis Gallagher, Collaborations features selected works by Crash fashioned collaboratively with both local and global artists. The mural pictured above was painted by Crash in collaboration with Stash. What follows is a sampling of works — representing the diverse range of collaborative styles and sensibilities — inside the gallery at 17 Frost Street in Williamsburg:

Crash with Nick Walker and Bio, Tats Cru


Crash with KAWS


 Crash with Remi Rough


Crash with Bio


Crash with BR163


 Crash with James Choules aka She One


Collaborations remains on exhibit through June 26 at 17 Frost by appointment only.

Photo credits: 1 & 7 Lois Stavsky; 2, 4, 5 & 6 City-as-School intern Sol Raxlen and 3 Tara Murray

Note: Hailed in a range of media from the Huffington Post to the New York Times, our Street Art NYC App is now available for Android devices here.

en-play-badge 2



SOLD Magazine launched this past Thursday evening with an exhibit — co-curated with Ellis Gallagher — and party at 17 Frost. When I stopped by early in the evening, I had the opportunity to speak to John Paul O’Grodnick, who — along with Greg Frederick and BD White — made it all happen.

 Just what is SOLD Magazine?

SOLD Magazine is a free magazine by artists for artists and art lovers. Among its features are: artists interviewing each other, studio visits, artist and photographer profiles, a travel section and much more.

What motivated you thee to launch it?

A sense that artists need a new platform for exposure. Our mission is to provide that platform.


 When did you guys first begin working on SOLD Magazine? And how did you fund it?

We began working on it at the beginning of October, and we funded it via a Kickstarter campaign.

It’s great that your campaign was so successful! What has been your greatest challenge in seeing this through?

Rounding up the artists whom we wanted to participate in our venture.


 Was it an open call? How did you decide which artists to include?

No! It was artists we’ve known and worked with in the past. Some of them suggested others.

How often do you expect to publish SOLD Magazine?

Once every three months. It is intended as a quarterly.


How will folks be able to get hold of it?

We plan to make it available in galleries and museums throughout the city, as well as in local businesses here in Williamsburg.

I notice that this premier issue focuses on female artists, with your first cover featuring Gilf and Elle. What can we expect in future issues?

Every issue will have a theme. Our next one will focus on collaborations.

Ramiro-Davato-art -at-17-Frost

 That sounds great! Congratulations!

Note: The above images of are of works that were on exhibit and for sale at Thursday evening’s SOLD Magazine‘s launch:

1. Jily Ballistic and John Paul O’Grodnick aka JPO

2. Chris RWK

3. Raquel Echanique

4. Elle

5. Ramiro Davaro

Interview by Lois Stavsky and photos by Tara Murray



On exhibit through tomorrow — Saturday — evening at 17 Frost is Royce Bannon‘s Living the After Life.  Fashioned on a range of found surfaces — some collaboratively — all of the images intrigue. Curious as to what is going on, I posed some questions to Royce.

What does this all mean? What is going on here?

These works represent my ideal vision of the afterlife — doing the things that I enjoy doing — when I am living as a ghost. It is a celebration of life after death.



 What, do you suppose, was the impetus behind this theme? Why the focus on life after death?

My mother recently died. For quite awhile I’d been preparing myself for her death and thinking about the afterlife. Death is not the end.


How have folks responded to this body of work? 

The response has been positive. There’s been considerable interest in the works.


How can folks to be sure see the exhibit before it closes?

Everyone is invited to the closing party to be held tomorrow evening — Saturday, March 21 — at 17 Frost Street from 7-11pm.


Note: Tomorrow evening’s closing party will feature a new collabo with EKG and a live drum machine performance by Jefferson Wells.


1. Fishing buddies, Collab with Keren Hasson, Acrylic on wood

2. The swing is always broken in limbo, Collab with KA, Acrylic and spray paint on metal.

3. Remember that day, pt 2, Acrylic on wood

4. Only positive thoughts, Acrylic on metal

5. So far, Collab with Observer Obscura, Mixed media on wood

Photos of artworks by Lois Stavsky


A specialized new online gallery certain to appeal to us street art aficionados, Cluster Wall launches tomorrow evening with an exhibit and party at 17 Frost in Williamsburg, Brooklyn. We recently had the opportunity to speak to Cluster Wall’s founder, Evan Tobias. 


What is Cluster Wall? Why that name?

It is a term I respond to! As an art-lover and collector, I tend to cluster art of all colors and styles in our Brooklyn apartment. The results are vibrant, bold and kinetic, like New York City, itself!

What is your mission in launching Cluster Wall?

My mission is to provide art lovers with the opportunity to purchase first-rate, hand-embellished affordable art. There will not be any ink jet prints. All of the artworks will be signed and numbered, and editions will be limited. Prints will be released in a series of 100 or fewer. And, in addition, a small number of original works will also be made available.

"Evan Tobias"

What work experiences do you bring with you to your current position?

I was the founder and editor of Block Magazine, and founder of the Full Circle Bar in Williamsburg.

Most of the artists — whose works you will be exhibiting and selling — are active on the streets. Why the focus on street art?

I’m a big fan of street art. I’ve been living in Williamsburg since 2001, and I’ve seen how street art has enhanced my neighborhood. It has made it a better place to live. But Cluster Wall is not limited to street artists. I will be releasing artworks by other contemporary urban artists, as well.


How did you decide which artists to work with?

I started off by contacting artists I know, and then I was connected to some others. I was specifically looking for artwork that I love that would also work well as prints.

Can you tell us something about this weekend’s exhibit? What can we expect to see?

We will be featuring prints and original artworks by Chris RWK, Joe Iurato, Rubin, ASVP, Elle, The Drif, London Kaye, Solus, Opie and ORYX, along with collaborative works by John Paul O’Grodnick and Jilly Ballistic, who will also be painting live.


What is Cluster Wall bringing to the art scene?

It provides art lovers with the opportunity to collect outstanding, innovative artwork at modest prices.

That all sounds great! Good luck!


Note: The launch begins at 7pm tomorrow — Saturday — at 17 Frost Street and will feature, along with dozens of artworks, music by DJ Nigel Rubirosa and refreshments provided by Lion Beer and Sea Grape Wines.

Interview conducted by City-as-School intern Zachariah Messaoud.


1. Chris RWK  

2. Cluster Wall founder Evan Tobias, seated in front of artwork by London Kaye 

3. The Drif

4. John Paul O’Grodnick and Jilly Ballistic

5.  Joe Iurato

All photos courtesy Cluster Wall, except for pic of Evan by Lois Stavsky


"Outdoor Gallery NYC"

Currently on view at 17 Frost is an exhibit of artwork by artists featured in Yoav Litvin’s remarkable book, Outdoor Gallery NYC. While visiting the exhibit on Thursday afternoon, we had the opportunity to speak to Yoav: 

This exhibit is in many ways a reflection of your book. It is wonderfully eclectic.

Yes, like the book Outdoor Gallery NYC, it celebrates the diversity of the incredible range of street art that surfaces in NYC’s public spaces.

"Enzo and Nio"

How did you connect with all of these artists – whose works are featured in your book and in this Outdoor Gallery NYC exhibit?

I initially met most of them through encountering their works on our streets. I further connected with them via Facebook or Instagram.


Can you tell us something about the process from the time you had your resources – your photos and interviews — to the actual production of the book?

Working with the designer, Steve Mosier, I created a template for a book. I then presented my concept to about 30 publishers. In late summer, I signed a contract with Gingko Press, my first choice.  The first copies of the book became available last week.

Billy Mode

The book looks wonderful, and your book launch party was quite remarkable. We’ve heard that folks waited on line for hours to get in.

Yes, that was quite humbling. And I feel grateful to everyone.

"Alice Mizrachi"

To what do you attribute the incredible success of the book launch?

My sense is that folks appreciate my particular approach. I have deep respect for all of the artists who share their works with us in public spaces. I admire their visions and their skills. I particularly love the way they challenge conventions.

"Chris Stain"

You are a scientist, as well as a photographer and street art documentarian. Has your background as a scientist affected the way you approach street art?

I suppose it has. It is essential that my research and findings remain “clean” and unbiased. I am interested in presenting something that is important not only on a local level, but on a global one, as well.


In what ways has this project impacted you?

I feel that I’ve developed a distinct personal style and approach to documenting street art.

"Icy and Sot"

If you had the opportunity to spend time in another city and work on a similar “Outdoor Gallery” project, which city would you choose to visit?

I’d probably choose São Paulo, Brazil.


The exhibit, curated by Yoav Litvin with Royce Bannon, continues through March 8 at 17 Frost Street in Williamsburg, Brooklyn. Yoav can be contacted at yoavlitvin@gmail.com; for updates, visit the book’s Facebook page.

Interview with Yoav Litvin conducted at 17 Frost by City-as-School intern Anna Loucka with Lois Stavsky; photos of artworks by Lois Stavsky. 1. Exterior of 17 Frost painted by Bishop203, elsol25 and Royce Bannon; 2 .Enzo & Nio, Retro Bomba; 3. Cern, Jardim Electrico; 4. Billy Mode, Love; 5. Alice Mizrachi, Queen, close-up; 6. Chris Stain, Up in the Bronx; 7. Bishop203, Jesus Christ Superstar;  8. Icy and Sot, Race and 9. ÑEWMERICA, small segment of collaborative mural 


On view this evening from 7-11pm at 17 Frost in Williamsburg, Brooklyn is October Surprise.  Curated by Jason Mamarella, aka d.w. krsna, it features works by some of our favorite artists who are active both on the streets and in their studios. Here’s a brief sampling:

Billi Kid

Billi kid

Abe Lincoln, Jr.

Abe Lincoln Jr.



Jason Mamarella, aka d.w. krsna, close-up (look carefully!)

Jason Mamarella



And here’s a close-up from WC Bevan — who works with ink he creates on paper recycled from abandoned spaces


Photos of artworks by Lois Stavsky


Jason Mamarella

For years, wheatpastes featuring Jason Mamarella’s iconic Dint Wooer Krsna, along with its many variations, were part of NYC’s visual landscape.  Although stickers featuring the eccentric, but lovable, character continue to surface throughout the boroughs, Dint Wooer Krsna, as we’ve come to know him, has largely disappeared. While checking out Jason Mamarella’s current exhibit – ending Saturday evening – at 17 Frost, we had the opportunity to ask him a few questions.

Jason Mamarella

When was Dint Wooer Krsna born?

At about the same time MySpace was born. When I joined, I did not want to reveal my identity. And so I created Dint Wooer Krsna.

So he’s had quite a long run. What happened? It seems that his presence in the streets has certainly diminished.

Definitely. It’s been awhile since I’ve hit the streets with anything other than stickers. I’m older and ready to move on to other things. Besides, the streets no longer call out to me the way they used to. They were far more interesting when I first began hitting them.

What about the artists getting up here in NYC these days? Do any interest you?

Not all that many. I like what Bäst is doing.  Other favorites include: Ana Peru, Jos l and Matt Siren.

Any thoughts about the move of street art into galleries?

I have no problem with it. It’s a different experience. What I show in galleries is almost always distinct from what I share on the streets.


What do you see as the role of the artist in society?

It is to present new ideas that aren’t widely accepted.

What’s ahead?

More painting. Collaborations with Street Grapes. Toys. Animation.

Sounds good!

KRSNA and Ana Peru

The final viewing of the organization of celestial coincidences by Jason Mamarella is Saturday, March 30, 2013, from 7 to 10 pm with special guests: Dint Wooer Krsna, Street Grapes & Jos-L. Peru Ana Ana Peru will be screening movies in the theater at 17 Frost Street Gallery, Williamsburg, Brooklyn. L train to Lorimer. A small number of limited edition books, featuring  a wide array of Jason Mamarella’s images, are still available. 

Photos by Lois Stavsky