Exhibits

Keo xmen graffiti NYC Born in the Bronx:  A Visual Record of the Early Days of Hip Hop Continues through 7.26 at Gavin Brown’s Enterprise in the West Village

On exhibit through this week at Gavin Brown’s Enterprise in the West Village is Born in the Bronx: A Visual Record of the Early Days of Hip-Hop. Among its many highlights are: memorabilia featuring personal narratives and archives of hip-hop pioneer Afrika Bambaataa;  hip-hop party flyers and clothing designed by the late Buddy Esquire; original cells from the animated sequences of Charlie Ahearn’s film Wild Style and prints of Joe Conzo’s photographs of the early days of hip hop.

Here is a sampling of what greeted us when we visited this past Tuesday:

On the exterior of Gavin Brown’s Enterprise

Afrika Bambaataa Born in the Bronx NYC Born in the Bronx:  A Visual Record of the Early Days of Hip Hop Continues through 7.26 at Gavin Brown’s Enterprise in the West Village

U.K.- based Paul Insect‘s portrait of Afrika Bambaataa

Paul Insect street art NYC Born in the Bronx:  A Visual Record of the Early Days of Hip Hop Continues through 7.26 at Gavin Brown’s Enterprise in the West Village

And inside the gallery — noted DJ, producer and poet Rich Medina going though the bins of duplicates from Afrika Bambaataa‘s record collection

Rich Medina DJ Born in the Bronx:  A Visual Record of the Early Days of Hip Hop Continues through 7.26 at Gavin Brown’s Enterprise in the West Village

 Close-up from installation of Buddy Esquire‘s clothing and flyer designs

Buddy Esquire installation Born in the Bronx:  A Visual Record of the Early Days of Hip Hop Continues through 7.26 at Gavin Brown’s Enterprise in the West Village

Afrika Bambaataa fashioned from Bambaataa’s records by Paul Insect and Bäst

Bast recycled records Born in the Bronx:  A Visual Record of the Early Days of Hip Hop Continues through 7.26 at Gavin Brown’s Enterprise in the West Village

Selections from Joe Conzo’s’s seminal Born in the Bronx

Joe Conzo Photos Born in the Bronx Born in the Bronx:  A Visual Record of the Early Days of Hip Hop Continues through 7.26 at Gavin Brown’s Enterprise in the West Village

Joe Conzo and Charlie Ahearn

Joe Conzo Charlie Ahearn Born in the Bronx Born in the Bronx:  A Visual Record of the Early Days of Hip Hop Continues through 7.26 at Gavin Brown’s Enterprise in the West Village

The pioneering MC and hip-hop historian Grandmaster Caz

Grandmaster Caz Born in the Bronx Born in the Bronx:  A Visual Record of the Early Days of Hip Hop Continues through 7.26 at Gavin Brown’s Enterprise in the West Village

And legendary b-boy Crazy Legs

Crazy Legs Spinning Born in the Bronx:  A Visual Record of the Early Days of Hip Hop Continues through 7.26 at Gavin Brown’s Enterprise in the West Village

With Charlie Ahearn

Charlie ahearn and crazy legs Born in the Bronx:  A Visual Record of the Early Days of Hip Hop Continues through 7.26 at Gavin Brown’s Enterprise in the West Village

Exhibited by Boo-Hooray and curated by Johan Kugelberg, Born in the Bronx is an extraordinary tribute to hip-hop’s early days and its everlasting influence. And if you can get over there tomorrow (Tuesday) afternoon — between 1-3pm — you will be treated to a Born In The Bronx Hot Platter Lunch DJ Session with DJ Jazzy Jay and DJ Rockin Rob. The gallery is located at 620 Greenwich Street at the corner of Leroy Street in the Village.

Photos 1-4, 7, 8 & 10 by Lois Stavsky;  5, 6 & 9 by Dani Reyes Mozeson; photo 1 features mural by Keo X-men

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gallery nine5 will host a block party this evening — from 6-8pm — to celebrate the transformation of its gallery walls into a vibrant, magical public sphere. Here are a few recently captured images:

Vor138‘s completed piece with TATS CRU on the left and Bisco Smith to the right

Tats Cru andVor138 and Bisco Smith graffiti and street art gallery nine5 to Host Group Ink Block Party This Evening with Tats Cru, Vor138, Bisco Smith, Shiro, Ket and Rubin415

Vor138

Vor 138 graffiti gallery nine5 to Host Group Ink Block Party This Evening with Tats Cru, Vor138, Bisco Smith, Shiro, Ket and Rubin415

Shiro at work

Shiro paints gallery nine5 to Host Group Ink Block Party This Evening with Tats Cru, Vor138, Bisco Smith, Shiro, Ket and Rubin415

And her completed piece

Shiro graffiti characters Gallery Nine5 gallery nine5 to Host Group Ink Block Party This Evening with Tats Cru, Vor138, Bisco Smith, Shiro, Ket and Rubin415

Ket – who has been transforming his original piece with political references and names of victims of violence and war; it’s certain to look different this evening from the close-up captured here!

Ket political graffiti gallery nine5 to Host Group Ink Block Party This Evening with Tats Cru, Vor138, Bisco Smith, Shiro, Ket and Rubin415

And the always-wonderful Rubin415 at work on Monday

Rubin415 paints abstract graffiiti gallery nine5 to Host Group Ink Block Party This Evening with Tats Cru, Vor138, Bisco Smith, Shiro, Ket and Rubin415

gallery nine5 is located at 24 Spring Street, and if you can’t make it this evening, you can check out the site-specific exhibit through July 30.

group Ink gallery nine5 to Host Group Ink Block Party This Evening with Tats Cru, Vor138, Bisco Smith, Shiro, Ket and Rubin415

Photos: 1-4 by Dani Reyes Mozeson; 5-6 by Lois Stavsky

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Presented by No Longer Empty in partnership with Broadway Housing Communities, If You Build It features a range of artwork in different media by more than twenty local, national, and international artists. Located at 155th Street and St. Nicholas Avenue in Sugar Hill on a site designed by architect David Adjaye, the exhibit — along with an impressive array of events and programs – continues through August 10. Here is a sampling of the artworks that can be seen on the site’s grounds and in future apartments:

Rául Ayala, A Blaze of Glory

Raul Ayala mural no longer empty No Longer Empty Brings If You Build It to Sugar Hill, Harlem with Rául Ayala, Moses Ros Suárez, Carlos Mare, Radcliffe Bailey, Scherezade García, Brendan Jamison & Mark Revels and more

Moses Ros-Suárezseated on sculpture he fashioned — one of four structural models of bridges

Moses Ros Suarez No Longer Empty Brings If You Build It to Sugar Hill, Harlem with Rául Ayala, Moses Ros Suárez, Carlos Mare, Radcliffe Bailey, Scherezade García, Brendan Jamison & Mark Revels and more

Carlos Mare aka Mare1398th FreeStyle Archityper

Carlos Mare graffiti sculpture if you build it1 No Longer Empty Brings If You Build It to Sugar Hill, Harlem with Rául Ayala, Moses Ros Suárez, Carlos Mare, Radcliffe Bailey, Scherezade García, Brendan Jamison & Mark Revels and more

 Radcliffe Bailey, From the Cabinet: Fire Music — fashioned with recycled piano keys

Radcliffe Bailey storm at Sea installation No Longer Empty If You Build It No Longer Empty Brings If You Build It to Sugar Hill, Harlem with Rául Ayala, Moses Ros Suárez, Carlos Mare, Radcliffe Bailey, Scherezade García, Brendan Jamison & Mark Revels and more

Scherezade GarcíaCathedral/Catedral, made up of stacked inner tubes/life savers ‘dipped’ in gold paint “so as to resemble a temporary alter or monument to immigrants and their aspirations”

Scherezade Garcia art inatallation No Longer Empty No Longer Empty Brings If You Build It to Sugar Hill, Harlem with Rául Ayala, Moses Ros Suárez, Carlos Mare, Radcliffe Bailey, Scherezade García, Brendan Jamison & Mark Revels and more

Brendan Jamison and Mark Revels, Sugar Metropolis – composed with half a million sugar cubes

Brendan Jamison Mark Revels Sugar Metropolis No Longer Empty Brings If You Build It to Sugar Hill, Harlem with Rául Ayala, Moses Ros Suárez, Carlos Mare, Radcliffe Bailey, Scherezade García, Brendan Jamison & Mark Revels and more

The exhibit is open Thursday–Friday 3–7pm & Saturday–Sunday 1–6pm & Wednesday by appointment. 

Photo of Rául Ayala by Lois Stavsky; all others by Dani Reyes Mozeson

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BR1 street art Italian Cultural Institute NYC FROM STREET TO ART Continues through August 20 at Italian Cultural Insititue with BR1, Sten&Lex, Agostino Iacurci, 2501, DEM, UFO5 & more

FROM STREET TO ART, featuring a range of artwork by 10 contemporary Italian artists who’ve achieved recognition for their street art, continues through August 20. Curated by Simone Pallotta, the exhibit is housed in the elegant Italian Cultural Insititue on Manhattan’s Upper East Side and is open to the public Monday through Friday from 10 – 4pm. Here is a sampling of the artwork that ranges from the imaginatively provocative to the wistfully lyrical:

BR1, Holy Land Delights, close-up

BR1 Holy Land Delights close up FROM STREET TO ART Continues through August 20 at Italian Cultural Insititue with BR1, Sten&Lex, Agostino Iacurci, 2501, DEM, UFO5 & more

Sten&Lex, Untitled

Lex Sten Italian art Italian CulturalInstitute NYC FROM STREET TO ART Continues through August 20 at Italian Cultural Insititue with BR1, Sten&Lex, Agostino Iacurci, 2501, DEM, UFO5 & more

Agostino Iacurci, Mimicry

Agostino Iacurci at Italian Cultural Institute FROM STREET TO ART Continues through August 20 at Italian Cultural Insititue with BR1, Sten&Lex, Agostino Iacurci, 2501, DEM, UFO5 & more

2501, Rising of the Phoenix

2501 art Italian Cultural Insitutute edited 1 FROM STREET TO ART Continues through August 20 at Italian Cultural Insititue with BR1, Sten&Lex, Agostino Iacurci, 2501, DEM, UFO5 & more

Dem, close-up

Dem ink on paper Italian cultural institute FROM STREET TO ART Continues through August 20 at Italian Cultural Insititue with BR1, Sten&Lex, Agostino Iacurci, 2501, DEM, UFO5 & more

UFO5,  Untitled

UFO5 at Italian Cultuiral Institute NYC FROM STREET TO ART Continues through August 20 at Italian Cultural Insititue with BR1, Sten&Lex, Agostino Iacurci, 2501, DEM, UFO5 & more

Photos of BR1, Sten Lex, Augustino Iacurci and UFO5 by Dani Reyes Mozeson; of BR1 close-up, 2501 and Dem by Lois Stavsky

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Speaking with Yes One

July 9, 2014

Bronx native Yes One has been gracing walls, canvases and more with his energetic aesthetic — in NYC and beyond — for almost 30 years. StreetArtNYC is delighted to feature an interview with him.

Yes one graffiti Bronx NYC Speaking with Yes One

How did you first get into graffiti? What inspired you?

I was introduced to graffiti by Smiley 149 of the Ebony Dukes when I was 10 years old. He used to chill outside my favorite candy shop where I played Asteroids on the arcades. He sat on a crate right outside, and we would vibe watching the trains go by on the Tremont El. This was about 1979.

When you began writing, what kind of surfaces did you hit?

Illegal ones — because of the rush. I can’t explain it, but it’s like robbing a bank.

How did your family feel about what you were doing back then?

My mom and dad hated it. They saw it as a crime. My mother was scared. She used to say, “Te voy a botar esas latas!” (I’m going to throw your cans out!)  She actually kept some of those cans, and I have some collectables today.

yes One abstract graffiti on canvas Speaking with Yes One

Have you painted with any crews?

Yes! I’ve painted with BT, 4Burners, GAK, and FX – among others.

Do you prefer working alone or would you rather collaborate with other artists?

I often work alone, but I’m open to collaborating with anyone.

Who are some of the artists with whom you’ve painted?

Dero, Pase, PerOne, Logek, Beasto, Tone MST, Ribs GAK and Shiro  —  to name a few.

Yes1 graffiti Bushwick Speaking with Yes One

Any thoughts on the graffiti/ street art divide?

I see them as two different things. Graffiti is letters, forms and styles. Street art doesn’t pay homage to graffiti, but I can admire it.

How do you feel about the movement of graffiti and street art into galleries?

I think it’s great! I had works featured in a number of exhibits including Cause and Effect and Board of Art and at the Bronx Museum of the Arts.

What about the role of the Internet in this scene? Do you follow any sites?

I follow 12ozProphet and FreshPaint. The Internet is a great networking and marketing tool. It is how I’m able to sell canvases overseas.

And the photographers in this scene? How do you feel about them?

They don’t bother me. They have learned the etiquette.

Yes One abstract graffiti on canvas close up Speaking with Yes One

Do you have a formal arts education?

I never went to art school.

What’s the riskiest thing you’ve done?  And why were you willing to take that risk?

Painting in the 2 and 5 train yards in the Bronx with Clark in the late 80s. I was young, and you do foolish things when you’re young.

How would you describe your ideal working environment?

My ideal working environment is the Ya Tu Sabe studio space.

What inspires you these days?

Seeing people checking out my walls, taking pictures and smiling. When I see people appreciating my work, I feel I did my job.

Yes One Black Book graffiti wild style Speaking with Yes One

Are there any particular cultures you feel influenced your aesthetic?

I influence myself.

Do you work with a sketch in your hand or do you let it flow?

I work with a sketch in my hand, but what goes on the wall is not always a hundred percent what was on the paper.

Are you generally satisfied with your work?

I’m never satisfied. I may “finish” a wall this week and go back the next saying to myself, “I could have added this or that.”

How do you feel when you look back at the work you did two years ago?

I take it as a good reference point for picking up new techniques and elevating my style. I feel that my work has gotten stronger. And I feel a hunger to produce more and further my talents.

Shiro Yes One Part One graffiti5Pointz Long island City NYC Speaking with Yes One

What percentage of your day is devoted to your art? I know you have a “day job.”

I’d say about 75 percent. It’s work – then, art. I wake up at 5 in the morning and don’t go to sleep until 2 a.m.

What are some of your other interests?

I love baseball and collecting rare items. I also love BMX bikes.

What do you see as the role of the artist in society?

The role of the artist is a big one. The artist is there to affect a person’s mind by introducing new ideas and concepts.

Interview conducted by Lenny Collado and edited by Lois Stavsky; photos 1, 2, 4 & 5  Lois Stavsky; 3 & 6 Dani Reyes Mozeson; photo 5 is from Yes One’s black book; photos 2 & 4 (close-up) are from works currently on exhibit at the Pop Bar in Astoria, Queens; photo 6 is a collab with Shiro, Part and Meres at 5Pointz 

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BG183 graffiti character group ink gallery nine5 TATS CRU, KET and Bisco Smith Begin SoHo Based gallery nine5s Transformation in GROUP INK

The transformation of SoHo-based gallery nine5’s walls from “a private space into a public sphere” has begun with expressive murals — from the playful to the political —  by TATS CRU, Ket and Bisco Smith.  Here’s a sampling of what’s been happening:

TATS CRU‘s BG183 at work to the right of Bio and Nicer

BG183 paints Gallerynine5 TATS CRU, KET and Bisco Smith Begin SoHo Based gallery nine5s Transformation in GROUP INK

BG183 tats cru gallery nine5 TATS CRU, KET and Bisco Smith Begin SoHo Based gallery nine5s Transformation in GROUP INK

Tats Cru gallery nine5 group ink TATS CRU, KET and Bisco Smith Begin SoHo Based gallery nine5s Transformation in GROUP INK

Ket installs dozens of newspaper articles illustrating human sufferings, largely the result of wars

Ket installs for Group Ink TATS CRU, KET and Bisco Smith Begin SoHo Based gallery nine5s Transformation in GROUP INK

And paints over them 

Alan Ket installation gallerynine5 TATS CRU, KET and Bisco Smith Begin SoHo Based gallery nine5s Transformation in GROUP INK

With quote from historian and social activist Howard Zinn

Ket installation Howard Zinn Gallery nine5 TATS CRU, KET and Bisco Smith Begin SoHo Based gallery nine5s Transformation in GROUP INK

And Bisco Smith – in from the West Coast — graces the wall with his distinct aesthetic 

Bisco Smith installation close up gallerynine5 TATS CRU, KET and Bisco Smith Begin SoHo Based gallery nine5s Transformation in GROUP INK

Bisco Smith mural gallery nine5 TATS CRU, KET and Bisco Smith Begin SoHo Based gallery nine5s Transformation in GROUP INK

The public is invited to observe, explore and join the conversation as Vor138, Shiro and Rubin415 contribute to the further transitory makeover of gallery nine5. Keep posted to StreetArtNYC for updates and, if you are in town, be sure to check out the opening reception on July 17, 6-8pm. gallery nine5 is located at 24 Spring Street in SoHo.

Action photos by Dani Reyes Mozeson; others by Lois Stavsky

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Marka27 Marka27, Don Rimx and Ian Kuali`i in TR3SPASS at the Dumbo Spot

Both on the streets and in their studios, Marka27, Don Rimx & Ian Kuali`i fashion extraordinarily rich tantalizing images. An intriguing selection of their largely character-driven mixed-media paintings, prints and more were presented by M27 Designs in the remarkable one-night pop-up exhibit TR3SPASS at the Dumbo Spot this past Friday evening. Here’s a small sampling:

Victor “Marka27″ Quiñonez

Marka27 character Marka27, Don Rimx and Ian Kuali`i in TR3SPASS at the Dumbo Spot

Marka27 artTrespass Marka27, Don Rimx and Ian Kuali`i in TR3SPASS at the Dumbo Spot

Ian Kuali`i

Ian in tresspass Marka27, Don Rimx and Ian Kuali`i in TR3SPASS at the Dumbo Spot

Ian Marka27, Don Rimx and Ian Kuali`i in TR3SPASS at the Dumbo Spot

David “Don Rimx” Sepulveda

Don Rimx character art Trespass Marka27, Don Rimx and Ian Kuali`i in TR3SPASS at the Dumbo Spot

Don Rimx character Trespass1 Marka27, Don Rimx and Ian Kuali`i in TR3SPASS at the Dumbo Spot

Photos of artwork by Sara C. Mozeson and Lois Stavsky

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boy kong street art character NYC Florida Based Boy Kong Brings His Playful Aesthetic to NYC Streets and to the Cotton Candy Machine

Orlando, Florida-based artist Boy Kong recently left his mark in NYC. His delightfully fanciful aesthetic has made its way to the exterior of rag & bone on Elizabeth Street in Manhattan and to the shutter at 175 Roebling Street in Williamsburg, Brooklyn. A selection of his distinctly crafted individual pieces can also be seen at Cotton Candy Machine, 235 South 1st Street in Williamsburg, through this week.

On Roebling Street in Williamsburg

Boy Kong street art Williamsburg NYC Florida Based Boy Kong Brings His Playful Aesthetic to NYC Streets and to the Cotton Candy Machine

And a sampling of what’s on view at at Cotton Candy Machine 

Boy Kong Cotton Candy artwork Florida Based Boy Kong Brings His Playful Aesthetic to NYC Streets and to the Cotton Candy Machine

Boy Kong at Cotton Candy Florida Based Boy Kong Brings His Playful Aesthetic to NYC Streets and to the Cotton Candy Machine

Boy Kong Art Cotton Candy Machine Florida Based Boy Kong Brings His Playful Aesthetic to NYC Streets and to the Cotton Candy Machine

Photos by Dani Reyes Mozeson 

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Opening tomorrow evening, June 20, at the Italian Cultural Institute of New York, 686 Park Avenue, is an exhibit of artwork by 10 of Italy’s best contemporary artists who, also, maintain a huge presence on the streets. Curated by Simone Pallotta, it is the first collective exhibit of work by Italian street artists here in NYC.

Here is a sampling of the art on the streets:

BR1

BR1 street art FROM STREET TO ART to Open Tomorrow, June 20, at Italian Cultural Institute of New York with BR1, Agostino Iacurci, Sten&Lex and more

Agostino Iacurci

Agostino Iacurci street art FROM STREET TO ART to Open Tomorrow, June 20, at Italian Cultural Institute of New York with BR1, Agostino Iacurci, Sten&Lex and more

Sten&Lex

StenLex street art FROM STREET TO ART to Open Tomorrow, June 20, at Italian Cultural Institute of New York with BR1, Agostino Iacurci, Sten&Lex and more

Dem

Dem street art  FROM STREET TO ART to Open Tomorrow, June 20, at Italian Cultural Institute of New York with BR1, Agostino Iacurci, Sten&Lex and more

From street to art FROM STREET TO ART to Open Tomorrow, June 20, at Italian Cultural Institute of New York with BR1, Agostino Iacurci, Sten&Lex and more

Also featured are works by ArisCyop&KafEronHitnesUfo5 and 2501FROM STREET TO ART opens at 6pm tomorrow at 686 Park Avenue on Manhattan’s Upper East Side and continues through August 20, 2014.

All images courtesy Simone Pallotta

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Solus street art Bushwick Collective 2 Speaking with Dublin Based Street Artist Solus

Based in Dublin, Ireland, Solus returned earlier this month to the the Bushwick Collective to participate in its annual block party and to share his aesthetic vision with us.  We also had the opportunity to find out a bit about him:

When and where did you first get up?

About seven years ago I started doing illegal stencils around Dublin.

What inspired you at the time?

I was working at a job that I hated. I thought that’s what everyone does! But I knew that I needed to make a change in my life. I was on a very self-destructive path. And so I started creating stencil art and never stopped. Street art saved my life!

Were you influenced or inspired by any particular artists?

Maser was, probably, my biggest inspiration, along with Will St Leger. They were very prolific around Dublin at the time.

Solus street art saced my life Speaking with Dublin Based Street Artist Solus

Have you any preferred surfaces or spots?

Obviously flat surfaces are better in high-traffic spots.

How do you feel about the graffiti/street art divide?

I don’t think about it. It’s not relevant. I just do what I love.  But I’ve always been a huge fan of the TDA Klann, Ireland’s premier graffiti crew.

Your work has been exhibited in galleries world-wide and your new solo show is about to open in Montreal. Any thoughts about the movement of street art into galleries?

I think it is a good thing that it is being recognized as art and that people want to purchase it. I generally feel a little out of place at gallery shows because most of the time my clothes are covered in paint. I prefer being at the studio or tackling a wall.

solus stencil art on canvas Speaking with Dublin Based Street Artist Solus

Have you any other source of income these days?

I earn money from prints, canvases and commissions. I put all the money I make back into my artwork.

How do you feel about the increasing linkage between the street art world and the corporate world?

Only time will tell. It has become so mainstream that it may become oversaturated.

Why do you suppose graffiti is held in higher esteem in Europe than it is here in the States?

Probably because here in the U.S., it is associated with vandalism.

What inspires you these days?

The concept of a boy in a man’s world, punching above his weight and being victorious against all odds.

Solus street art Bushwick Collective NYC Speaking with Dublin Based Street Artist Solus

Are there any particular cultures that have influenced your aesthetics?

After visiting Korea, I did a series of works influenced by what I’d seen and experienced there.

Do you work with a sketch in hand or do you just let it flow?

I work with a sketch or a photo.

Are you generally satisfied with your work?

Increasingly so. But when I look back at what I did even one year ago, I feel I could have done better.

What percentage of your time is devoted to art?

100% of my time; it’s a 24/7 gig!

Solus with spraycan Speaking with Dublin Based Street Artist Solus

Any other interests?

Traveling. I’d love to paint everywhere!

Have you any favorite cities?

New York. There’s something in the air here. And it’s very competitive. I’d love to live here!

What do you see as the role of the artist in society?

It’s the most important role one can have! Art makes people feel good, and it makes people think!

Solus street art Bushwick Collective Brooklyn NYC Speaking with Dublin Based Street Artist Solus

Note: Solus’s solo exhibit UNDERDOG opens this Thursday, June 19, at the Clark Street Mercantile in Montreal, Canada.

Photo credits: 1, 4 & 6. Lois Stavsky; 2 & 3. Courtesy of the artist; 5. Dani Reyes Mozeson

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