Street Artists

banksy urban art in a material world edited 1 Ulrich Blanché on <em>Banksy: Urban Art in a Material World</em>

Penned by Ulrich Blanché, Banksy: Urban Art in a Material World focuses primarily on Banksy’s relationship with consumer culture.  With its thoroughly-researched appendix documenting everything from Banksy record album covers to his exhibition catalogs, it is the first comprehensive academic study of Banksy’s art.  An interview with the author follows:

Your book, Banksy: Urban Art in a Material World, began as a dissertational thesis.  Why did you choose to focus your studies on Banksy? What is it specifically about him that so intrigued you?

I was first introduced to street art and stencils in 2006 on a trip to Melbourne, Australia. And while visiting a museum bookshop there, I discovered Banksy’s book Wall and Piece. I was instantly fascinated and found myself going through it page by page. I liked the way each of his pieces has a distinct message or lesson that is transmitted in a humorous way.  I knew then that I would like to research and write about his work.

Banksy stencil art  Ulrich Blanché on <em>Banksy: Urban Art in a Material World</em>

You draw parallels between Banksy and the contemporary British artist Damien Hirst. You discuss their collaborations, as well. Can you tell us something about that?  What are some of the essential similarities between the two? What did each have to gain by collaborating?

It might still shock some people that Hirst, the personification of capitalism, and Banksy, the art guerilla, collaborated. They knew each other since about 2000, and Hirst supported Banksy early on. It was kind of like Warhol and Basquiat.  The established artist gains coolness and the newer artist gains credibility.  The two artists admired each other’s works – and both Banksy and Hirst shared a morbid and humorous sensibility. 

Among Banksy’s subjects are both capitalism and religion – often merged in a particular image.  Do any particular images stand out to you? And why do they?

Banksy does not really focus on religion except in relation to consumption. Shopping/ Money is the god of today. No particular work stands out for me. Some are weaker; some are better.

Banksy in NYC Ulrich Blanché on <em>Banksy: Urban Art in a Material World</em>

To what do you attribute Banksy’s extraordinary commercial success?

I suspect that Banksy actually earns much less than people think he does. His income comes from the sale of prints, books, DVDs… The people who bought a Banksy for 50 quid 15 years ago or received a Banksy as a present have profited  tremendously.

As Banksy rails against consumerism, he — himself — is a master at manipulating consumers.  Why might we have become such a society of consumers? Any thoughts?

We are easily manipulated, even when we know we are being manipulated.

Banksy stencil art creative commons Ulrich Blanché on <em>Banksy: Urban Art in a Material World</em>

How essential are the streets to Banksy’s success?

The street is his canvas – it is the means he uses to communicate. To remove the street from Banksy’s work is like removing a figure from a Rembrandt. If you manage to keep the context with photos, videos, background info, the work may survive indoors – once it’s no longer on the street. In Banksy’s words: “’I don’t know if street art ever really works indoors. If you domesticate an animal, it goes from being wild and free to sterile, fat and sleepy. So maybe the art should stay outside. Then again, some old people get a lot of comfort from having a pet around the house.”

Where is it all going? Will Banksy’s popularity and commercial success continue to rise? Will Banksy continue to use the streets as a canvas? Or will he become less dependent on them? What are your thoughts?

Street Art is over.  Most works on the street today are authorized murals or pieces in areas where the artist wants to be seen and photographed by the “right” people — whoever that might be.  Street art has become urban art for Instagram. Banksy will last. He will put a few works on the street every year and pull off a big event every few years. I hope he will publish another huge book of his works or lead a little revolution somewhere. That would be fun.

Banksy stencil art Shop Until You Drop Ulrich Blanché on <em>Banksy: Urban Art in a Material World</em>

Originally written in German and published by TectumBanksy: Urban Art in a Material World has been translated into English and is available here.

Interview conducted and edited by Lois Stavsky; images 2, 4 & 5 Creative Commons & 3 captured by Lenny Collado in NYC

{ 0 comments }

                     stik street art UK London Based Stik on: <em>Magpie</em>, the Sale of Street Art Pieces, the Upcoming Phillips Auction and Fundraising for the Community

London-based Stik – one of our favorite street artists — recently announced that he had signed, dated and authenticated an original street art work to be auctioned at Phillips this coming Thursday, December 8.  We spoke to him about it:

Can you tell us something about this particular piece? Where was it first painted? And when?

This piece was painted in 2009 on the former Magpie Social Centre in Bristol, England.

What was the significance of the particular space to you at the time?

Bristol was the capital of street art at the time, and Magpie had always opened their doors to me when I took the four-hour coach trip down from London. Earlier this year, Magpie contacted me and asked me to help them raise funds to relocate after they were suddenly evicted from a building where they’d been for about a decade.

stik street art bristol London Based Stik on: <em>Magpie</em>, the Sale of Street Art Pieces, the Upcoming Phillips Auction and Fundraising for the Community

Selling artwork that had once been in a public space is quite controversial. Have you any thoughts about that?

By working directly with communities in order to manage their artworks, we are trying to preserve the true social nature of street art in a creative way that benefits that community without negatively impacting the artist. All proceeds go back to the community the artworks were painted for.

Have you authenticated other works? If so, can you tell us a bit about them?

Most of my murals have a strong social meaning and that is represented by where the proceeds are allocated. There have been two others — a satellite dish and a garage door from 2012 — that raised money for local organizations in Hackney, East London. This wooden panel from the old Magpie building will help build a new Magpie Project Space to support a new generation of artists.

stik street art London1 London Based Stik on: <em>Magpie</em>, the Sale of Street Art Pieces, the Upcoming Phillips Auction and Fundraising for the Community

Whom can folks contact if they are interested in acquiring the work?

This piece is going through Phillips London who have been very generous in their support for the sale. Lot 90, New Now Sale, Phillips London 8th Dec 2016. A log of all authenticated street pieces can be seen here

Interview by Lois Stavsky; images courtesy of the artist

Note: Hailed in a range of media from the Huffington Post to the New York Times, our Street Art NYC App is now available for Android devices here.

en play badge 2 London Based Stik on: <em>Magpie</em>, the Sale of Street Art Pieces, the Upcoming Phillips Auction and Fundraising for the Community

{ 0 comments }

CHema Skandal paints Speaking with Graphic Artist and Music Enthusiast CHema Skandal!

On our recent visit to Chicago, we discovered the delightfully playful aesthetic of the hugely talented and prolific graphic artist and music enthusiast CHema Skandal! An interview with the artist follows:

I love your artwork’s playful, spirited – often-irreverent – sensibility. What is your main inspiration? The roots of your aesthetic?

I grew up in Mexico City, and its distinct culture has inspired my aesthetic. I was influenced by everything I saw around me – hand-painted street signs, eye-catching graphic designs, everyday visual communication… Popular culture, in general, – and particularly music – is a constant inspiration. And since coming to Chicago, my work has been influenced by what I see here.

CHemaSkandal street art Speaking with Graphic Artist and Music Enthusiast CHema Skandal!

On visiting Pilsen, we came upon a mural that you painted. When did you first paint on the streets?

Yes, that was precisely the first time I painted on the streets. The first mural I ever did is here in Chicago.

What inspired you to paint a mural in a public space?

That mural in Pilsen was commissioned by a city cultural program. It coincided with me wanting to explore and try a different medium like this. At the same time I met Oscar Arriola  and Brooks Golden (RIP) who brought me into street art and  exposed me to many graffiti and mural artists. Reflecting on it, I had done some wheat pasting before while promoting concerts or sociopolitical topics.

CHema Skandal street art unmasked Speaking with Graphic Artist and Music Enthusiast CHema Skandal!

How does Chicago’s street art and underground art scene differ from Mexico City’s?

A decade ago it was easy to find stickers and wheatpastings within the city. But there have been mural and graffiti artists for longer, and really good ones. Mainly in the outskirts. I don’t have this background so I can not tell you much about this but I think in many ways they are very similar. Mexico City is one of the biggest cities in the world so you can find practically any type of art, being it independent or more affiliated to culture organizations or brands. I feel that the scene here in Chicago is more open. Here I was embraced and welcomed by individuals and galleries alike.

Where else have you shown your work – besides here in Chicago and back in Mexico City?

I’ve shown in different places, from alternative spaces and libraries to galleries and museums. Among the cities I’ve exhibited in are: Toulouse, Lyon, Berlin, Madrid, Barcelona, Addis Ababa, Kingston, Puebla, Oaxaca, Tokyo and here in the U.S.

CHema Skandal exhibit Speaking with Graphic Artist and Music Enthusiast CHema Skandal!

Do you have a formal art education?

Yes. I studied Visual Communication & Illustration at U.N.A.M.’s National School of Art.

How do you feel about the role of social media in all of this?

I was the last one to use it! I think it can be overwhelming, but it has become a helpful platform for us artists to share our work and promote ourselves.

And is your artwork the main source of your income?

Yes, as of right now I am lucky my illustration work is steady. My projects range from publicity — like flyers, magazine illustrations and printed posters —  to commissioned art.

chema skandal mural art with people Speaking with Graphic Artist and Music Enthusiast CHema Skandal!

Can you tell us something about your process?

Almost everything I create is by hand. I work with inks, acrylics and oils. I usually start a project like that and then transfer it to the computer to finish it off. I especially enjoy the painting process. I like the organic texture of what I can produce that way. I’ve also studied traditional printing techniques. Lately I’ve been getting back into block printing, one of the first mediums I learned. I find it interesting how you can reproduce prints and also the history of it.

Any favorite artists? Artists who’ve influenced you?

I like and admire many, mainly for their unique way to represent their visions. Among my favorites are: the late Mexican artist Jose Guadalupe Posada; the American comic artist Charles Burns and the satirical street artist Banksy.. I also like American and Cuban poster makers from the 60’s.

CHema Skandal installation Speaking with Graphic Artist and Music Enthusiast CHema Skandal!

How has your work evolved through the years?

I think as an artist you are always learning from others. I’ve discovered work that inspires me and makes me want to emulate a technique and try it. Most of the time during this experience you find something that fits your work, like with Street Art in my case. I am still exploring it. My work has changed and I hope it keeps evolving.

What do you see as the role of the artist in society?

I think an artist is an amplifier of society. Artists should stimulate the feelings and ideas that are hard to digest. This can be very subjective of course but in the end that is where the individual’s sensitivity should focus on. An artist should reflect on the social movements of our time.

CHema Skandal street art characters Speaking with Graphic Artist and Music Enthusiast CHema Skandal!

What’s ahead?

I would like to learn old painting techniques that are not in use anymore. And to find a residency in a far deserted island.

Sounds good!

 All photos courtesy of  the artist; interview by Lois Stavsky with Tara Murray

Hailed in a range of media from the Huffington Post to the New York Times, our Street Art NYC App is now available for Android devices here.

en play badge 2 Speaking with Graphic Artist and Music Enthusiast CHema Skandal!

{ 0 comments }

Pablo Machioli and Gaia street art Baltimore In Baltimore: Gaia & Pablo Machioli, Decertor, Ernest Shaw, Jessie & Katey, LNY, Betsy Casanas, Nanook, Billy Mode and Michael Owen

On our recent visit to Baltimore, we revisited several older murals, discovered some newer ones and came upon some of our favorite artists at work.  Pictured above is Gaia with Pablo Machioli to his left, taking a break from working on their now-completed mural for Open Works.  Here are several more images that we captured:

Peruvian artist Daniel Cortez aka Decertor for Open Walls Baltimore

Daniel Cortez Decertor street art Baltimore In Baltimore: Gaia & Pablo Machioli, Decertor, Ernest Shaw, Jessie & Katey, LNY, Betsy Casanas, Nanook, Billy Mode and Michael Owen

Baltimore-based Ernest Shaw, Jr for Open Walls Baltimore

ernest shaw jr street art baltimore In Baltimore: Gaia & Pablo Machioli, Decertor, Ernest Shaw, Jessie & Katey, LNY, Betsy Casanas, Nanook, Billy Mode and Michael Owen

Baltimore-based Jessie Unterhalter & Katey Truhn, close-up from huge mural for Open Walls Baltimore

Jessie and katey street art baltimore In Baltimore: Gaia & Pablo Machioli, Decertor, Ernest Shaw, Jessie & Katey, LNY, Betsy Casanas, Nanook, Billy Mode and Michael Owen

Newark-based LNY / Layqa Nuna Yawar, close-up for Open Walls Baltimore

LNY street art Baltimore In Baltimore: Gaia & Pablo Machioli, Decertor, Ernest Shaw, Jessie & Katey, LNY, Betsy Casanas, Nanook, Billy Mode and Michael Owen

Philadelphia native Betsy Casanas for Open Walls Baltimore

Betsy Casanas street art baltimore edited 1 In Baltimore: Gaia & Pablo Machioli, Decertor, Ernest Shaw, Jessie & Katey, LNY, Betsy Casanas, Nanook, Billy Mode and Michael Owen

Baltimore-based Nanook for Open Walls Baltimore

nanook street art Baltimore In Baltimore: Gaia & Pablo Machioli, Decertor, Ernest Shaw, Jessie & Katey, LNY, Betsy Casanas, Nanook, Billy Mode and Michael Owen

Baltimore-based Billy Mode at work

Billy Mode mural in progress In Baltimore: Gaia & Pablo Machioli, Decertor, Ernest Shaw, Jessie & Katey, LNY, Betsy Casanas, Nanook, Billy Mode and Michael Owen

Baltimore-based Michael Owen, close-up 

Michael owen street art baltimore In Baltimore: Gaia & Pablo Machioli, Decertor, Ernest Shaw, Jessie & Katey, LNY, Betsy Casanas, Nanook, Billy Mode and Michael Owen

Photo credits: 1, 2 & 7 Tara Murray; 3-6, 8 & 9 Lois Stavsky

Note: Hailed in a range of media from the Huffington Post to the New York Times, our Street Art NYC App is now available for Android devices here.

en play badge 2 In Baltimore: Gaia & Pablo Machioli, Decertor, Ernest Shaw, Jessie & Katey, LNY, Betsy Casanas, Nanook, Billy Mode and Michael Owen

{ 0 comments }

eleven spring book cover ELBOW TOE on Eleven Spring, Wooster Collective, Street Art and more

To celebrate the launch of the new book from Wooster CollectiveELEVEN SPRING: A CELEBRATION OF STREET ART, artist ELBOW-TOE remembers the historic event and its impact on the world of street art.

I was talking to a younger artist the other day about street art that I was involved in as opposed to murals — which she considers street art — and she said, “Oh, you mean vandalism.”

How did we get here?

elbow toe 11 spring ELBOW TOE on Eleven Spring, Wooster Collective, Street Art and more

I recall the moment that I knew I wanted to be a street artist – I was at work, and one afternoon, my friend pointed me to this post on a blog I had never heard of called Wooster Collective. It was an image by an artist who had photoshopped street signs, so that they looked transparent from the correct angle. It was absolutely magical. How did it get there? Who was the artist? I had seen some street art around over the years: WK Interact when I was in school in the early 90’s and around the early 2000’s quite a bit of NECKFACE around the corner from a print shop I was using.

wk interact 11 spring ELBOW TOE on Eleven Spring, Wooster Collective, Street Art and more

As I began to explore the archives of Wooster Collective, I saw that there was in fact a community that had built up around these random acts of art that I had paid little heed beyond the internal “huh, that’s interesting.” What was truly fascinating about the work was that, aside from a moniker, the work was anonymous. In that anonymity there existed a mystery. It elevated even the most banal work, purely by the act of risk that was involved. And for the first time in over a decade in the city, it pulled me out of my tunnel vision and got me looking at the walls as spaces to be activated.

11 spring Street ELBOW TOE on Eleven Spring, Wooster Collective, Street Art and more

The Wooster Collective site was such an impeccably curated space that it got people outside of the movement to give it their attention. Having known the Schillers over those early years, I, of course, was head over heels when I was asked not only to be involved in their secret project but to be given a coveted space on the main floor. At the time I don’t think any of us realized that this exhibition would have the impact that it did.

sheard fairey at work 11 spring ELBOW TOE on Eleven Spring, Wooster Collective, Street Art and more

11 Spring was truly a transformative exhibition; it reflected the very transition that would occur wholeheartedly in this movement just by walking from the outside of the building to the inside. The exterior of the building still had the raw power of getting your work up. The work was often messy and might last only a few hours before being covered by a new piece. Contrast the organic energy of the ever-changing composition on the shell with an impeccably curated show inside the five floors of a gutted building, where all these artists were able to truly flex their technical and creative muscles without concern of the work being damaged or transformed by others.

barnstormers 11 spring ELBOW TOE on Eleven Spring, Wooster Collective, Street Art and more

It was this mercurial quality of traveling from the outside to the inside and then back out again that gave this show such power in my opinion. I am not sure that there is a direct correlation of this show to the mural program that followed, but it certainly opened a larger audience up to the possibilities of their public spaces’ potential.

I will always cherish the experience.

Judith Supine David Zucco ELBOW TOE on Eleven Spring, Wooster Collective, Street Art and more

Note: With its outstanding documentation, along with an introduction by Shepard Fairey and an afterword by JR,  ELEVEN SPRING: A CELEBRATION OF STREET ART captures an important moment in the history of the movement. Tomorrow, Tuesday, November 29 — from 6:30 to 8:00 PM – Marc and Sara Schiller, along with FAILE, Lady Pink, Michael DeFeo, and WK Interact, will be at the Strand for a special signing and celebration of the book’s launch. You can buy tickets to the event here

Images 

1.  COVER, ELEVEN SPRING: A CELEBRATION OF STREET ART

2.  ELBOW-TOE  (BRIAN ADAM DOUGLAS), EVERYBODY’S GOT ONE, MADE WITH WOOD BURNER, YARN, AND PAINT. PHOTO ELBOW-TOE

3.  WK INTERACT, THE FIRST ARTIST INVITED INSIDE THE BUILDING. PHOTO JAKE DOBKIN 

4.  11 SPRING STREET, THE DAY OF THE OPENING. PHOTO JAKE DOBKIN 

5.  SHEPARD FAIREY, HARD AT WORK, MAKING IT LOOK EASY. PHOTO WOOSTER COLLECTIVE 

6.  BARNSTORMERS’ COLLABORATION WITH PAINTINGS BY Z¥$, DOZE GREEN AND KENJI HIRATA. PHOTO JAKE DOBKIN

7  JUDITH SUPINE AND DAVIDE ZUCCO (R3KAL), THERE IS HELL IN HELLO. PHOTO DONALD DIETZ 

{ 0 comments }

joe iurato  Joe Iurato Fashions His Signature Cutouts for Washington DC Tour of Red Bull Flying Bach Dancers

This past summer, Red Bull reached out to Joe Iurato — one of our favorite artists — to create his signature wooden cutouts to help support and promote the upcoming Washington DC tour dates of Red Bull Flying Bach, a new dance tour that fuses classical music, break dancing and modern dance, set to Bach’s “The Well-Tempered Clavier.”

An interview with the artist follows:

Can you tell us something about the process of creating your distinct cutouts? 

It begins with a photograph of a central subject and a story in mind. Once I have the image I want to work with, I create my layer separations for the stencils.  I don’t use a computer program or a filter to create my layers. I just print the photo out multiple times in black and white at the exact size I want the wood cutout to be. Then, I cut my stencil layers by working directly from the unaltered photos, more or less drawing the tones loosely with a knife.  Once my stencils are cut, I make an impression of the first layer, a silhouette, on a piece of wood.

And how does the piece get cut? At what point is it ready for placement?

The piece gets cut on a scroll saw, which is good for making cuts up to 24”, as it has a thin blade and allows me to maneuver intricate cuts. The cut then gets sanded and primed. Then, I lay in my stencils – spraying them one layer at a time. When the piece is completed, I’ll varnish and seal it. Lastly, I’ll add any hardware to make it stand, float, whatever– all depending on the intended interaction. At that point, the piece is ready for placement.

Joe iurato cutout breaking Joe Iurato Fashions His Signature Cutouts for Washington DC Tour of Red Bull Flying Bach Dancers

How do you decide where it will be placed?

Sometimes I know where the completed work will be placed; other times, it’s a matter of hunting for the right location. I always install them by myself, mounting them securely. The challenge is finding a location where they will last for awhile! For this project, Red Bull is securing several locations, based on where they will work best, for 10-12 of my 16″ pieces. Three similar large scale wood cut pieces — roughly 6 feet tall — will be on display from January 6-8th at the Warner Theater for the DC performances of Red Bull Flying Bach.

How long does it generally take to create a 16 inch piece? 

It depends on the level of detail in the particular  piece and where I am in the process. If I’m going from initial concept through to final, then it usually takes me about three to four days to create the first one. But once the stencils are cut and it’s a matter of ripping wood cutouts and spraying them out, I can make duplicates within a day.

drew gurian photo of Joe Iurato Joe Iurato Fashions His Signature Cutouts for Washington DC Tour of Red Bull Flying Bach Dancers

How does creating this work for Red Bull differ from the way you generally work?

I generally work from my own imagery, but in this case, Red Bull has provided me with photographs of the Red Bull Flying Bach dancers to work with and is involved in securing locations. As I don’t know specific locations, I’ve chosen a variety of movements that could work in a range of location.

Can you tell us a bit about your experience of working with Red Bull? 

It’s been very exciting. I, myself, was once a breakdancer! And Red Bull has given me complete creative freedom — something very important to my artistic process.

joe iurato dancer Joe Iurato Fashions His Signature Cutouts for Washington DC Tour of Red Bull Flying Bach Dancers

Special thanks to Karin du Maire who met up with Joe Iurato at Red Bull Studios in Chelsea last week.

Photo credits: 1 & 4 Karin du Maire; 2 & 3 Drew Gurian, courtesy Red Bull

Note: Red Bull Flying Bach dancers will be performing in DC at the Warner Theater, January 6-8. Check out dates of all upcoming shows here

{ 0 comments }

beyond graffiti Speaking With Travel and Street Photographer Karin du Maire

Since we first discovered Karin du Maire‘s Instagram account, we’ve been fans of her hugely impressive documentation of street art and graffiti. We recently had the opportunity to sit down with her.

We love your documentation of the current street art and graffiti scene – in NYC and in your travels. When did you first turn your lens to urban culture, particularly street art?  

As a travel photographer, I developed a strong interest in urban culture in 2006 while in Rio de Janeiro photographing Passinho dancers in the city’s favelas. At about that time, I started paying more attention to the background, and I began using abandoned buildings as settings. And back here in NYC, I often combined my visits to MoMA PS1 in Long Island City with 5Pointz, where I particularly loved photographing B-boy battles.

meres gaffiti and hip hop 5Pointz nyc Speaking With Travel and Street Photographer Karin du Maire

Are you formally trained as a photographer?

No, I studied Business, and I earned an MBA degree from the Vrije Universiteit in Amsterdam. But I’ve taken courses in photography at SVA and I’ve participated in B&H’s Event Space workshops. I also ran a Twitter chat focusing on photography.

When did you first become interested in photography? 

It was a passion of mine in the late 80’s and early 90’s. And then in the late 90’s, I began getting paid assignments as a travel photographer.

You’ve photographed dozens of artists at work. How have they responded to you?

In general, they’ve been very welcoming. They appreciate my photography skills and the exposure that I offer them. I always ask for permission first, and I share my photos with them. Many artists have become my friends, and it is fun to chat and watch them paint.

icy and sot street art welling court nyc Speaking With Travel and Street Photographer Karin du Maire

What are some of the challenges that you face in the work you are now doing?

Keeping up with all that is happening on the streets; wanting to capture an image when the light is wrong or when there are cars in the way, and trying to help artists by arranging walls for them.

What — would you say — is your current mission?

There is an intrinsic reward in what I am doing – documenting creativity and helping artists grow. And coming from a travel photography background, I would like to get sponsored to photograph street art in different places.

Do you have any particularly memorable experiences from your work here in NYC?

Watching Nychos paint at Coney Art Walls – his amazing raw energy as he sketched freehand.

nychos street art coney islandJPG Speaking With Travel and Street Photographer Karin du Maire

Any favorite cities?

Rio de Janeiro and London are among my favorites.

Any proud accomplishments from documenting art on the streets?

My proudest accomplishments generally involve capturing someone in the right place at the right time. It’s the split second that makes the difference! I was so happy, for example, to meet and photograph Sebas Rivas from Córdoba in Argentina while he was sitting aside, off on his own — selling his delightful artwork – amidst all the activity at Art Basel in Miami last year.

sebas rivas art wynwood Speaking With Travel and Street Photographer Karin du Maire

We’ve noticed that you use your iPhone as opposed to a standard camera to capture images.

Yes. I use the iPhone to photograph just about everything that is not an assignment. Most cameras these days are good. What matters is not the camera – but the eye of the photographer… the composition, the light, the moment. In addition, iPhones are less intimidating than huge cameras. And the entire process is shorter, as I have very little editing to do.

What’s ahead for you?

I’m now off to Art Basel in Miami and I am planning to return soon to Cuba, where there is a burgeoning street art scene.

Where do you think street art and graffiti are headed?

Street art will continue to beautify our cities. It will continue to become more mainstream, and there will be more opportunities for artists. I also suspect that there will be more art activism.

ces graffiti nyc Speaking With Travel and Street Photographer Karin du Maire

Thank you! And do keep on doing what you are doing! We love it!

Images

1. Beyond on LIC rooftop

2. Meres mural in background with b-boys at 5Pointz in LIC

3. Icy and Sot in Astoria with the Welling Court Mural Project

4. Nychos at work for Coney Art Walls with Martha Cooper with camera

5. Sebas Rivas in Miami

6. Ces photographing his mural at Broadway Junction

All images © Karin du Maire

Interview conducted by Lois Stavsky with Tara Murray

{ 0 comments }

 Francisco de Pájaro aka Art Is Trash on NYC Streets and at Castle Fitzjohns Gallery to November 30

With his delightfully unorthodox approach to both art and the streets, Francisco de Pájaro aka Art Is Trash recently brought his vision to NYC.  What follows is a glimpse into the man and his whimsically provocative work:

The completed piece pictured above — in his solo exhibit MATURA – as seen at Castle Fitzjohns Gallery 

art as trash with book Francisco de Pájaro aka Art Is Trash on NYC Streets and at Castle Fitzjohns Gallery to November 30

With Art Is Trash‘s newly published book to its right

art is trash book Francisco de Pájaro aka Art Is Trash on NYC Streets and at Castle Fitzjohns Gallery to November 30

The artist at work 

 Francisco de Pájaro aka Art Is Trash on NYC Streets and at Castle Fitzjohns Gallery to November 30

art as trash paints Francisco de Pájaro aka Art Is Trash on NYC Streets and at Castle Fitzjohns Gallery to November 30

Segments of MATAÚRA

art as trash gallery exhibit Francisco de Pájaro aka Art Is Trash on NYC Streets and at Castle Fitzjohns Gallery to November 30

art is trash gallery Francisco de Pájaro aka Art Is Trash on NYC Streets and at Castle Fitzjohns Gallery to November 30

Castle Fitzjohns Gallery, exterior

art as trash gallery exterior Francisco de Pájaro aka Art Is Trash on NYC Streets and at Castle Fitzjohns Gallery to November 30

And the artist with noted photographer Donna Feratto

donna ferrato art as trashJPG Francisco de Pájaro aka Art Is Trash on NYC Streets and at Castle Fitzjohns Gallery to November 30

The exhibit remains on view until November 3oth at Castle Fitzjohns Gallery, 95 Orchard Street, on Manhattan’s Lower East Side.

Photo credits: 1, 4 & 5 Audrey Connolly aka Bytegirl; 2, 6 – 8 Karin du Maire and 9 Lois Stavsky

{ 0 comments }

Logan Hicks freddy Grays Day <em>Baltimore Rising</em> at Maryland Institute College of Art with Logan Hicks, Tony Shore, Nether 410 and more

On exhibit through Wednesday at MICA — the Maryland Institute College of Art — is Baltimore Rising, a powerful and poignant exhibition featuring the works of 15 artists who address the issues that led to the uprising following the death of Freddy Gray.  Featured above is a close-up from Logan Hicks’s Freddy Gray’s Day. What follows are a few more images from this timely exhibit:

Logan Hicks, Hot Spot, aerosol on linen

Logan Hicks Hot Spot <em>Baltimore Rising</em> at Maryland Institute College of Art with Logan Hicks, Tony Shore, Nether 410 and more

Tony Shore, Hands Up, Don’t Shoot, acrylic on velvet

tony shore hands up dont shoot <em>Baltimore Rising</em> at Maryland Institute College of Art with Logan Hicks, Tony Shore, Nether 410 and more

Tony Shore, Confrontation, acrylic on velvet

tony shore confrontation <em>Baltimore Rising</em> at Maryland Institute College of Art with Logan Hicks, Tony Shore, Nether 410 and more

Also by Tony Shore, The Vigil, acrylic on velvet

tony shore the vigil <em>Baltimore Rising</em> at Maryland Institute College of Art with Logan Hicks, Tony Shore, Nether 410 and more

Nether 410, Satyagraha, outdoor mural for Baltimore Rising

Nether410 Baltimore Rising <em>Baltimore Rising</em> at Maryland Institute College of Art with Logan Hicks, Tony Shore, Nether 410 and more

Photo credits: 1-5 Lois Stavsky; 6 Tara Murray

{ 0 comments }

This is the twelfth in a series of posts featuring the range of faces have surfaced in NYC open spaces:

Werc in Bedford-Stuyvesant with the Open Society Foundations

werc bk Faces in NYC Open Spaces, Part XII: Werc, Vexta with Askew, Joel Artista, LMNOPI, Cern, Thiago Valdi and Leticia Mandragora

Vexta and Askew in Williamsburg for the Greenest Point, one fragment of huge mural

Vexta and askew street art nyc Faces in NYC Open Spaces, Part XII: Werc, Vexta with Askew, Joel Artista, LMNOPI, Cern, Thiago Valdi and Leticia Mandragora

Joel Bergner aka Joel Artista in Bellerose, Queens with the DOT

joel artista street art queens Faces in NYC Open Spaces, Part XII: Werc, Vexta with Askew, Joel Artista, LMNOPI, Cern, Thiago Valdi and Leticia Mandragora

LMNOPI in Long Island City with Arts Org

LMNOPI street art nyc Faces in NYC Open Spaces, Part XII: Werc, Vexta with Askew, Joel Artista, LMNOPI, Cern, Thiago Valdi and Leticia Mandragora

Cern in Williamsburg, close-up

cern street art williamsburg Faces in NYC Open Spaces, Part XII: Werc, Vexta with Askew, Joel Artista, LMNOPI, Cern, Thiago Valdi and Leticia Mandragora

Thiago Valdi in Staten Island with the NYC Arts Cypher

thiago valdi street art staten island Faces in NYC Open Spaces, Part XII: Werc, Vexta with Askew, Joel Artista, LMNOPI, Cern, Thiago Valdi and Leticia Mandragora

Leticia Mandragora, Bushwick 

leticia mandragora street art bushwick nyc Faces in NYC Open Spaces, Part XII: Werc, Vexta with Askew, Joel Artista, LMNOPI, Cern, Thiago Valdi and Leticia Mandragora

 Photo credits: 1, 3 & 7 Tara Murray: 2, 4-6 Lois Stavsky

Hailed in a range of media from the Huffington Post to the New York Times, our Street Art NYC App is now available for Android devices here.

en play badge 2 Faces in NYC Open Spaces, Part XII: Werc, Vexta with Askew, Joel Artista, LMNOPI, Cern, Thiago Valdi and Leticia Mandragora

{ 0 comments }