Exhibits

Jily Ballistic and JPO art 17 Frost <em>SOLD Magazine</em> Launches with Exhibit at 17 Frost: Jily Ballistic with JPO, Chris RWK,  Raquel Echanique, Elle and Ramiro Davaro

SOLD Magazine launched this past Thursday evening with an exhibit — co-curated with Ellis Gallagher — and party at 17 Frost. When I stopped by early in the evening, I had the opportunity to speak to John Paul O’Grodnick, who — along with Greg Frederick and BD White – made it all happen.

 Just what is SOLD Magazine?

SOLD Magazine is a free magazine by artists for artists and art lovers. Among its features are: artists interviewing each other, studio visits, artist and photographer profiles, a travel section and much more.

What motivated you thee to launch it?

A sense that artists need a new platform for exposure. Our mission is to provide that platform.

chris rwk art 17 frost <em>SOLD Magazine</em> Launches with Exhibit at 17 Frost: Jily Ballistic with JPO, Chris RWK,  Raquel Echanique, Elle and Ramiro Davaro

 When did you guys first begin working on SOLD Magazine? And how did you fund it?

We began working on it at the beginning of October, and we funded it via a Kickstarter campaign.

It’s great that your campaign was so successful! What has been your greatest challenge in seeing this through?

Rounding up the artists whom we wanted to participate in our venture.

raquel echanique 17 Frost exhibit <em>SOLD Magazine</em> Launches with Exhibit at 17 Frost: Jily Ballistic with JPO, Chris RWK,  Raquel Echanique, Elle and Ramiro Davaro

 Was it an open call? How did you decide which artists to include?

No! It was artists we’ve known and worked with in the past. Some of them suggested others.

How often do you expect to publish SOLD Magazine?

Once every three months. It is intended as a quarterly.

elle art 17 Frost nyc <em>SOLD Magazine</em> Launches with Exhibit at 17 Frost: Jily Ballistic with JPO, Chris RWK,  Raquel Echanique, Elle and Ramiro Davaro

How will folks be able to get hold of it?

We plan to make it available in galleries and museums throughout the city, as well as in local businesses here in Williamsburg.

I notice that this premier issue focuses on female artists, with your first cover featuring Gilf and Elle. What can we expect in future issues?

Every issue will have a theme. Our next one will focus on collaborations.

Ramiro Davato art at 17 Frost <em>SOLD Magazine</em> Launches with Exhibit at 17 Frost: Jily Ballistic with JPO, Chris RWK,  Raquel Echanique, Elle and Ramiro Davaro

 That sounds great! Congratulations!

Note: The above images of are of works that were on exhibit and for sale at Thursday evening’s SOLD Magazine‘s launch:

1. Jily Ballistic and John Paul O’Grodnick aka JPO

2. Chris RWK

3. Raquel Echanique

4. Elle

5. Ramiro Davaro

Interview by Lois Stavsky and photos by Tara Murray

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Nick walker I love New York Quin Hotel Nick Walker at the Quin and on the Streets of Manhattan

Best-known for his sharply dressed, bowler-hatted vandal, the legendary British stencil artist Nick Walker — the  first ever artist-in-residence at the Quin Hotel – has returned!  Curated by DK Johnston, a series of Walker’s new artworks, along with his classic iconic stencil works, remain on view at the Quin through February 18th.  What follows are a few more images of his works on exhibit:

The vandal on 57th Street across from the Quin

Nick walker stencil art Quin Exhibit NYC Nick Walker at the Quin and on the Streets of Manhattan

The vandal gets busy

nick stencil on canvas Quin Hotel NYC Nick Walker at the Quin and on the Streets of Manhattan

The vandal leaves his mark on a pair of Louboutins

Nick walker stencil art Quin Hotel NYC Nick Walker at the Quin and on the Streets of Manhattan

And here are a few of his huge stencil works currently on the streets of Manhattan:

In Chelsea

nick walker stencil art chelsea NYC Nick Walker at the Quin and on the Streets of Manhattan

On the Upper East Side

Nick Walker Upper East Side 2 Nick Walker at the Quin and on the Streets of Manhattan

In Little Italy

Nick Walker Little Italy street art Nick Walker at the Quin and on the Streets of Manhattan

The Quin Hotel is located at 101 West 57th Street at Sixth Avenue.

Photos: 1 & 6 Lois Stavsky; 2 & 3 Sara Mozeson; 4 courtesy DK Johnston and 5 & 7 Tara Murray

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Esteban del Valle looking for sediment art on panel Esteban del Valle on Contemporary Colonialism: <em>Displacing Waves</em> to Open January 9 at Superchief Gallery LA

Brooklyn-based artist Esteban del Valle has been busy! The culmination of seven months of travels throughout the United States, Displacing Waves, his upcoming exhibit, reflects on the artist’s role as a member of the “creative class” that creates new settlements, while displacing others. Esteban’s distinctly adroit mixed-media approach — blurring the lines between drawing and painting — brilliantly captures the anxiety, along with the comical irony, that the threat of gentrification poses to various communities, including the gentrifiers themselves.  Here is a sampling of Esteban’s painterly musings on contemporary colonialism that will be on exhibit at LA’s' Superchief Gallery opening this coming Saturday.

Appetite, Acrylic ink and collage on panel, 9″ x 12″

Esteban del Valle appetite art on panel Esteban del Valle on Contemporary Colonialism: <em>Displacing Waves</em> to Open January 9 at Superchief Gallery LA

Cocktails near the poor man’s riviera, Acrylic and spray paint on canvas, 48″ x 60″

Esteban del Valle Esteban del Valle Cocktails near the poor mans riviera art on canvas Esteban del Valle on Contemporary Colonialism: <em>Displacing Waves</em> to Open January 9 at Superchief Gallery LA

We are running out of cities, Ink and collage on paper, 11″ x 8.5″

Esteban del Valle running out of cities ink and collage on paper Esteban del Valle on Contemporary Colonialism: <em>Displacing Waves</em> to Open January 9 at Superchief Gallery LA

And the artist at work at Superchief Gallery as he readies for his West Coat exhibit

Esteban del Valle process superchief LA Esteban del Valle on Contemporary Colonialism: <em>Displacing Waves</em> to Open January 9 at Superchief Gallery LA

Opening this coming Saturday, January 9, at Superchief Gallery, 739 Kohler Street, in Los Angeles, Displacing Waves remains on view through January 31.

Note: Opening image is Looking for sediment, Acrylic ink and collage on panel, 8″x 10″

All photos courtesy the artist

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Issam Kourbaj Another Day Lost Art Installation Syrian Artist Issam Kourbajs Installation <em>Another Day Lost</em> Continues through January 5 on the Grounds of Trinity Church in Lower Manhattan

Since 2011, over 10 million Syrians have been uprooted from their homes. Another Day Losta mixed-media installation by Syrian UK-based artist Issam Kourbaj, offers a powerful look into the crisis crippling his homeland.

Issam Kourbaj calligraphy Another Day Lost Syrian Artist Issam Kourbajs Installation <em>Another Day Lost</em> Continues through January 5 on the Grounds of Trinity Church in Lower Manhattan

Inspired by the aerial imagery of the refugee camps in the Jordanian desert, the artist fashioned his installation — reflecting on the lives of refugees living in tents — from waste materials, such as medicine packaging and discarded books.

Issam Kourbaj tent installation close up Syrian Artist Issam Kourbajs Installation <em>Another Day Lost</em> Continues through January 5 on the Grounds of Trinity Church in Lower Manhattan

Each day of the installation, another match is lit and then blown out to mark one more day of Syria’s devastation.

Issam Kourbaj matches installation Syrian Artist Issam Kourbajs Installation <em>Another Day Lost</em> Continues through January 5 on the Grounds of Trinity Church in Lower Manhattan

U.S. residents visiting the site are invited to compose and electronically submit a letter to their elected representatives encouraging them to support increasing the number of Syrian refugees admitted to the U.S.

Issam Kourbaj Syrian Artist Issam Kourbajs Installation <em>Another Day Lost</em> Continues through January 5 on the Grounds of Trinity Church in Lower Manhattan

On the grounds of Trinity Church — at the intersection of Broadway and Wall Street in Lower Manhattan – Another Day Lost can be viewed through January 5th.

Note: This post was written in collaboration with Kristin L. Wolfe.

Photo credits: 1, 3 & 4 Dani Reyes Mozeson; 2 & 5 Kristin L. Wolfe

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rocko the art of peace Lady K Fever Curates <em>The Art of Peace</em> at Al Iman Community Center with Rocko, BG183, Meres, Chris Riggs, Scratch, Lexi Bella and more

Curated by Lady K Fever and hosted by Aldo Perez, Ihe Art of Peace, an exhibit of mural and graffiti art celebrating peace, opens tonight at the Al Iman Community Center. I had the opportunity to speak to Lady K Fever while visiting the space at 2006 Westchester Avenue earlier this week.

BG 183 the art of piece mural art Lady K Fever Curates <em>The Art of Peace</em> at Al Iman Community Center with Rocko, BG183, Meres, Chris Riggs, Scratch, Lexi Bella and more

Can you tell us something about the concept behind this exhibit?

It is an exploration of the notion of peace from the perspective of artists representing a range of ideologies, nationalities, religious backgrounds and ethnicities. The title is a take on The Art of War by Sun Tzu written in the 6th century B.C.

meres the art of peace graffiti Lady K Fever Curates <em>The Art of Peace</em> at Al Iman Community Center with Rocko, BG183, Meres, Chris Riggs, Scratch, Lexi Bella and more

What inspired it?

It was inspired by Peace December, an organization started five years ago dedicating the month of December to celebrating peace. As Sheikh Musa Drammeh of Peace December contends, trillions of dollars are spent on defense and none are allocated to promoting peace. 

chris riggs graffiti art Lady K Fever Curates <em>The Art of Peace</em> at Al Iman Community Center with Rocko, BG183, Meres, Chris Riggs, Scratch, Lexi Bella and more

As curator, how did you decide which artists to engage in this exhibit? 

When Aldo Perez approached me to curate it, I sought artists from a range of backgrounds and communities. Many, in fact, had already been engaged in community-based projects promoting co-existence.

scratch and lady k fever the art of peace Lady K Fever Curates <em>The Art of Peace</em> at Al Iman Community Center with Rocko, BG183, Meres, Chris Riggs, Scratch, Lexi Bella and more

What were some of the particular challenges you faced in curating this exhibit?

My main concern was that the imagry would not offend the community. I also had to keep the artists’ egos in check, reminding them that The Art of Peace’s principal mission is to promote peace. And I was working with a limited budget.

lexi bella envision peace Lady K Fever Curates <em>The Art of Peace</em> at Al Iman Community Center with Rocko, BG183, Meres, Chris Riggs, Scratch, Lexi Bella and more

The exhibit opens this evening from 6-10pm. How might folks — who can’t make it this evening — see it?

Yes, there will be a reception tonight with DJ Prince Tafari, the artists and special guests — including Assemblyman Jose Rivera. There will also be select artworks for sale. Folks who won’t be able to attend can email artists4peacebx@gmail.com and arrange a time to visit The Art of Peace.

the art of peace Lady K Fever Curates <em>The Art of Peace</em> at Al Iman Community Center with Rocko, BG183, Meres, Chris Riggs, Scratch, Lexi Bella and more

Images:

1.  Rocko 

2. BG183, Tats Cru with Lady K Fever and Aldo Perez posed in front

3. Meres One

4. Chris Riggs

5. Scratch and Lady K Fever

6. Lexi Bella

Interview and photos by Lois Stavsky

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Brooklyn-based Sara Erenthal has shared her distinct drawings, public art, sculptures, and mixed media artworks with us New Yorkers for the past several years in both galleries and on the streets. After viewing her current outdoor installation adjacent to FiveMyles, I had the opportunity speak with her:

sara erenthal fivemyles art installation crown heights nyc Brooklyn Based Sara Erenthal on her Public Artworks, Self Portraits, Ultra Orthodox Jewish Upbringing and more

I love your installation here in Crown Heights adjacent to FiveMyles. When did you first begin to share your talents in public spaces?

About four years ago – soon after I returned to NYC from backpacking in India – I drew 100 small faces with a Sharpie in a range of places from phone booths to subways.  It was quite secretive! And, luckily, I was never arrested. These days I can’t take those risks, and I only paint outside on found objects – like abandoned mattresses, castoff furniture, useless appliances and discarded canvases.

Why the streets?

I’ve always loved street art, and I love sharing with others. When I paint on found objects and leave them on the streets, I give people the chance to pick up a free gift. Art should be accessible to the public, and art galleries can be intimidating.

sara erenthal art on found object Brooklyn Based Sara Erenthal on her Public Artworks, Self Portraits, Ultra Orthodox Jewish Upbringing and more

When did you first begin drawing?

I’ve been drawing all my life, and I’ve always loved art. But growing up in an ultra-Orthodox family, I wasn’t exposed to art outside of a few landscapes and portraits of Hasidic rabbis. I never went to museums or galleries. I do remember, though, seeing art that I loved while I was riding the subways as a child!

When were you first exposed to contemporary art – other than what was “permissible” and what you saw on the subway trains?

I was 17, and I had just broken away from my community. A young Israeli artist at the time introduced me to modern African drawings. That was the beginning!

sara erenthal chassid portrait Brooklyn Based Sara Erenthal on her Public Artworks, Self Portraits, Ultra Orthodox Jewish Upbringing and more

How might your strict religious upbringing have influenced your artwork?

Art was my way of releasing myself from all the constraints that had been imposed upon me.  Through art, I was able to let go of the negativity I’d experienced as a child. Creating art was part of my healing process.

Your artwork has a distinct “outsider” aesthetic. Have you ever studied art in a formal setting?

No.

sara erenthal portrait in room Brooklyn Based Sara Erenthal on her Public Artworks, Self Portraits, Ultra Orthodox Jewish Upbringing and more

You are obviously fond of creating portraits. Who are these people who surface in your drawings?

Many are me – variations of myself at different stages in my life. They’re self-conscious representations of my subconscious. Others are people I encounter in my everyday life or people from my past who remain with me.

Are you generally satisfied with your work?

Yes – but I’m frustrated that I often lack the time, space and materials to do a fraction of what I’d like to do.

sara erenthalself portrait with coffee stains Brooklyn Based Sara Erenthal on her Public Artworks, Self Portraits, Ultra Orthodox Jewish Upbringing and more

Can you elaborate a bit on some of the challenges you face as an artist?

Yes. Working to meet basic expenses consumes far too much energy and time. I would like to be able to create when I’m inspired. Our society needs to do more to support artists. Artists are undervalued. Most people don’t take artists seriously enough. They tend to perceive what we do as frivolous or self-indulgent. Living one’s life as an artist is not a choice; nor is it an indulgence.  And the public needs to understand that.

What do you see as the role of the artist in society?

To share beauty and inspire others, while evoking conversation.

sara erenthal portrait on found art Brooklyn Based Sara Erenthal on her Public Artworks, Self Portraits, Ultra Orthodox Jewish Upbringing and more

What’s ahead?

I would like to continue to create, heal and share. I would also love to exhibit more works in public spaces and in galleries. And I would like to gain more recognition as an artist.

Note: Sara’s installation, Made On a Borrowed iPad – curated by gallery director Hanne Tierney for the Interlude Project – will remain on view through December adjacent to FiveMyles, 558 St Johns Place in Crown Heights.

The interview was conducted and edited by Lois StavskyPhotos: 1  Anthony Disparte; 2 – 4 courtesy of Sara Erenthal; 5 & 6 Lois Stavsky

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Chris daze ellis view to the other side Chris “Daze” Ellis: <em>The City is My Muse</em> through May 1, 2016 at the Museum of the City of New York

The City Is My Muse, featuring new works, along with older paintings and memorabilia, by the legendary Chris “Daze” Ellis, opened this past month at the  Museum of the City of New York.  Curated by Sean Corcoran, the paintings on exhibit — depicting NYC’s streets, subways, landmarks and ordinary folks — exude an expressive, soulful energy. Here are a few more:

Cyclone Drop

chris daze ellis cyclone drop Chris “Daze” Ellis: <em>The City is My Muse</em> through May 1, 2016 at the Museum of the City of New York

The 7 Yard

chris daze ellis the 7 yard Chris “Daze” Ellis: <em>The City is My Muse</em> through May 1, 2016 at the Museum of the City of New York

Queensborough Plaza

Chris Daze Ellis Queens plaza Chris “Daze” Ellis: <em>The City is My Muse</em> through May 1, 2016 at the Museum of the City of New York

Daze with his painting Whitlock Avenue

Chris Ellis Daze with painting Chris “Daze” Ellis: <em>The City is My Muse</em> through May 1, 2016 at the Museum of the City of New York

Tomorrow evening — December 8 — at 6:30 pm, Daze will be joined by Jane Dickson and Lee Quinones in a discussion about how New York City’s environment, culture and daily life have inspired their work. Curator Sean Corcoran will moderate the panel. Use Code ART1 for discount tickets here.

the city is my muse daze mcny Chris “Daze” Ellis: <em>The City is My Muse</em> through May 1, 2016 at the Museum of the City of New York

The Museum of the City of New York is located at 1220 5th Avenue.

Photo credits: 1-3 Lois Stavsky; 4 & 5 Tara Murray

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stikman maybe he always looks the same The Ever Evolving stikman at Woodward Gallery on the Lower East Side

Featured in Woodward Gallery’s current exhibit Potentia Triumalong with works by Thomas Buildmore and Terence Netter, are over two dozen variations of our beloved stikman.  Representing an extraordinary range of imaginative styles and genres fashioned from sundry materials — many recycled — the artworks remain on display through December 22.

 One of many on paper, Mixed media 

stikman on paper woodward gallery The Ever Evolving stikman at Woodward Gallery on the Lower East Side

Collage on paper series, with Terence Netter on left and Thomas Buildmore on right rear

stikman buildmore and Terence Netter The Ever Evolving stikman at Woodward Gallery on the Lower East Side

Small Concrete Painting, Mixed media

stikman on found surface on floor The Ever Evolving stikman at Woodward Gallery on the Lower East Side

Bird Garden Shelter, Mixed media

stikman encaged The Ever Evolving stikman at Woodward Gallery on the Lower East Side

Stiks, Stone, Metal, Mixed media

stikman on stone The Ever Evolving stikman at Woodward Gallery on the Lower East Side

A larger segment of the huge installation in the rear room

stikman woodward gallery jw The Ever Evolving stikman at Woodward Gallery on the Lower East Side

Woodward Gallery is located at 133 Eldridge Street between Broome and Delancey Streets. Hours are Tuesday-Saturday: 11:00 am – 6:00 pm; Sunday: 12:00 pm – 5:00 pm and by appointment.

First image: Maybe He Always Looks the Same. but It’s Us that See Him Differently, Close-up, Mixed media

Photo credits: 1-6 Dani Reyes Mozeson; 7 John Woodward

Note: Check here for more of stikman now on view at Woodward Gallery – as captured by Kendall Whitehouse.

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Nina Pandolfo Rivington Wall Nina Pandolfo Brings Her Whimsical World to the Rivington Wall and to Coburn Projects Lower East Side Gallery Space

Noted Brazilian artist Nina Pandolfo recently made her way back to NYC. And we are thrilled that she did! Her delightfully dreamlike paintings will remain on exhibit through November 29th at Coburn Projects‘ Lower East Side gallery space at 2 Rivington Street, and her whimsical outdoor mural will continue to grace the huge wall on Rivington Street off the Bowery until the end of the year.

The complete mural, as seen this week 

nina pandolfo street art mural nyc Nina Pandolfo Brings Her Whimsical World to the Rivington Wall and to Coburn Projects Lower East Side Gallery Space

Nina at work on Rivington Street earlier this month

nina pandolfo paints street art mural nyc Nina Pandolfo Brings Her Whimsical World to the Rivington Wall and to Coburn Projects Lower East Side Gallery Space

And here are three of Nina’s new paintings in Little Things for Life, her first NYC solo exhibit, presented by Coburn Projects:

Breathe Slowly

nina pandolfo art Breathe Slowly gallery  Nina Pandolfo Brings Her Whimsical World to the Rivington Wall and to Coburn Projects Lower East Side Gallery Space

Follow Your Instincts

nina pandolfo follow your instincts art gallery Nina Pandolfo Brings Her Whimsical World to the Rivington Wall and to Coburn Projects Lower East Side Gallery Space

One Way to…

Nina Pandolfo Other Way To art gallery Nina Pandolfo Brings Her Whimsical World to the Rivington Wall and to Coburn Projects Lower East Side Gallery Space

Located at 2 Rivington Street off the Bowery, the gallery is open Wed – Sun 10-6pm.

Photos: 1, 2, 4-6 Dani Reyes Mozeson; 3 courtesy of Coburn Projects

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brian lacey  1xRUN Production Manager Brian Lacey in Detroit on 1xRUN, Graffiti, Limited Prints and <em>Tag the Jewels </em>

Based in Detroi’s Eastern Market district, 1xRUN is the world’s leading publisher of fine art editions for original art.  Also host to Detroit’s Inner State Gallery, a world-renowned exhibition space, it works with established and emerging artists throughout the globe. When I stopped by on my recent visit to Detroit, I had the opportunity to speak to 1xRUN Production Manager Brian Lacey.

Can you tell us something about your role as 1xRUN production manager? Just what does your job entail?

I am involved with every step of the printing process. I communicate with the artists, set up files for printing, retouch images, trim prints, create certificates of authenticity and I place orders with vendors.

You are an artist. Is that what attracted you to this particular space? 

Yes, as an artist I was drawn to this space. I have a background in graffiti and a degree from the College for Creative Studies, where I studied illustration and fine arts.

run the jewels detroit  1xRUN Production Manager Brian Lacey in Detroit on 1xRUN, Graffiti, Limited Prints and <em>Tag the Jewels </em>

Has your experience as a graffiti writer impacted you?

Definitely! Graffiti is a great teacher. I learned a lot from it — on so many levels.

1xRUN collaborates with so many extraordinary artists. How do you select them? Is it a team effort?

Yes! It’s definitely a team effort. We have weekly sessions where a group of us meet to make curatorial decisions. Selections are made by the consensus of us all.

see one print 1XRun  1xRUN Production Manager Brian Lacey in Detroit on 1xRUN, Graffiti, Limited Prints and <em>Tag the Jewels </em>

Has your position at 1xRUN presented any personal challenges?

As someone who loves working hands-on, I had to adjust to spending a lot of time in front of a computer. But it’s awesome to be able to look at art all day!

1xRUN is best-known for the first-rate prints it produces. Does it offer anything in addition to prints?

It does offer a number of original works, books and sketches.

binho print 1xrun  1xRUN Production Manager Brian Lacey in Detroit on 1xRUN, Graffiti, Limited Prints and <em>Tag the Jewels </em>

What about the name 1xRUN?

It’s about offering limited editions of outstanding works that run for one time (1X) only.  Too many print releases can devalue an artist’s work.

I can see that. I love these images on exhibit in Tag the Jewels. Can you tell us something about this project?

It is a partnership among Run The Jewels, 1xRUN and Mass Appeal. Graffiti artists from around the world created murals celebrating the one year anniversary of Run The Jewels 2 (RTJ2). On exhibit are 20 photos of these murals spanning six continents.

frop muso print run the jewels 1xrun  1xRUN Production Manager Brian Lacey in Detroit on 1xRUN, Graffiti, Limited Prints and <em>Tag the Jewels </em>

 What a great concept! And what an amazing range of art on display throughout this space! 

Images:

1. Brian Lacey to the right of his artwork, T002

2. Jesse Kassel and Elmer for Tag the Jewels

3. See One for Tag the Jewels

4. Binho for Tag the Jewels

5. Frop and Muso for Tag the Jewels

Interview and photos by Lois Stavsky

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