Exhibits

Deborah Fisher Paul Ramirez Jones <em>No Longer Empty</em> Transforms Former Bronx Borough Courthouse: Deborah Fisher & Paul Ramirez Jonas, Teresa Diehl, Shellyne Rodriguez, David Scanavino, Ellen Harvey, Lady K Fever and more

Almost 40 years ago the historic Old Bronx Courthouse building closed its doors. This past Thursday evening, the landmark structure reopened to host When You Cut Into the Present the Future Leaks Out, a thoroughly engaging multi-media exhibit, curated by Regine Basha for No Longer Empty Featuring over two dozen artists on three levels, its title references the remix suggested by William S. Boroughs. Here are a few more images captured on Thursday:

Teresa DiehlL-Alber-Into, Video and sound installation

Teresa Diehl <em>No Longer Empty</em> Transforms Former Bronx Borough Courthouse: Deborah Fisher & Paul Ramirez Jonas, Teresa Diehl, Shellyne Rodriguez, David Scanavino, Ellen Harvey, Lady K Fever and more

 Another view of  Teresa Diehl‘s ever-transforming hallucinatory musical installation

Diehl <em>No Longer Empty</em> Transforms Former Bronx Borough Courthouse: Deborah Fisher & Paul Ramirez Jonas, Teresa Diehl, Shellyne Rodriguez, David Scanavino, Ellen Harvey, Lady K Fever and more

Shellyne RodriguezPrototype For Belphegor’s Eye, 168 flesh-tint dyed mousetraps, rhinestones, gold chains, copper wire, plywood

Shellyne <em>No Longer Empty</em> Transforms Former Bronx Borough Courthouse: Deborah Fisher & Paul Ramirez Jonas, Teresa Diehl, Shellyne Rodriguez, David Scanavino, Ellen Harvey, Lady K Fever and more

Shellyne RodriguezGeperudeta, Ceramic

Shellyne Rodriguez Geperudeta <em>No Longer Empty</em> Transforms Former Bronx Borough Courthouse: Deborah Fisher & Paul Ramirez Jonas, Teresa Diehl, Shellyne Rodriguez, David Scanavino, Ellen Harvey, Lady K Fever and more

David Scanavino, Untitled, Linoleum tile

David scanvino tile installation <em>No Longer Empty</em> Transforms Former Bronx Borough Courthouse: Deborah Fisher & Paul Ramirez Jonas, Teresa Diehl, Shellyne Rodriguez, David Scanavino, Ellen Harvey, Lady K Fever and more

Ellen HarveyAlien Souvenir Stand (close-up), Oil on aluminum, watercolor on gesso board, propane tanks, plywood, aluminum siding and poles, aluminum diamond plate, magnets

ellen harvey alien souveneir stand <em>No Longer Empty</em> Transforms Former Bronx Borough Courthouse: Deborah Fisher & Paul Ramirez Jonas, Teresa Diehl, Shellyne Rodriguez, David Scanavino, Ellen Harvey, Lady K Fever and more

Lady K FeverAll Rise (close-up), Mylar on façade of  building

Lady K Fever Old Court House <em>No Longer Empty</em> Transforms Former Bronx Borough Courthouse: Deborah Fisher & Paul Ramirez Jonas, Teresa Diehl, Shellyne Rodriguez, David Scanavino, Ellen Harvey, Lady K Fever and more

The exhibit continues through July 19, along with a variety of programs ranging from fashion shows to presentations by such Bronx-based artists as Eric Orr, Per One and Joe Conzo. The old Bronx Courthouse is located at 878 Brook Avenue at East 161 Street and Third Avenue in the South Bronx. 

Note: First photo features Deborah Fisher and Paul Ramirez Jonas, Something for Nothing, Mixed media, Custom designed neon sign

Research for this post by City-As-School student Diana Davidova; photos 1, 5, and 7 Diana Davidova; 2-4, 6 and 8 Lois Stavsky

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roa mural Belgian Artist Roa in Jersey City and at the Jonathan LeVine Gallery

The extraordinarily gifted Belgian artist Roa has recently shared his talents and passion for the animal kingdom with us outdoors in Jersey City and indoors at the Jonathan LeVine Gallery. The following images were captured this past Saturday near the entrance to the Holland Tunnel, not far from Mana Contemporary where Roa created his works for Metazoa, currently on exhibit at Jonathan LeVine:

Close-up

Roa street art Belgian Artist Roa in Jersey City and at the Jonathan LeVine Gallery

Close-up with Roa at work

Roa paints Belgian Artist Roa in Jersey City and at the Jonathan LeVine Gallery

The mural, full view

Roa street art Jersey City mural Belgian Artist Roa in Jersey City and at the Jonathan LeVine Gallery

And here is a sampling of ROA‘s interactive works at Jonathan LeVine, largely created on found, salvaged materials:

Sturnus Vulgaris, mixed-media

Roa Composition ll Jonathan Levine Gallery Belgian Artist Roa in Jersey City and at the Jonathan LeVine GalleryRoa Sturnus Vulgaris Jonathan Levine Belgian Artist Roa in Jersey City and at the Jonathan LeVine Gallery

Composition II: Lutrinate, Salmonidae, Anguilliformes, mixed media

Sturnus Vulgaris, mixed media

Roa Sylvilagus Audubonii Jonathan Levine Belgian Artist Roa in Jersey City and at the Jonathan LeVine Gallery

NY Canidae, mixed media, rear

Roa Metazoa Belgian Artist Roa in Jersey City and at the Jonathan LeVine Gallery

Metazoa continues through May 2 at Jonathan LeVine at the gallery’s 529 West 20th Street space.

Note: For a wonderfully interactive view of several pieces check out this post on Colosaal

Photos of Roa in Jersey City by bytegirl; of Roa’s works at Jonathan LeVine, Dani Reyes Mozeson

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Jamie Martinez Mountain Cat  Jamie Martinezs Triangulism Art in <em>Hunt for Inspiration</em> Continues until April 23 at Chelseas Galerie Protégé

Until April 23 it is still possible to see Jamie Martinez’s distinctly wonderful art at Gallerie Protégé.  Fashioned meticulously and inventively from triangles, Jamie’s works on display range from exquisite oil paintings to tantalizing abstract designs. Here is a sampling of the works from the exhibit, Hunt for Inspiration, curated by Oscar A. Laluyan:

Leopardo, 552 individual oil paintings on wood

Jamie Martinez art Leopardo oil on wood  Jamie Martinezs Triangulism Art in <em>Hunt for Inspiration</em> Continues until April 23 at Chelseas Galerie Protégé

El Lobo, oil on canvas

Jamie Martinez El Lobo oil on canvas  Jamie Martinezs Triangulism Art in <em>Hunt for Inspiration</em> Continues until April 23 at Chelseas Galerie Protégé

Abstract 15, digital c-print

Jamie Martinez abstract  Jamie Martinezs Triangulism Art in <em>Hunt for Inspiration</em> Continues until April 23 at Chelseas Galerie Protégé

Particularly exciting news for us street art aficionados is that several of Jamie Martinez‘s abstract works will be blown up between 6-9 feet for an upcoming public art project, Off the Grid: Innovations in Contemporary Abstraction.  The works will remain on exhibit for a minimum of six months at the site of the West Village Triangle Park at 7th Avenue and 12th Street.

Note:  Gallerie Protégé is located on the lower level of Chelsea Frames at 197 9th Avenue

galerie protege  Jamie Martinezs Triangulism Art in <em>Hunt for Inspiration</em> Continues until April 23 at Chelseas Galerie Protégé

Photo credits: 1, 2, and 5 Dani Reyes Mozeson; 3 Lois Stavsky; 4 courtesy of the artist; the first image pictured is Mountain Cat, oil on canvas; the final image is Medusa, 414 individual oil paintings on wood.

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LMNOPI art Brooklyn Is the Future <em>Brooklyn Is the Future</em> to Open This Evening at the Vazquez in Bushwick: N Carlos J, Chris Soria, Eelco, Marc Evan, Savior Elmundo, Ben Angotti, Rob Plater, LMNOPI and many more

Featuring an awesome array of outdoor and indoor murals, along with a range of smaller works in different media, Brooklyn is the Future opens this evening at the Vazquez at 93 Forrest Street in Bushwick. Here is a small sampling of what I saw when I stopped by yesterday.

Brooklyn is the Future curator, N Carlos J at work.

N Carlos J street art NYC1 <em>Brooklyn Is the Future</em> to Open This Evening at the Vazquez in Bushwick: N Carlos J, Chris Soria, Eelco, Marc Evan, Savior Elmundo, Ben Angotti, Rob Plater, LMNOPI and many more

Chris Soria at work 

Chris Soria paints street art nyc <em>Brooklyn Is the Future</em> to Open This Evening at the Vazquez in Bushwick: N Carlos J, Chris Soria, Eelco, Marc Evan, Savior Elmundo, Ben Angotti, Rob Plater, LMNOPI and many more

 Eelco at work

eelco paints <em>Brooklyn Is the Future</em> to Open This Evening at the Vazquez in Bushwick: N Carlos J, Chris Soria, Eelco, Marc Evan, Savior Elmundo, Ben Angotti, Rob Plater, LMNOPI and many more

Marc Evan at work

Marc Evan paints <em>Brooklyn Is the Future</em> to Open This Evening at the Vazquez in Bushwick: N Carlos J, Chris Soria, Eelco, Marc Evan, Savior Elmundo, Ben Angotti, Rob Plater, LMNOPI and many more

Savior Elmundo, close-up

savior el munco art close up <em>Brooklyn Is the Future</em> to Open This Evening at the Vazquez in Bushwick: N Carlos J, Chris Soria, Eelco, Marc Evan, Savior Elmundo, Ben Angotti, Rob Plater, LMNOPI and many more

Ben Angotti, close-up

Ben Angotti painting <em>Brooklyn Is the Future</em> to Open This Evening at the Vazquez in Bushwick: N Carlos J, Chris Soria, Eelco, Marc Evan, Savior Elmundo, Ben Angotti, Rob Plater, LMNOPI and many more

Rob Plater

Plater art <em>Brooklyn Is the Future</em> to Open This Evening at the Vazquez in Bushwick: N Carlos J, Chris Soria, Eelco, Marc Evan, Savior Elmundo, Ben Angotti, Rob Plater, LMNOPI and many more

The two-weekend long exhibit and charity event opens this evening at 6pm.

Brooklyn <em>Brooklyn Is the Future</em> to Open This Evening at the Vazquez in Bushwick: N Carlos J, Chris Soria, Eelco, Marc Evan, Savior Elmundo, Ben Angotti, Rob Plater, LMNOPI and many more

Photos by Lois Stavsky; the first photo features LMNOPI

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keith haring close up untitled 1984 <em>Keith Haring: Heaven and Hell</em> at Skarstedt in Chelsea through April 18

Unlike so many of Keith Haring‘s playfully iconic works that exude a child-like innocence, the huge works on exhibit in Heaven and Hell largely suggest an eerie darkness and unfettered eroticism. Here’s a sampling:

Wide view of two untitled works, 1984

keith haring <em>Keith Haring: Heaven and Hell</em> at Skarstedt in Chelsea through April 18

Untitled, 1985

Keith haring Untitled 1985 <em>Keith Haring: Heaven and Hell</em> at Skarstedt in Chelsea through April 18

Untitled, 1984

keith haring untitled artwork 1984 <em>Keith Haring: Heaven and Hell</em> at Skarstedt in Chelsea through April 18

Untitled, 1984

Keith Haring art <em>Keith Haring: Heaven and Hell</em> at Skarstedt in Chelsea through April 18

Heaven and Hell remains on exhibit at Skarstedt at 550 West 21 Street through next Saturday.

Photos of images: 1, 4 and 5 City-as-School intern Zachariah Messaoud; 2 and 3 Dani Reyes Mozeson. Note: First photo is a close-up from the huge mural below it (R).

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RAE This May Come as a Shock RAE on the Loss and Retrieval of his Trunk in <em>Trunk Work</em>

On exhibit through April 19 at 34 1/2 Bayard Street in Manhattan’s Chinatown, RAE’s brilliantly idiocyncratic Trunk Work celebrates the retrieval and contents of RAE‘s trunk from his former Brooklyn studio, while chronicling the events related to its loss and rescue. Graphically and conceptually engaging, Trunk Work wittily defines the mood and culture of the Brooklyn environs that housed RAE‘s trunk, as it showcases a range of RAE’s rescued and new works.

For four years, you couldn’t gain access to your trunk. What exactly was inside it?

Various artworks, notebooks, sketches, implements and a range of personal items.

rae close up RAE on the Loss and Retrieval of his Trunk in <em>Trunk Work</em>

How did you lose access to it?

I had been maintaining a studio in a Flatlands, Brooklyn apartment building. But as a result of tenant complaints, I was forcibly removed. Barred from entering the building, I had no way to retrieve my trunk.

rae neighbor note RAE on the Loss and Retrieval of his Trunk in <em>Trunk Work</em>

rae audio system RAE on the Loss and Retrieval of his Trunk in <em>Trunk Work</em>

What kinds of complaints might these tenants have had?

They didn’t like my taste in music; they complained that it was too loud. And the noise from my art practice bothered some. Finally, when a microwave I was using to melt some materials exploded, the landlord decided that he’d had enough of me.

RAE found objects RAE on the Loss and Retrieval of his Trunk in <em>Trunk Work</em>

How did you finally retrieve your trunk?

This past August, cracks were discovered in the building’s facade and the entire building was evacuated. Amidst the chaos of it all, I was able to retrieve my trunk from what was once my studio.

We’re so glad you did! What a story! And what an amazing recreation of it all!

In true RAE fashion, Trunk Work is far more than an art exhibit; it is a totally immersive experience. Set in a Chinatown basement at 94 1/2 Bayard Street, right off Mulberry, it continues through April 19, Thursday-Sunday (except for Easter) from 1-6pm.

Photos 1-3 and 5 by Lois Stavsky; 4 by Dani Reyes Mozeson

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frank lexi Bella Kosbe the best of the worst Street Art Prankster Hanksy Brings <em>The Best of the Worst</em> to NYC: Frank Ape, Lexi Bella, Cosbe, Miss Zukie, CB23, Magda Love, Meres, Russell King, Col, UR New York, Mr. Toll, El Sol 25 and much more

The following guest post is by Houda Lazrak, a graduate student in Museum Studies at New York University.  

This past weekend, Hanksy’s much-anticipated show, The Best of the Worst, drew hundreds of street art fans to the former Chase Bank at 104 Delancey Street on Manhattan’s Lower East Side. Along with some of NYC’s most notable graffiti writers and street artists, Hanksy transformed the space into a NYC playground-like arena — with a skate ramp, a Chinese massage parlor and more wonderfully-engaging site-specific installations. Dozens of intriguing, overlapping pieces, paste-ups and stickers paid homage to street art, while, also, poking fun at the scene.

Miss Zukie

Miss Zukie  Street Art Prankster Hanksy Brings <em>The Best of the Worst</em> to NYC: Frank Ape, Lexi Bella, Cosbe, Miss Zukie, CB23, Magda Love, Meres, Russell King, Col, UR New York, Mr. Toll, El Sol 25 and much more

CB23 

CB23 Street Art Prankster Hanksy Brings <em>The Best of the Worst</em> to NYC: Frank Ape, Lexi Bella, Cosbe, Miss Zukie, CB23, Magda Love, Meres, Russell King, Col, UR New York, Mr. Toll, El Sol 25 and much more

Magda Love and Hanksy and more

Magda Love Street Art Prankster Hanksy Brings <em>The Best of the Worst</em> to NYC: Frank Ape, Lexi Bella, Cosbe, Miss Zukie, CB23, Magda Love, Meres, Russell King, Col, UR New York, Mr. Toll, El Sol 25 and much more

Meres and more

Meres the best of the worst Street Art Prankster Hanksy Brings <em>The Best of the Worst</em> to NYC: Frank Ape, Lexi Bella, Cosbe, Miss Zukie, CB23, Magda Love, Meres, Russell King, Col, UR New York, Mr. Toll, El Sol 25 and much more

Russell King, Col and UR New York

Russell King more Street Art Prankster Hanksy Brings <em>The Best of the Worst</em> to NYC: Frank Ape, Lexi Bella, Cosbe, Miss Zukie, CB23, Magda Love, Meres, Russell King, Col, UR New York, Mr. Toll, El Sol 25 and much more

Hanksy

Hanksy the best of the worst Street Art Prankster Hanksy Brings <em>The Best of the Worst</em> to NYC: Frank Ape, Lexi Bella, Cosbe, Miss Zukie, CB23, Magda Love, Meres, Russell King, Col, UR New York, Mr. Toll, El Sol 25 and much more

Included, too, was a rather formally installed art exhibit in the wittily-titled Gag-Osian Gallery featuring some of NYC’s most popular street artists.

Mr. Toll at the Gag-Osian

Mr toll Street Art Prankster Hanksy Brings <em>The Best of the Worst</em> to NYC: Frank Ape, Lexi Bella, Cosbe, Miss Zukie, CB23, Magda Love, Meres, Russell King, Col, UR New York, Mr. Toll, El Sol 25 and much more

El Sol 25 at the Gag-Osian

El Sol25 Street Art Prankster Hanksy Brings <em>The Best of the Worst</em> to NYC: Frank Ape, Lexi Bella, Cosbe, Miss Zukie, CB23, Magda Love, Meres, Russell King, Col, UR New York, Mr. Toll, El Sol 25 and much more

All photos by Houda Lazrak; pictured in the first photo are Frank Ape, Lexi Bella and Cosbe

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Speaking with Mor

March 26, 2015

For the past several years, Mor‘s exquisitely-fashioned stencils have been surfacing on the streets of NYC and beyond. I had the opportunity to speak to Mor earlier this week at Con Artist, where she was preparing for tomorrow’s opening at City Bird Gallery.

Mor with stencil con artist Speaking with Mor

When did you first get up on the streets? What was your medium at the time?

I started almost five years ago with hand-made stickers. And the following year, I pasted up my first one-layer stencil – a face looking upward — in Williamsburg.

What inspired you to work with stencils?

When I was in middle school, I was living in Bushwick — in its early stages of gentrification. I remember passing Swoon’s work on my way to school. Its beauty astounded me. She is my greatest inspiration. And C215’s amazing work – that surfaced in Brooklyn back then — also moved me to experiment with stencils.

What about the streets? What was the appeal of the streets to you?

I love the notion of creating something beautiful and just giving it to others.

mor stencil art Lower East Side NYC Speaking with Mor

Were you ever arrested back then?

I was once caught tagging with a black marker, and I ended up spending the night in jail. It is a risk that all street artists take.

How did your family feel about what you were doing?

They were positive, encouraging me to do what makes me happy

Do you have a formal arts education?

I am, for the most part, self-taught.  But my art teachers always encouraged me.

Mor street art nyc Speaking with Mor

Any thoughts on the graffiti street art divide?

There definitely is a divide, and there will always be some kind of beef between graffiti writers and street artists. It’s not cool when a street artist goes over graffiti. Nor is it cool when a writer tags over street art.  But I think the media – particularly the Internet – is partly responsible for the beef.

How do you feel about the role of the Internet in this scene?

It has definitely changed the playing field!  It’s great that it gives permanence to a transient art form. But — on the negative side — it boosts a type of showmanship, while giving exposure to mediocre artwork.

What inspires you these days?

Much of my inspiration comes from my dreams. I’m also into mysticism.

Mor stencil street art in Bushwick NYC Speaking with Mor

Are there any particular cultures that have influenced your aesthetic?

Tribal ones have the most influence.

Have you collaborated with other artists? 

I haven’t in the past, but I will be painting with Ian Bertram at City Bird in preparation for our joint exhibit.

How do you feel about the movement of street art and graffiti into galleries? 

As my father is an artist, I grew up around galleries. I do think, though, that there is something sterile about galleries as compared to public spaces.  Showing in a gallery is very different from getting up on the streets.  And I don’t feel that the art world understands art — not just street art, any art!

Mor stencil art Centre fuge East Village NYC Speaking with Mor

How has your work evolved in the past few years? 

The streets have energized me to keep pushing myself. I feel that I’ve grown so much in just finding my process.

Have you any preferred surfaces when you are out on the streets?

I love brick walls — the way art ages on brick walls. And I like smooth doors because they’re easy to use.

How would you describe your ideal working space?

At the moment I have my ideal working space — here at Con Artist.  I love my Con Artist family. But I can imagine some day sharing a huge space with the extraordinarily talented Ian Bertram, a constant source of inspiration!

Ian Bertram art Speaking with Mor

What percentage of your time is devoted to art?

As much time as I possibly can — when I’m not dealing with family responsibilities or bartending, my main source of income.

Any thoughts about the marketing of graffiti by the corporate world?

We all know that the corporate world is filled with scoundrels and pirates, but we also know that as artists, we need its financial support.

What do you see as the role of the artist in society?

It is the artist’s role to channel deeply seated emotions and creativity in a positive way. It is an essential role.

Mor stencil art skate boards Speaking with Mor

What do you see as the future of street art?

I have no idea where it’s going. There’s been too much hype around street art.  But graffiti will always sustain. Someone will always be writing his or her name on a wall.

What’s ahead for you?

I just want to continue to channel my creativity into living a productive life as an artist, while engaging and, hopefully, enriching others.  Tomorrow night I will be showing my newest pieces, alongside Ian Bertram, at City Bird Gallery.

Ian Bertram and Mor City Bird Gallery Speaking with Mor

 Congratulations! That sounds great!

Photos: 1 and 7 City-as-School intern Zachariah Messaoud; 2, 4 and 5 Lois Stavsky; 3  Sara C. Mozeson & 6 Ian Bertram

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Royce Bannon Kerren Hasson Fishing Buddies art Royce Bannon on Living the After Life at 17 Frost

On exhibit through tomorrow — Saturday — evening at 17 Frost is Royce Bannon‘s Living the After Life.  Fashioned on a range of found surfaces — some collaboratively — all of the images intrigue. Curious as to what is going on, I posed some questions to Royce.

What does this all mean? What is going on here?

These works represent my ideal vision of the afterlife — doing the things that I enjoy doing — when I am living as a ghost. It is a celebration of life after death.

Royce Bannon KA art 17 Frost Royce Bannon on Living the After Life at 17 Frost

Royce Bannon Afterlife Royce Bannon on Living the After Life at 17 Frost

 What, do you suppose, was the impetus behind this theme? Why the focus on life after death?

My mother recently died. For quite awhile I’d been preparing myself for her death and thinking about the afterlife. Death is not the end.

Royce Bannon Only Positive Thoughts Royce Bannon on Living the After Life at 17 Frost

How have folks responded to this body of work? 

The response has been positive. There’s been considerable interest in the works.

Royce Bannon Observer Obscuraart Frost Royce Bannon on Living the After Life at 17 Frost

How can folks to be sure see the exhibit before it closes?

Everyone is invited to the closing party to be held tomorrow evening — Saturday, March 21 — at 17 Frost Street from 7-11pm.

living the after life party invite Royce Bannon on Living the After Life at 17 Frost

Note: Tomorrow evening’s closing party will feature a new collabo with EKG and a live drum machine performance by Jefferson Wells.

Images

1. Fishing buddies, Collab with Keren Hasson, Acrylic on wood

2. The swing is always broken in limbo, Collab with KA, Acrylic and spray paint on metal.

3. Remember that day, pt 2, Acrylic on wood

4. Only positive thoughts, Acrylic on metal

5. So far, Collab with Observer Obscura, Mixed media on wood

Photos of artworks by Lois Stavsky

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Home to three distinct galleries – Artemisia GalleryAzart Gallery and MZ Urban Art – Chelsea 27 is currently presenting Spring Group Show featuring works by an eclectic range of emerging and established international artists. While visiting the gallery yesterday, we had the opportunity to speak to Marina Hadley, owner of MZ Urban Art.

pez azart <em>Spring Group Show</em> at Chelsea 27: El Pez, Kokian, Sliks, Sen2, Esther Barend, Kurar, Joyce DiBona and more

Can you tell us something about Chelsea 27?  This current exhibit features artworks presented by three distinct galleries, yet the pieces seem to seamlessly work together. 

We are three friends. I had previously worked with Latifa Metheny, the owner of Azart Gallery, at 547 West 27th Street, and I met Christine Jeanquier, who runs Artemisia Gallery, through a mutual friend.  We respect each other’s visions and choices.

kokian artwork artemisia <em>Spring Group Show</em> at Chelsea 27: El Pez, Kokian, Sliks, Sen2, Esther Barend, Kurar, Joyce DiBona and more

You seem to all share a somewhat similar vision. 

Yes, we are interested in showcasing emerging and contemporary artists — who are working in a range of media and styles – from across the globe. We are interested, too, in discovering new talents. Latifa Metheny particularly focuses on the culture of street art and Christine Jeanquier on French artists.

sliks abstract art chelsea27 <em>Spring Group Show</em> at Chelsea 27: El Pez, Kokian, Sliks, Sen2, Esther Barend, Kurar, Joyce DiBona and more

 Why did you choose this particular location?

It is on the ground level of an ideal space in the heart of the Chelsea art district. It was a step I was ready to take, as it is the perfect location for attracting serious collectors.

sen2 azart galllery <em>Spring Group Show</em> at Chelsea 27: El Pez, Kokian, Sliks, Sen2, Esther Barend, Kurar, Joyce DiBona and more

Yes, it does seem perfect! What advice would you offer an emerging artist who would like to see his work featured in a Chelsea gallery?

Before approaching a gallery, get to know its owner and the work that it features. That is how you will know if the gallery is likely to be receptive to your work. Be sure to have a professional-looking website with each image labeled with its size and medium. When visiting a gallery, bring business cards and a cover letter that look professional. Check out — as often as possible — what other artists are doing. Work hard and be persistent! And be sure to have a body of work and a recognizable style before approaching a gallery owner.

Esther Barand <em>Spring Group Show</em> at Chelsea 27: El Pez, Kokian, Sliks, Sen2, Esther Barend, Kurar, Joyce DiBona and more

That certainly sounds like great advice! Is there anything in particular that you, yourself, look for in an artist?

Yes, I look for someone who has a statement to make and is willing to take risks to make it. I develop a personal relationship with each artist whose works I exhibit.

kurar stencil artist artemisa <em>Spring Group Show</em> at Chelsea 27: El Pez, Kokian, Sliks, Sen2, Esther Barend, Kurar, Joyce DiBona and more

So much is happening in the contemporary art scene. How do you keep up with it all?

I follow social media sites like Facebook and Twitter. I regularly read the New York Times, the London Times and the LA Times. I read essential blogs and I talk to people.

Joyce DiBona MZ Urban Art <em>Spring Group Show</em> at Chelsea 27: El Pez, Kokian, Sliks, Sen2, Esther Barend, Kurar, Joyce DiBona and more

We’re looking forward to upcoming exhibits and events, and we are delighted that Chelsea 27 is showcasing so many artists who are active on our streets.

Note:  The exhibit continues through Saturday, March 21.

 Artworks

1. El Pez 

2. Kokian

3. Sliks

4. Sen2

5. Esther Barend, close-up

6. Kurar

7. Joyce DiBona

Interview by Lois Stavsky with City-as-School intern Zachariah Messaoud

Photo credits: 1, 2, 5 & 6 City-as-School intern Zachariah Messaoud; 3 & 7 Lois Stavsky and 4 Dani Reyes Mozeson

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