Street Artists

Ron English Temper Tot Ron English Brings His Vision to the Legendary Houston & Bowery Wall

Yesterday famed artist Ron English brought his vision to the legendary wall on Bowery and Houston. We are thrilled that this space is once again serving as Downtown Manhattan’s most exhilarating, rotating, outdoor canvas.

The artist and his mural — to be further enhanced — featuring his iconic Temper Tot and his take on the American flag

Ron English street art Bowery Houston Ron English Brings His Vision to the Legendary Houston & Bowery Wall

Ron English‘s wonderfully sardonic commentary on it all

Ron English mural Bowery NYC Ron English Brings His Vision to the Legendary Houston & Bowery Wall

Another close-up

Ron English political commentary Ron English Brings His Vision to the Legendary Houston & Bowery Wall

Note: Ron English continues to work on his mural on Houston and Bowery; he is to begin painting it today, further enhancing his amazing work!

Photos by Dani Reyes Mozeson

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LMNOPI art Brooklyn Is the Future <em>Brooklyn Is the Future</em> to Open This Evening at the Vazquez in Bushwick: N Carlos J, Chris Soria, Eelco, Marc Evan, Savior Elmundo, Ben Angotti, Rob Plater, LMNOPI and many more

Featuring an awesome array of outdoor and indoor murals, along with a range of smaller works in different media, Brooklyn is the Future opens this evening at the Vazquez at 93 Forrest Street in Bushwick. Here is a small sampling of what I saw when I stopped by yesterday.

Brooklyn is the Future curator, N Carlos J at work.

N Carlos J street art NYC1 <em>Brooklyn Is the Future</em> to Open This Evening at the Vazquez in Bushwick: N Carlos J, Chris Soria, Eelco, Marc Evan, Savior Elmundo, Ben Angotti, Rob Plater, LMNOPI and many more

Chris Soria at work 

Chris Soria paints street art nyc <em>Brooklyn Is the Future</em> to Open This Evening at the Vazquez in Bushwick: N Carlos J, Chris Soria, Eelco, Marc Evan, Savior Elmundo, Ben Angotti, Rob Plater, LMNOPI and many more

 Eelco at work

eelco paints <em>Brooklyn Is the Future</em> to Open This Evening at the Vazquez in Bushwick: N Carlos J, Chris Soria, Eelco, Marc Evan, Savior Elmundo, Ben Angotti, Rob Plater, LMNOPI and many more

Marc Evan at work

Marc Evan paints <em>Brooklyn Is the Future</em> to Open This Evening at the Vazquez in Bushwick: N Carlos J, Chris Soria, Eelco, Marc Evan, Savior Elmundo, Ben Angotti, Rob Plater, LMNOPI and many more

Savior Elmundo, close-up

savior el munco art close up <em>Brooklyn Is the Future</em> to Open This Evening at the Vazquez in Bushwick: N Carlos J, Chris Soria, Eelco, Marc Evan, Savior Elmundo, Ben Angotti, Rob Plater, LMNOPI and many more

Ben Angotti, close-up

Ben Angotti painting <em>Brooklyn Is the Future</em> to Open This Evening at the Vazquez in Bushwick: N Carlos J, Chris Soria, Eelco, Marc Evan, Savior Elmundo, Ben Angotti, Rob Plater, LMNOPI and many more

Rob Plater

Plater art <em>Brooklyn Is the Future</em> to Open This Evening at the Vazquez in Bushwick: N Carlos J, Chris Soria, Eelco, Marc Evan, Savior Elmundo, Ben Angotti, Rob Plater, LMNOPI and many more

The two-weekend long exhibit and charity event opens this evening at 6pm.

Brooklyn <em>Brooklyn Is the Future</em> to Open This Evening at the Vazquez in Bushwick: N Carlos J, Chris Soria, Eelco, Marc Evan, Savior Elmundo, Ben Angotti, Rob Plater, LMNOPI and many more

Photos by Lois Stavsky; the first photo features LMNOPI

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This is the twelfth in a series of occasional posts featuring the diverse range of trucks and vans that strike our streets.

Cern

cern art on NYC truck NYC’s Stylish Trucks & Vans – from the Whimsical to the Wild, Part XII: Cern, CashRFC, Keely, Cone, YNN, NME, Frank Ape and more

Cash RFC

Cash rfc graffiti on truck NYC’s Stylish Trucks & Vans – from the Whimsical to the Wild, Part XII: Cern, CashRFC, Keely, Cone, YNN, NME, Frank Ape and more

Keely, Deeker… 

Keely and Deeker art on van NYC NYC’s Stylish Trucks & Vans – from the Whimsical to the Wild, Part XII: Cern, CashRFC, Keely, Cone, YNN, NME, Frank Ape and more

Cone

cone graffiti truck nyc NYC’s Stylish Trucks & Vans – from the Whimsical to the Wild, Part XII: Cern, CashRFC, Keely, Cone, YNN, NME, Frank Ape and more

YNN

ynn graffiti truck nyc NYC’s Stylish Trucks & Vans – from the Whimsical to the Wild, Part XII: Cern, CashRFC, Keely, Cone, YNN, NME, Frank Ape and more

NME

nme art truck nyc  NYC’s Stylish Trucks & Vans – from the Whimsical to the Wild, Part XII: Cern, CashRFC, Keely, Cone, YNN, NME, Frank Ape and more

Frank Ape

frank ape art truck NYC’s Stylish Trucks & Vans – from the Whimsical to the Wild, Part XII: Cern, CashRFC, Keely, Cone, YNN, NME, Frank Ape and more

Photo Credits: 1 Tara Murray; 2, 3, 6 & 7 Dani Reyes Mozeson; 4 Lois Stavsky; 5 Houda Lazrak

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Fusing elements of graffiti, painting, drawing and graphic design, N Carlos J creates masterful, atmospheric works both on and off the streets. He is particularly interested in the unconscious as it reflects our inmost emotions. We recently met up with the Brooklyn-based artist and had the opportunity to speak to him.

N Carlos J Untitled enamel and acrylic on canvas Speaking with Brooklyn Based Artist N Carlos J

You have quite a presence in Bushwick and beyond these days — painting murals, organizing projects and now curating. Can you tell us something about your background?

I attended Art & Design in the 80’s, and I was around graff heads all the time back then. Like just about everyone else there, I got up when I could.

Do any early graffiti-related memories stand out?

The first time I tried to spray my name, I ended up covering my entire hand with Krylon paint. It was impossible for me to wash it off, and I knew I had better before my mother would see it.

I suppose your mom wasn’t too happy about what you were doing!

She wasn’t. She thought I was crazy!

N Carlos J mural Brooklyn Speaking with Brooklyn Based Artist N Carlos J

Did you continue to study art in a formal setting?

Yes. I attended F.I.T., where I earned a Bachelors Degree in Fine Arts.  But soon after, I took a 15-year break from art.

Why was that?

I was married, and I felt pressured to earn money.

But these days you are back into it.

Yes, 100% of my time now is devoted to art.  When I’m not doing my own art, I am organizing projects, working on commissions or teaching art. And I am busy now curating an exhibit to open next Friday.

N Carlos J panel  Speaking with Brooklyn Based Artist N Carlos J

Now that art is playing such a central role in your life, do you feel that your formal art education was worthwhile?

Absolutely. It taught me discipline, and it helped me master technique and color theory.

Any thoughts on the graffiti/ street art divide?

I feel that they must coexist. It is a conversation that we must have.

What do you see as the future of street art?

Street artists are going to continue to treat themselves more like businessmen.

N carlos J Bushwick progress Speaking with Brooklyn Based Artist N Carlos J

N Carlos J at work Speaking with Brooklyn Based Artist N Carlos J

Yes, I can see that happening. But that’s a whole other conversation! How do you feel about the movement of graffiti and street art into galleries?

I love it!

Have you shown in galleries?

I’ve participated in many group shows and I’m working on two solo exhibitions for fall, 2015.

What about the corporate world’s engagement with graffiti and street art? How do you feel about that?

If it pays well enough, I have no problem with it.

N Carlos J street art NYC Speaking with Brooklyn Based Artist N Carlos J

What about the role of the Internet in this scene?

It is a blessing and a curse.  It gives us exposure, and that is, of course, a good thing. But it makes it too easy for others to steal styles and ideas from us.

How would you describe your ideal working environment?

Painting outside on a summer day with hip-hop music blasting.

What inspires you these days?

Listening to music by Kendrick Lamar or CyHi the Prynce inspires me. And reading excerpts from books like A Tale of Two Cities or The House of Rothschild gets me in the right space.

N carlos J shutter street art NYC Speaking with Brooklyn Based Artist N Carlos J

Are there any particular cultures that you feel have influenced your aesthetic?

American pop culture, but Renaissance and post-impressionist painting have also influenced me.

What about artists? Who are some of your favorite artists?

Among those I particularly love are: Borondo, Connor Harrington and Alexis Diaz

Do you work with a sketch in your hand or do you let it flow?

Sometimes I work with a sketch, and sometimes I don’t.

N Carlos J street art Bushwick NYC Speaking with Brooklyn Based Artist N Carlos J

Are you generally satisfied with your work?

No! I am a perfectionist.

How has your work evolved in the past few years?

I tend to more freely fuse figurative and expressionistic elements.

What do you see as the role of the artist in society?

The artist is the keeper of the flame. We are what moves this planet.

Brooklyn is the future exhibit Speaking with Brooklyn Based Artist N Carlos J

What’s ahead?

I’m currently curating, Brooklyn is the Future, a huge, two-weekend long exhibit and charity event to open next Friday, April 17, at the Vazquez at 93 Forrest Street in Bushwick.  Among the three dozen participating artists are: Damien Mitchell, Eelco, Ghost, Li-Hill, Mr. Prvrt, Rocko and Rubin. The artists are asked to envision the future of Brooklyn metaphorically or literally.  I am also curating a show called Good Times Bushwick for Bushwick Open Studios opening on Friday, June 5 at Express Yourself Barista. It will include a gallery show, outdoor murals, along with a day party and a barbecue.

Wow! It sounds great! Good luck with it all!

Interview by Lois Stavsky with Houda Lazrak

Photos: 1 and 3 (close-up of panel for Brooklyn is the Future) courtesy of the artist; 2, 7 & 8 Lois Stavsky; 4 & 5 Dani Reyes Mozeson and 6 Tara Murray

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keith haring close up untitled 1984 <em>Keith Haring: Heaven and Hell</em> at Skarstedt in Chelsea through April 18

Unlike so many of Keith Haring‘s playfully iconic works that exude a child-like innocence, the huge works on exhibit in Heaven and Hell largely suggest an eerie darkness and unfettered eroticism. Here’s a sampling:

Wide view of two untitled works, 1984

keith haring <em>Keith Haring: Heaven and Hell</em> at Skarstedt in Chelsea through April 18

Untitled, 1985

Keith haring Untitled 1985 <em>Keith Haring: Heaven and Hell</em> at Skarstedt in Chelsea through April 18

Untitled, 1984

keith haring untitled artwork 1984 <em>Keith Haring: Heaven and Hell</em> at Skarstedt in Chelsea through April 18

Untitled, 1984

Keith Haring art <em>Keith Haring: Heaven and Hell</em> at Skarstedt in Chelsea through April 18

Heaven and Hell remains on exhibit at Skarstedt at 550 West 21 Street through next Saturday.

Photos of images: 1, 4 and 5 City-as-School intern Zachariah Messaoud; 2 and 3 Dani Reyes Mozeson. Note: First photo is a close-up from the huge mural below it (R).

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In an eclectic range of visual styles and themes, music makes it way to NYC walls. Here  is a small sampling:

Zeso, close-up from huge mural in Bushwick

zeso close up Silent Music on NYC Streets: Zeso, Andre Trenier, Kingbee, Pose2, Chemis, Meres, Slone, See TF, Shiro, Manny Vega, Sonni and more

Andre Trenier, lead artist, in the Bronx

andre collaborative Silent Music on NYC Streets: Zeso, Andre Trenier, Kingbee, Pose2, Chemis, Meres, Slone, See TF, Shiro, Manny Vega, Sonni and more

 Kingbee, Pose2 and Chemis in East Harlem

kingbee pose2 chemis harlem street art Silent Music on NYC Streets: Zeso, Andre Trenier, Kingbee, Pose2, Chemis, Meres, Slone, See TF, Shiro, Manny Vega, Sonni and more

MeresSloneSee TFShiroIZK and more in Bushwick

hip hop street art bk Silent Music on NYC Streets: Zeso, Andre Trenier, Kingbee, Pose2, Chemis, Meres, Slone, See TF, Shiro, Manny Vega, Sonni and more

Close-up

meres and slone street art nyc Silent Music on NYC Streets: Zeso, Andre Trenier, Kingbee, Pose2, Chemis, Meres, Slone, See TF, Shiro, Manny Vega, Sonni and more

Manny Vega in East Harlem

Manny Vega street art portraits NYC Silent Music on NYC Streets: Zeso, Andre Trenier, Kingbee, Pose2, Chemis, Meres, Slone, See TF, Shiro, Manny Vega, Sonni and more

Sonni in Bushwick

Sonni street art NYC  Silent Music on NYC Streets: Zeso, Andre Trenier, Kingbee, Pose2, Chemis, Meres, Slone, See TF, Shiro, Manny Vega, Sonni and more

Mike Brown on the Lower East Side

Mike Brown street art nyc Silent Music on NYC Streets: Zeso, Andre Trenier, Kingbee, Pose2, Chemis, Meres, Slone, See TF, Shiro, Manny Vega, Sonni and more

Unidentified artist in Bedford-Stuyvesant

unidentified bed stuy nyc Silent Music on NYC Streets: Zeso, Andre Trenier, Kingbee, Pose2, Chemis, Meres, Slone, See TF, Shiro, Manny Vega, Sonni and more

Photo credits: 1, 2, 5 – 9 Lois Stavsky; 3 Dani Reyes Mozeson; 4 Tara Murray

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Argentine artist Magdalena Marcenaro aka Magda Love shares with us some of her early experiences and impressions of NYC in this second in our series of interviews with artists born abroad who have made NYC home.

Magda Love street art Brooklyn NYC Magda Love: From Buenos Aires to Brooklyn

When did you first visit New York City?

I first came here in 2000 with a bag and $300. My uncle had paid for my ticket.

What was your initial impression of this city?

I wasn’t impressed! I was raised in Buenos Aires, a similarly large city. And large cities don’t move me that much. I’m far more impressed by nature.  And I always thought of Europe as far cooler than the United States, as Europeans seem to value culture more than Americans do. London seemed like the ideal place to live because I was into fashion at the time.

Magda Love street art NYC close up Magda Love: From Buenos Aires to Brooklyn

Why, then, did you decide to stay in NYC?

Just about everyone was telling me that NYC is the place to be, and then four months later, I was married.

How did your family feel about your move?

My mother was very supportive. She raised me to be independent. She, herself, is very adventurous.

Magda Love art exhibit Magda Love: From Buenos Aires to Brooklyn

What were some of the challenges you faced when you first came here –before you were married?

My biggest challenge was finding a place to live.  When I first arrived, I called a friend I’d met in Argentina and I spent my first two weeks in her place on Roosevelt Island. There was a huge snowstorm at the time. I can’t forget that! I had never seen snow in Buenos Aires. I then worked in a hostel on 106th Street and Central Park West in exchange for a place to sleep. After that, I just crashed in lots of different spaces, wherever anyone had a spare bed.

That must have been difficult.

Yes, I remember spending an entire night on a computer in Times Square checking for possible rentals.  For a while I ended up renting a room in Alphabet City. It was in the Projects on Avenue D. I didn’t even know what the Projects were. And there I was — walking around in a fur coat! And as my Spanish is so different from that of the people living in the Projects, I could barely communicate with anyone. And, of course, dealing with paper work that any newcomer to the US has to deal with is always a challenge.

magda love art at welling court Magda Love: From Buenos Aires to Brooklyn

How did you meet your basic expenses early on?

I first worked in a coffee shop, and then I worked as a bartender. I also sold some clothes I’d made to Patricia Field. Back in Buenos Aires, I designed fashion.

Have you encountered any prejudice here?

Not here in NYC. Living in this city is like living in a bubble. But when I’m with my son  – who is biracial – outside of NYC, I do feel prejudice.

Magda Love Cobble Hill street art NYC Magda Love: From Buenos Aires to Brooklyn

How has your artwork evolved or changed since you moved here?

It changes all the time. I feel that I’ve grown tremendously. Being around so many talented artists – especially those who paint on the streets  – exposed me to so much. It has helped me develop different techniques.

Have New Yorkers been receptive to your artwork?

Yes. I’ve been fortunate.

Magda love close up collate at Nu Hotel NYC Magda Love: From Buenos Aires to Brooklyn

What would you like to accomplish here?

I’m eager to paint a huge wall. I want to collaborate with some of my favorite artists. And I’d love to have a solo show. Actually, my goal is to conquer the world!

What do you miss most about your native country?

I miss seeing my brother’s kids grow up and I miss the countryside.

Magda sneaker art Magda Love: From Buenos Aires to Brooklyn

Do you see yourself living here on a permanent basis or returning to your country?

I’m here to stay!

Interview conducted by Lois Stavsky and City-as-School intern Zachariah Messaoud; photo credits: 1, 2, 5 & 7 Zachariah Messaoud; 3 Dani Reyes Mozeson; 4 Tara Murray & 6 Lois Stavsky

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RAE This May Come as a Shock RAE on the Loss and Retrieval of his Trunk in <em>Trunk Work</em>

On exhibit through April 19 at 34 1/2 Bayard Street in Manhattan’s Chinatown, RAE’s brilliantly idiocyncratic Trunk Work celebrates the retrieval and contents of RAE‘s trunk from his former Brooklyn studio, while chronicling the events related to its loss and rescue. Graphically and conceptually engaging, Trunk Work wittily defines the mood and culture of the Brooklyn environs that housed RAE‘s trunk, as it showcases a range of RAE’s rescued and new works.

For four years, you couldn’t gain access to your trunk. What exactly was inside it?

Various artworks, notebooks, sketches, implements and a range of personal items.

rae close up RAE on the Loss and Retrieval of his Trunk in <em>Trunk Work</em>

How did you lose access to it?

I had been maintaining a studio in a Flatlands, Brooklyn apartment building. But as a result of tenant complaints, I was forcibly removed. Barred from entering the building, I had no way to retrieve my trunk.

rae neighbor note RAE on the Loss and Retrieval of his Trunk in <em>Trunk Work</em>

rae audio system RAE on the Loss and Retrieval of his Trunk in <em>Trunk Work</em>

What kinds of complaints might these tenants have had?

They didn’t like my taste in music; they complained that it was too loud. And the noise from my art practice bothered some. Finally, when a microwave I was using to melt some materials exploded, the landlord decided that he’d had enough of me.

RAE found objects RAE on the Loss and Retrieval of his Trunk in <em>Trunk Work</em>

How did you finally retrieve your trunk?

This past August, cracks were discovered in the building’s facade and the entire building was evacuated. Amidst the chaos of it all, I was able to retrieve my trunk from what was once my studio.

We’re so glad you did! What a story! And what an amazing recreation of it all!

In true RAE fashion, Trunk Work is far more than an art exhibit; it is a totally immersive experience. Set in a Chinatown basement at 94 1/2 Bayard Street, right off Mulberry, it continues through April 19, Thursday-Sunday (except for Easter) from 1-6pm.

Photos 1-3 and 5 by Lois Stavsky; 4 by Dani Reyes Mozeson

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frank lexi Bella Kosbe the best of the worst Street Art Prankster Hanksy Brings <em>The Best of the Worst</em> to NYC: Frank Ape, Lexi Bella, Cosbe, Miss Zukie, CB23, Magda Love, Meres, Russell King, Col, UR New York, Mr. Toll, El Sol 25 and much more

The following guest post is by Houda Lazrak, a graduate student in Museum Studies at New York University.  

This past weekend, Hanksy’s much-anticipated show, The Best of the Worst, drew hundreds of street art fans to the former Chase Bank at 104 Delancey Street on Manhattan’s Lower East Side. Along with some of NYC’s most notable graffiti writers and street artists, Hanksy transformed the space into a NYC playground-like arena — with a skate ramp, a Chinese massage parlor and more wonderfully-engaging site-specific installations. Dozens of intriguing, overlapping pieces, paste-ups and stickers paid homage to street art, while, also, poking fun at the scene.

Miss Zukie

Miss Zukie  Street Art Prankster Hanksy Brings <em>The Best of the Worst</em> to NYC: Frank Ape, Lexi Bella, Cosbe, Miss Zukie, CB23, Magda Love, Meres, Russell King, Col, UR New York, Mr. Toll, El Sol 25 and much more

CB23 

CB23 Street Art Prankster Hanksy Brings <em>The Best of the Worst</em> to NYC: Frank Ape, Lexi Bella, Cosbe, Miss Zukie, CB23, Magda Love, Meres, Russell King, Col, UR New York, Mr. Toll, El Sol 25 and much more

Magda Love and Hanksy and more

Magda Love Street Art Prankster Hanksy Brings <em>The Best of the Worst</em> to NYC: Frank Ape, Lexi Bella, Cosbe, Miss Zukie, CB23, Magda Love, Meres, Russell King, Col, UR New York, Mr. Toll, El Sol 25 and much more

Meres and more

Meres the best of the worst Street Art Prankster Hanksy Brings <em>The Best of the Worst</em> to NYC: Frank Ape, Lexi Bella, Cosbe, Miss Zukie, CB23, Magda Love, Meres, Russell King, Col, UR New York, Mr. Toll, El Sol 25 and much more

Russell King, Col and UR New York

Russell King more Street Art Prankster Hanksy Brings <em>The Best of the Worst</em> to NYC: Frank Ape, Lexi Bella, Cosbe, Miss Zukie, CB23, Magda Love, Meres, Russell King, Col, UR New York, Mr. Toll, El Sol 25 and much more

Hanksy

Hanksy the best of the worst Street Art Prankster Hanksy Brings <em>The Best of the Worst</em> to NYC: Frank Ape, Lexi Bella, Cosbe, Miss Zukie, CB23, Magda Love, Meres, Russell King, Col, UR New York, Mr. Toll, El Sol 25 and much more

Included, too, was a rather formally installed art exhibit in the wittily-titled Gag-Osian Gallery featuring some of NYC’s most popular street artists.

Mr. Toll at the Gag-Osian

Mr toll Street Art Prankster Hanksy Brings <em>The Best of the Worst</em> to NYC: Frank Ape, Lexi Bella, Cosbe, Miss Zukie, CB23, Magda Love, Meres, Russell King, Col, UR New York, Mr. Toll, El Sol 25 and much more

El Sol 25 at the Gag-Osian

El Sol25 Street Art Prankster Hanksy Brings <em>The Best of the Worst</em> to NYC: Frank Ape, Lexi Bella, Cosbe, Miss Zukie, CB23, Magda Love, Meres, Russell King, Col, UR New York, Mr. Toll, El Sol 25 and much more

All photos by Houda Lazrak; pictured in the first photo are Frank Ape, Lexi Bella and Cosbe

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This is the ninth in a series of occasional posts featuring the range of faces that surface on NYC open spaces:

James Bullough at the Bushwick Collective

James Bullough street art Bushwick Collective NYC Faces in NYC Public Spaces, Part IX: James Bullough, Alan Aine, Vexta, Zimad, Anser, Sam Kirk and Rafael de los Santos

Alan Aine in Bedford-Stuyvesant

alan aine street art bed stuy Faces in NYC Public Spaces, Part IX: James Bullough, Alan Aine, Vexta, Zimad, Anser, Sam Kirk and Rafael de los Santos

Vexta in the East Village

vexta east village street art nyc Faces in NYC Public Spaces, Part IX: James Bullough, Alan Aine, Vexta, Zimad, Anser, Sam Kirk and Rafael de los Santos

Zimad at the Bushwick Collective

zimad street art nyc Faces in NYC Public Spaces, Part IX: James Bullough, Alan Aine, Vexta, Zimad, Anser, Sam Kirk and Rafael de los Santos

Anser in Bushwick

anser street art bushwick nyc Faces in NYC Public Spaces, Part IX: James Bullough, Alan Aine, Vexta, Zimad, Anser, Sam Kirk and Rafael de los Santos

Sam Kirk in Williamsburg

provoke culture street art nyc Faces in NYC Public Spaces, Part IX: James Bullough, Alan Aine, Vexta, Zimad, Anser, Sam Kirk and Rafael de los Santos

Rafael de los Santos aka Poteleche in Williamsburg

HD Crew Street art nyc Faces in NYC Public Spaces, Part IX: James Bullough, Alan Aine, Vexta, Zimad, Anser, Sam Kirk and Rafael de los Santos

Photo credits: 1 & 3. Tara Murray; 2, 4, 6 & 7 Lois Stavsky; 5. Dani Reyes Mozeson

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