Street Artists

toxicomano mural art gama mexico city A Visit to GAMA, a Creative Urban Arts Space, in Mexico City

While in Mexico City several weeks ago, I had the chance to visit GAMA, a distinctly impressive artists’ space and gallery in Colonia Hipódromo, and speak to its founder, Daniel Martinez and his partner, Kas Chudleigh.

This is such a wonderful space with so much positive energy. Can you tell us a bit about GAMA? There are quite a few people here. Who are you?

We are a group of artists that seek to nurture each other and others by collaborating, offering workshops, showcasing our work and providing opportunities for creatives.

root rises art graphic art mama mexico city A Visit to GAMA, a Creative Urban Arts Space, in Mexico City

How long have you been in this particular space? It is ideal.

We’ve been here on the ground floor of Comitán 10, Hipódromo since June 30th.

How would you describe GAMA‘s mission?

With a particular focus on street art and urban art, we work with a diverse group of graphic designers, illustrators, photographers and muralists. We perceive the GAMA space as an education and resource center that offers a wide range of events, talks and exhibits, along with opportunities to collaborate with brands.

Yolka graphic design A Visit to GAMA, a Creative Urban Arts Space, in Mexico City

Can you give us some examples of the workshops offered here?

Upcoming workshops include: watercolor painting with Diego Andrad; working with 3-D in the gif format with Chacalall, and designing illustrations with Yolka Mx.

You’ve also curated outdoor murals. I visited the one painted by Werc and Gera Luz earlier today. When did you first become interested in street art? 

In 2005 — over 10 years ago — I started creating stickers and wheatpastes. I also began following online what was happening throughout the globe, and then I spent time in Berlin and Barcelona, where I saw so much amazing art on public spaces.

Werc and gera luz street art mexico city A Visit to GAMA, a Creative Urban Arts Space, in Mexico City

What would you say is your greatest challenge at this point?

The major one is attaining the support we need to maintain the space.

What’s ahead? Any particular projects — besides all the wonderful things happening here?

We’d like to produce a series of documentaries about some of the artists we work with. We are especially interested in the creative process. What motivates and inspires artists? We’re also interested in establishing alliances with different cultural projects in Mexico and connecting to more emerging artists.

gleo colombian artist gama A Visit to GAMA, a Creative Urban Arts Space, in Mexico City

It all sounds great! How can folks contact you if they would like to visit or become involved?

They can contact us at contacto@gamacrea.com. They can also follow us on Instagram and on Facebook.

Images

1. Toxicómano

2. Root Rises

3. Yolka Mx

4. Werc and Gera Luz

5. Gleo

Photos and interview by Lois Stavsky 

Note: Hailed in a range of media from the Huffington Post to the New York Times, our Street Art NYC App is now available for Android devices here.

en play badge 2 A Visit to GAMA, a Creative Urban Arts Space, in Mexico City

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Jenaro stencil street art Mexico City Speaking with <em>Street Art Chilango</em> Founders: Jenaro de Rosenzweig & Alejandro Revilla

While in Mexico City last month, I had the opportunity to meet up with Jenaro de Rosenzweig and Alejandro Revilla, founders of the hugely popular Street Art Chilango.

Just what is Street Art Chilango?

It is a company dedicated to promoting street art. Three divisions have evolved: 1. Social networking on Instagram, Facebook and Snapchat; 2. Private and group tours that focus on street art in the city’s center and 3. Securing mural commissions for artists, many of whom are our friends, in both public and private spaces.

When was Street Art Chilango launched?

We launched it on March 7, 2013.

jenaro visual craft stencil art Mexico City Speaking with <em>Street Art Chilango</em> Founders: Jenaro de Rosenzweig & Alejandro Revilla

How did you and Alex meet? And how did you end up collaborating?

We met in Barcelona several years ago, and discovered — almost at once — that we shared a love for street art.  I then went on my own to Berlin where I hung out with street artists and often ended up starting to paint at 3am in the morning! When I returned to Mexico, my ex- girlfriend suggested that I learn about the street art here in my own city. And so after taking photos, I decided to start a Facebook fan page and Alex — who had returned earlier to Mexico City —  installed an API to search for the hashtag #streetartchilango on Instagram. That’s how it all began!

And what about the tours? What spurred you to start offering tours?

Since so few people seemed to know about the amazing street art here in Mexico City, sharing it with others seemed like the logical next step. And once we began offering tours, we then set up our office here in the center of town.

street art chilango crew mexico city Speaking with <em>Street Art Chilango</em> Founders: Jenaro de Rosenzweig & Alejandro Revilla

What about commissions? When and how did that start?

In October of that year, we were approached by a book publishing company, and so our first joint project was launched.

And since that first year? Who have some of your clients been?

We’ve done murals and live painting for restaurants, hotels, businesses and a range of companies from Starbucks to Facebook.

street art chilango Mexico City Speaking with <em>Street Art Chilango</em> Founders: Jenaro de Rosenzweig & Alejandro Revilla

What would you say are some of your challenges?

Continually striving to be the best we can be despite distractions and staying true to the spirit of street art when dealing with commercial enterprises.

You two have worked together now for over three years. What would you say is the key to your successful collaboration?

We are both passionate about street art, but our experiences and backgrounds are different. I studied Electrical Engineering and Finance, and Alex has a strong background in Social Media. And so we bring different strengths to Street Art Chilango.

i o u street art mexico city Speaking with <em>Street Art Chilango</em> Founders: Jenaro de Rosenzweig & Alejandro Revilla

How can folks best contact you?

They can drop us an email at contacto@streetartchilango.com

Images 

1. Jenaro‘s famed colorful dog

2. One of Jenaro‘s signature Star Wars works

3. & 4. Commissioned murals painted by Street Art Chilango artists

5. A rotating outdoor canvas curated by Street Art Chilango, this one painted by IOU

Photos and interview by Lois Stavsky

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apitatan street art mexico city <em>Meeting of Styles</em> in Mexico City: Apitatan, Diego Zelaya, Musa71, Cyfione, Main Rodriguez, YuzuRabia, Astro and Shane Hello

Among the most exuberant walls in Mexico City are those painted by both local and international artists during the city’s Meeting of Styles festival. I first discovered them on a tour with Street Art Chilangoand then I kept on returning to them. Above is the work of Ecuadorian artist Apitatan. Here are several more:

Mexican painter Diego Zelaya

Diego Zelaya street art Mexico City <em>Meeting of Styles</em> in Mexico City: Apitatan, Diego Zelaya, Musa71, Cyfione, Main Rodriguez, YuzuRabia, Astro and Shane Hello

Barcelona-based writer Musa 71

Musa71 graffiti mexico city <em>Meeting of Styles</em> in Mexico City: Apitatan, Diego Zelaya, Musa71, Cyfione, Main Rodriguez, YuzuRabia, Astro and Shane Hello

Tucson-based Cyfione

cyfione jpg <em>Meeting of Styles</em> in Mexico City: Apitatan, Diego Zelaya, Musa71, Cyfione, Main Rodriguez, YuzuRabia, Astro and Shane Hello

Main Rodriguez

main rodriguez graffiti mexico city <em>Meeting of Styles</em> in Mexico City: Apitatan, Diego Zelaya, Musa71, Cyfione, Main Rodriguez, YuzuRabia, Astro and Shane Hello

Mexican artist YuzuRabia

yuzurabia street art mexico city <em>Meeting of Styles</em> in Mexico City: Apitatan, Diego Zelaya, Musa71, Cyfione, Main Rodriguez, YuzuRabia, Astro and Shane Hello

French artists Astro and Shane Hello

astro odv cbs shane hello graffiti Mexico City <em>Meeting of Styles</em> in Mexico City: Apitatan, Diego Zelaya, Musa71, Cyfione, Main Rodriguez, YuzuRabia, Astro and Shane Hello

Photos by Lois Stavsky; special thanks to Caro for identifying so many of the artists as I was posting Mexico City’s street art on Instagram earlier this month.

Note: Hailed in a range of media from the Huffington Post to the New York Times, our Street Art NYC App is now available for Android devices here.

en play badge 2 <em>Meeting of Styles</em> in Mexico City: Apitatan, Diego Zelaya, Musa71, Cyfione, Main Rodriguez, YuzuRabia, Astro and Shane Hello

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Teleache street art Mexico City In Azcapotzalco, Mexico City: Tellaeche, Diana Bama, Pyska, Sego and More Mural Art

Shortly after I arrived in Mexico City earlier this month, I met up with the wonderfully knowledgeable Soylo. Passionate about the art that surfaces in public spaces — and always eager to explore and share insights into the minds that inspire it — he has been photographing graffiti and street art in his city since 2007. Among the artworks he introduced me to are a series of murals painted by Mexican artists for the project Memoria. Curated by Colectivo C, they surfaced last year in Azcapotzalco, an industrial district in the northwestern part of Mexico City. The mural pictured above is  by Tellaeche, who had painted here in NYC at the Bushwick Collective. Here are several more murals inspired by the notion of Memory:

Diana Bama

diana bama street art mexico city In Azcapotzalco, Mexico City: Tellaeche, Diana Bama, Pyska, Sego and More Mural Art

To be identified

lefokou7 Gustavo Valdivia street art Mexico City In Azcapotzalco, Mexico City: Tellaeche, Diana Bama, Pyska, Sego and More Mural Art

Pyska

pyska street art mural Mexico City In Azcapotzalco, Mexico City: Tellaeche, Diana Bama, Pyska, Sego and More Mural Art

Simply signed 7z00, a reference to the 43 missing Mexican students

jzoo street art mexico city In Azcapotzalco, Mexico City: Tellaeche, Diana Bama, Pyska, Sego and More Mural Art

And Sego who had painted earlier in East Harlem

sego street art nyc In Azcapotzalco, Mexico City: Tellaeche, Diana Bama, Pyska, Sego and More Mural Art

Special thanks, again, to Soylo for introducing me to artworks I never would have found on my own!

Photos by Lois Stavsky

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mas paz Juan Pineda close up  Vibrant Public Art In Crystal City, Virginia: Mas Paz, Juan Pineda, Jahru, Miss Chelove, Kelly Towles, Ethan Kerber & SatOne

An urban neighborhood in Arlington, Virginia, Crystal City is less than three miles away from DC’s Smithsonian Museums. Thanks to its active BID, it boasts a thriving public art scene, featuring a wide variety of works in a range of styles — many painted by local DC artists. And for us street art aficionados, there is much to love. What follows is a sampling:

DC-based artists Mas Paz and Juan Pineda

Mas Paz close up mural art Vibrant Public Art In Crystal City, Virginia: Mas Paz, Juan Pineda, Jahru, Miss Chelove, Kelly Towles, Ethan Kerber & SatOne

Annapolis, MD-based Jeff Huntington aka Jahru

Jeff Huntington aka Jahru mural art Virginia Vibrant Public Art In Crystal City, Virginia: Mas Paz, Juan Pineda, Jahru, Miss Chelove, Kelly Towles, Ethan Kerber & SatOne

DC-based Cita Sadeli aka Miss Chelove

Miss che love mural art virginia Vibrant Public Art In Crystal City, Virginia: Mas Paz, Juan Pineda, Jahru, Miss Chelove, Kelly Towles, Ethan Kerber & SatOne

DC-based Kelly Towles

Kelly towles street art virginia Vibrant Public Art In Crystal City, Virginia: Mas Paz, Juan Pineda, Jahru, Miss Chelove, Kelly Towles, Ethan Kerber & SatOne

San Francisco-based metal artist Ethan Kerber

ethan kerber street art installation virginia Vibrant Public Art In Crystal City, Virginia: Mas Paz, Juan Pineda, Jahru, Miss Chelove, Kelly Towles, Ethan Kerber & SatOne

Munich, Germany-based SatOne

sat one crystal city virginia street art Vibrant Public Art In Crystal City, Virginia: Mas Paz, Juan Pineda, Jahru, Miss Chelove, Kelly Towles, Ethan Kerber & SatOne

Photo credits: 1, 5 & 6 Lois Stavsky; 2-4 & 7 Tara Murray

Note: Hailed in a range of media from the Huffington Post to the New York Times, our Street Art NYC App is now available for Android devices here.

en play badge 2 Vibrant Public Art In Crystal City, Virginia: Mas Paz, Juan Pineda, Jahru, Miss Chelove, Kelly Towles, Ethan Kerber & SatOne

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robert Proch street art DC  DISTRICT WALLS: Abstract Mural Art in DC by Robert Proch, Reka, Waone, Jessie and Katey, Remi Rough, Above & Jason Woodside

In early fall, Blind Whino x Art Whino brought 10 internationally acclaimed street artists to Washington DC. A melding of abstraction, fine art, graffiti and street art, their murals further enhance DC’s thriving visual landscape. Pictured above is a huge segment of a mural painted by the Polish artist, Robert Proch. Here are several more captured on our recent visit to DC:

Berlin-based Australian artist Reka, segment of huge mural

reka 1 street art dc  DISTRICT WALLS: Abstract Mural Art in DC by Robert Proch, Reka, Waone, Jessie and Katey, Remi Rough, Above & Jason Woodside

 Ukranian artist Waone of Interesni Kazki

waone  DISTRICT WALLS: Abstract Mural Art in DC by Robert Proch, Reka, Waone, Jessie and Katey, Remi Rough, Above & Jason Woodside

Baltimore-based Jessie and Katey

jessie and katey street art dc  DISTRICT WALLS: Abstract Mural Art in DC by Robert Proch, Reka, Waone, Jessie and Katey, Remi Rough, Above & Jason Woodside

UK-based Remi Rough

remi rough street art dc  DISTRICT WALLS: Abstract Mural Art in DC by Robert Proch, Reka, Waone, Jessie and Katey, Remi Rough, Above & Jason Woodside

Berlin-based Above, close-up

above street art DC  DISTRICT WALLS: Abstract Mural Art in DC by Robert Proch, Reka, Waone, Jessie and Katey, Remi Rough, Above & Jason Woodside

NYC-based Jason Woodside

jason woodside street art dc1  DISTRICT WALLS: Abstract Mural Art in DC by Robert Proch, Reka, Waone, Jessie and Katey, Remi Rough, Above & Jason Woodside

Photo credits: 1 & 7 Lois Stavsky; 2-6 Tara Murray

Note: Hailed in a range of media from the Huffington Post to the New York Times, our Street Art NYC App is now available for Android devices here.

en play badge 2  DISTRICT WALLS: Abstract Mural Art in DC by Robert Proch, Reka, Waone, Jessie and Katey, Remi Rough, Above & Jason Woodside

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sticker collage fridge dc  iwillnot on the <em>DC Street Sticker EXPO 3.0</em> at the FridgeDC

Currently on view at the FridgeDC is DC Street Sticker EXPO 3.0, an extraordinary ode to street art stickers. Curated by iwillnot and hosted and sponsored by the Fridge Gallery, it features over 100,000 striking stickers. They’re all here: handsome handstyles, curious characters, political posits and social statements. While in DC, I had the opportunity to speak to iwillnot.

When did you first become involved in the sticker art culture? And what attracted you to it?

It was about ten years ago. I liked the way I could easily transport stickers in my pockets and get them up quickly on the streets.

And what was it about the streets that appealed to you?

Getting my name and message across in a public space.

trump sticker art fridge dc  iwillnot on the <em>DC Street Sticker EXPO 3.0</em> at the FridgeDC

This is the third sticker art exhibit that you’ve curated at the FridgeDC. What inspired you to bring it indoors?

My son was born five years ago. I no longer had the time to hit the streets. Nor could I take the legal risks. DC’s laws are harsh. One can get fined $1,000.00 and be sentenced to 3o days in jail just for getting a slap up.

Gee… And with Trump here, the penalties could get even harsher.  How does this current exhibit differ from the previous two that you curated?

This is the first one that covers the entire gallery. There’s been more involvement, and — with a six-week run — it will be the longest-running sticker expo that I’ve curated.

trump and more sticker art  iwillnot on the <em>DC Street Sticker EXPO 3.0</em> at the FridgeDC

What were some of the challenges involved in curating such a huge exhibit?

It’s quite costly. Getting something like this together is expensive. And it demands endless hours of work, including time spent training volunteers.

How were you able to collect so many stickers? There are tens of thousands here!

When I first started posting my stickers online, Skam reached out to me to trade stickers. I’ve been trading with artists all over the world ever since. Every participant in the expo gets a return pack from me. It takes months to get them mailed out… but a trade is a trade.  After years of trading with artists I have hundreds of thousands of stickers.

Dont Trump Women and more sticker art  iwillnot on the <em>DC Street Sticker EXPO 3.0</em> at the FridgeDC

And how do you keep track of them?

I document each and every entry. I tag each one and acknowledge receiving it.

That must be some task!

It’s a year-round lifestyle.

political sticker art and more  iwillnot on the <em>DC Street Sticker EXPO 3.0</em> at the FridgeDC

How has the response been to this show? The opening was packed with folks of all ages!

The reaction has been great. People seem to have discovered an untapped passion for this art form. All year round, I’m asked about the “next sticker expo.”

How can folks see the exhibit?

It continues through New Years Eve at the FridgeDC, 516 1/2 8th Street SE, and is open Thursday-Saturday 1–8pm & Sunday 1-5pm.

DC sticker expo  iwillnot on the <em>DC Street Sticker EXPO 3.0</em> at the FridgeDC

Great! I’m already looking forward to next year’s!

Note: Among the many artists featured in the above close-ups are: SkamBeas, Klozr, Jamie XV, Ed Geiniwillnot Hugh BrismanSarah JamisonSladge & Konjak, 2front, Psyco, Nikolay Milushevda_weiss, 702er, P Lust, Zas, Chris RWK, nite owl, Feln One,…(more to come!)

Photo credits: 1 Tara Murray; 2 – 6 Lois Stavsky; interview by Lois Stavsky

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syko roxx graffiti urban evolution Baltimore At <em>Urban Evolution </em>in Baltimore with: Syko Roxx, Emo, Spot, 4sakn, Meca, Grope, Veer One, Tiper, Torch Fuego & dlordink

While in Baltimore last month, we had the opportunity to visit Urban Evolution, a first-rate gym that is also a graffiti lover’s wonderland. Pictured above is by Newark-based Syko Roxx. What follows are several more pieces — many by NJ-based writers — that have made their way onto the walls of Urban Evolution:

NJ-based Emo

emo graffiti urban evolution baltimore At <em>Urban Evolution </em>in Baltimore with: Syko Roxx, Emo, Spot, 4sakn, Meca, Grope, Veer One, Tiper, Torch Fuego & dlordink

NYC-based Spot, KMS

spot kms graffiti urban evolution Baltimore At <em>Urban Evolution </em>in Baltimore with: Syko Roxx, Emo, Spot, 4sakn, Meca, Grope, Veer One, Tiper, Torch Fuego & dlordink

NJ-based 4sakn

4 saken graffiti Urban Evolution Baltimore At <em>Urban Evolution </em>in Baltimore with: Syko Roxx, Emo, Spot, 4sakn, Meca, Grope, Veer One, Tiper, Torch Fuego & dlordink

Baltimore-based Meca with fragment of piece by Grope above it

Meca graffiti urban evolution Baltimore At <em>Urban Evolution </em>in Baltimore with: Syko Roxx, Emo, Spot, 4sakn, Meca, Grope, Veer One, Tiper, Torch Fuego & dlordink

NJ-based Veer One

veer one baltimore graffiti At <em>Urban Evolution </em>in Baltimore with: Syko Roxx, Emo, Spot, 4sakn, Meca, Grope, Veer One, Tiper, Torch Fuego & dlordink

 NJ-based Tiper

tiper1 graffiti Baltimore At <em>Urban Evolution </em>in Baltimore with: Syko Roxx, Emo, Spot, 4sakn, Meca, Grope, Veer One, Tiper, Torch Fuego & dlordink

NJ-based Torch Fuego

Torch Fuego graffiti urban evolution baltimore At <em>Urban Evolution </em>in Baltimore with: Syko Roxx, Emo, Spot, 4sakn, Meca, Grope, Veer One, Tiper, Torch Fuego & dlordink

And Baltimore-based dlordink 

dlordink aerosol art urban evolution edited 1 At <em>Urban Evolution </em>in Baltimore with: Syko Roxx, Emo, Spot, 4sakn, Meca, Grope, Veer One, Tiper, Torch Fuego & dlordink

Note: Urban Evolution is located at  6801 Eastern Avenue in Baltimore, MD

Photo credits: 1-3, 5, 6, 8 & 9 Lois Stavsky; 4 & 7 Tara Murray

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dain portrait 1 DAIN Solo Exhibit Continues at <em>Fat Free Art</em> on the Lower East Side

Showcasing established artists, as well as emerging ones, Fat Free Art recently opened in an elegantly gritty space on the corner of Allen and Delancey on Manhattan’s Lower East Side. A dazzling solo exhibit presenting new works by the ever-ingenious Dain has inaugurated the space. Here is a sampling:

dain gallery 1 DAIN Solo Exhibit Continues at <em>Fat Free Art</em> on the Lower East Side

Several more of Dain‘s distinctly beguiling women

dain collaged figure DAIN Solo Exhibit Continues at <em>Fat Free Art</em> on the Lower East Side

dain portrait 720 1 DAIN Solo Exhibit Continues at <em>Fat Free Art</em> on the Lower East Side

dain gallery wide viewJPG 2 DAIN Solo Exhibit Continues at <em>Fat Free Art</em> on the Lower East Side

 And on the street — Allen and Delancey — with Cost & more

dain street art nyc  DAIN Solo Exhibit Continues at <em>Fat Free Art</em> on the Lower East Side

Closer-up

dain closeup slant 1 DAIN Solo Exhibit Continues at <em>Fat Free Art</em> on the Lower East Side

The exhibit – produced in partnership with Street Art Direct — remains on view at 102 Allen Street through January 9.

All photos by Tara Murray

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banksy urban art in a material world edited 1 Ulrich Blanché on <em>Banksy: Urban Art in a Material World</em>

Penned by Ulrich Blanché, Banksy: Urban Art in a Material World focuses primarily on Banksy’s relationship with consumer culture.  With its thoroughly-researched appendix documenting everything from Banksy record album covers to his exhibition catalogs, it is the first comprehensive academic study of Banksy’s art.  An interview with the author follows:

Your book, Banksy: Urban Art in a Material World, began as a dissertational thesis.  Why did you choose to focus your studies on Banksy? What is it specifically about him that so intrigued you?

I was first introduced to street art and stencils in 2006 on a trip to Melbourne, Australia. And while visiting a museum bookshop there, I discovered Banksy’s book Wall and Piece. I was instantly fascinated and found myself going through it page by page. I liked the way each of his pieces has a distinct message or lesson that is transmitted in a humorous way.  I knew then that I would like to research and write about his work.

Banksy stencil art  Ulrich Blanché on <em>Banksy: Urban Art in a Material World</em>

You draw parallels between Banksy and the contemporary British artist Damien Hirst. You discuss their collaborations, as well. Can you tell us something about that?  What are some of the essential similarities between the two? What did each have to gain by collaborating?

It might still shock some people that Hirst, the personification of capitalism, and Banksy, the art guerilla, collaborated. They knew each other since about 2000, and Hirst supported Banksy early on. It was kind of like Warhol and Basquiat.  The established artist gains coolness and the newer artist gains credibility.  The two artists admired each other’s works – and both Banksy and Hirst shared a morbid and humorous sensibility. 

Among Banksy’s subjects are both capitalism and religion – often merged in a particular image.  Do any particular images stand out to you? And why do they?

Banksy does not really focus on religion except in relation to consumption. Shopping/ Money is the god of today. No particular work stands out for me. Some are weaker; some are better.

Banksy in NYC Ulrich Blanché on <em>Banksy: Urban Art in a Material World</em>

To what do you attribute Banksy’s extraordinary commercial success?

I suspect that Banksy actually earns much less than people think he does. His income comes from the sale of prints, books, DVDs… The people who bought a Banksy for 50 quid 15 years ago or received a Banksy as a present have profited  tremendously.

As Banksy rails against consumerism, he — himself — is a master at manipulating consumers.  Why might we have become such a society of consumers? Any thoughts?

We are easily manipulated, even when we know we are being manipulated.

Banksy stencil art creative commons Ulrich Blanché on <em>Banksy: Urban Art in a Material World</em>

How essential are the streets to Banksy’s success?

The street is his canvas – it is the means he uses to communicate. To remove the street from Banksy’s work is like removing a figure from a Rembrandt. If you manage to keep the context with photos, videos, background info, the work may survive indoors – once it’s no longer on the street. In Banksy’s words: “’I don’t know if street art ever really works indoors. If you domesticate an animal, it goes from being wild and free to sterile, fat and sleepy. So maybe the art should stay outside. Then again, some old people get a lot of comfort from having a pet around the house.”

Where is it all going? Will Banksy’s popularity and commercial success continue to rise? Will Banksy continue to use the streets as a canvas? Or will he become less dependent on them? What are your thoughts?

Street Art is over.  Most works on the street today are authorized murals or pieces in areas where the artist wants to be seen and photographed by the “right” people — whoever that might be.  Street art has become urban art for Instagram. Banksy will last. He will put a few works on the street every year and pull off a big event every few years. I hope he will publish another huge book of his works or lead a little revolution somewhere. That would be fun.

Banksy stencil art Shop Until You Drop Ulrich Blanché on <em>Banksy: Urban Art in a Material World</em>

Originally written in German and published by TectumBanksy: Urban Art in a Material World has been translated into English and is available here.

Interview conducted and edited by Lois Stavsky; images 2, 4 & 5 Creative Commons & 3 captured by Lenny Collado in NYC

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